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Given a date, what is the most efficient way to query the last record before that date, any record that equals that date, and the next one after that date.

It should be functionally equivalent to a query like this:

from asset in Assets
where asset.Id == assetId
select new {
    Previous = (from a in a.Orders where a.Date < myDate orderby a.Date descending select a).FirstOrDefault(),
    Current = (from a in a.Orders where a.Date == myDate select a).SingleOrDefault(),
    Next = (from a in a.Orders where a.Date > myDate orderby a.Date select a).FirstOrDefault()
}

As is, this query runs three queries, and presumably has to sort the dataset by myDate three times to do it.

Some similar questions:

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To provide the "most efficient" query depends on what you mean by efficient.

If you want a single query to the database, a single sort of orders by date and finally fast look-ups by date then I suggest the following might be the most efficient. :-)

var orders =
    (from a in Assets
     where a.Id == assetId
     from o in a.Orders
     orderby o.Date
     select o).ToArray();

var previous = orders.LastOrDefault(o => o.Date < myDate);
var current = orders.SingleOrDefault(o => o.Date == myDate);
var next = orders.FirstOrDefault(o => o.Date > myDate);

This should query the database once for the orders associated with the required asset Id, sort them by date, and return them as an array in memory. Since this is in memory it is now blindingly fast to look for the current, previous & next records for the specified date.

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A useful answer, depending on the size of the return. However, I think it could be improved with a container that knows it's sorted, so the lookups are O(log n) instead of O(n) as they are in your example. –  Scott Stafford Jan 25 '11 at 15:03
1  
@Scott - Yes, it can be improved. I did a test with 100,000 order records - one record for each day from today going back April 1737 - not a likely real-world example. It took around 7.2 milliseconds to run using the method given in my answer. I also created a bisecting index method and this took about 0.7 milliseconds. Using Array.FindIndex it took 0.83 milliseconds. Both of these last two approaches the code was less readable. In practical terms, would this performance difference matter to you? –  Enigmativity Jan 26 '11 at 23:30
    
Probably not. ;) Thanks for the benchmarking work! –  Scott Stafford Jan 27 '11 at 16:38

Does your Orders table have a sequential ID field? If so, you might be able to do it with:

from asset in Assets
where asset.Id == assetID
let current = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date == myDate).FirstOrDefault()
where current != null
let previous = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.id == current.id - 1).FirstOrDefault()
let next = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.id == current.id + 1).FirstOrDefault()
select new {
    Previous = previous,
    Current = current,
    Next = next
};

If it doesn't, then it'd be a bit more code:

from asset in Assets
where asset.Id == assetID
let current = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date == myDate).FirstOrDefault()
where current != null
let previous = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date < current.Date).OrderByDescending(x => x.Date).FirstOrDefault()
let next = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date > current.Date).OrderBy(x => x.Date).FirstOrDefault()
select new {
    Previous = previous,
    Current = current,
    Next = next
};

That should get compiled into a single SQL query that utilizes sub-queries. IE: the database server will execute multiple queries, but your client program is only submitting one.

Edit One other idea that would work if your Order table had sequential IDs:

var sample = (from asset in Assets
              where asset.Id == assetID
              let current = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date == myDate).FirstOrDefault()
              where current != null
              from order in asset.Orders
              where order.Id == current.id - 1
              select order)
             .Take(3)
             .ToArray();

var Previous = sample[0];
var Current = sample[1];
var Next = sample[2];
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I do not have a sequential identifier, unfortunately. Doesn't your example (#2) generate the same thing as the one I suggested? –  Scott Stafford Jan 24 '11 at 19:48
    
I don't know without setting up a mock environment, but I believe that it should be compiled to one SQL query from your client which just uses subqueries. Unfortunately, if you have no sequential ID, then I think this is the best you can do--you've deprived yourself of the means to accomplish the goal more efficiently. –  C. Lawrence Wenham Jan 24 '11 at 19:55
    
Probably so -- the sequential id is impossible (or not worth it, anyway) in the situation, though, as data is not added in any guaranteed order. –  Scott Stafford Jan 25 '11 at 15:05

Other Answers, for example, SkipWhile etc. very very slow. Good luck ^^

//Current Record
var query
= (from item in db.Employee
   where item.UserName.Equals(_username)
   select item).SingleOrDefault();

//Next Record
var query
= (from item in db.Employee
   where item.UserName.CompareTo(_username) > 0
   select item).FirstOrDefault();

//Previous Record
var query
= (from item in db.Employee
   where item.UserName.CompareTo(_username) < 0
   orderby item.UserName Descending
   select item).FirstOrDefault();
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Almost the same, but the SQL query plan might be different.

var q = 
 from asset in Assets
 where asset.Id == assetID
 select new 
 {
     Previous = asset.Orders.where(a => a.Date == asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date < myDate).Max(x => x.Date)).FirstOrDefault(),
     Current = asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date == myDate).FirstOrDefault(),
     Next = asset.Orders.where(a => a.Date == asset.Orders.Where(x => x.Date > myDate).Min(x => x.Date)).FirstOrDefault()
 };
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