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I know that the order of a dictionary is undefined, MSDN says so:

For purposes of enumeration, each item in the dictionary is treated as a KeyValuePair structure representing a value and its key. The order in which the items are returned is undefined.

Thats fine, but if I have two instances of a dictionary, each with the same content, will the order be the same?

I'm guessing so because as I understand, the order is determined by the hash of the keys, and if the two dictionaries have the same keys, they have the same hashes, and therefore the same order...

... Right?

Thanks!

Andy.

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1  
All good points, I'm not considering every relying on this, I'm just trying to bug hunt why some behaviour in an application isn't determinate and I guess this may be a very good reason! –  Andy Jan 24 '11 at 18:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No it is not guaranteed to be the same order. Imagine the scenario where you had several items in the Dictionary<TKey, TValue> with the same hash code. If they are added to the two dictionaries in different orders it will result in different orders in enumeration .

Consider for example the following (equality conforming) code

class Example
{
    public char Value;
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return 1;
    }
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return obj is Example && ((Example)obj).Value == Value;
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var e1 = new Example() { Value = 'a' };
        var e2 = new Example() { Value = 'b' };
        var map1 = new Dictionary<Example, string>();
        map1.Add(e1, "1");
        map1.Add(e2, "2");

        var map2 = new Dictionary<Example, string>();
        map2.Add(e2, "2");
        map2.Add(e1, "1");

        Console.WriteLine(map1.Values.Aggregate((x, y) => x + y));
        Console.WriteLine(map2.Values.Aggregate((x, y) => x + y));
    }
}

The output of running this program is

12
21
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Thanks for the example, really helps to illustrate the point, I guess I wasn't clear though but I mean't assuming the values were added in the same order. Either way, I know that I can't rely on it. –  Andy Jan 25 '11 at 8:47

Short version: No.

Long version:

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestDictionary()
    {
        Dictionary<String, Int32> d1 = new Dictionary<string, int>();
        Dictionary<String, Int32> d2 = new Dictionary<string, int>();

        d1.Add("555", 1);
        d1.Add("abc2", 2);
        d1.Add("abc3", 3);
        d1.Remove("abc2");
        d1.Add("abc2", 2);
        d1.Add("556", 1);

        d2.Add("555", 1);
        d2.Add("556", 1);
        d2.Add("abc2", 2);
        d2.Add("abc3", 3);

        foreach (var i in d1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
        foreach (var i in d2)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
    }

Output:

[555, 1]
[abc2, 2]
[abc3, 3]
[556, 1]

[555, 1]
[556, 1]
[abc2, 2]
[abc3, 3]
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If MSDN says its undefined you have to rely on that. The thing with undefined is it means that the implementation of the dictionary is allowed to store it in whatever order it wants. This means that a programmer should never make any assumptions about the order. I would probably assume personally without looking that the order of the elements in the dictionary would depend on the order they went in but I could be wrong. Whatever the answer is though if you are wanting some behaviour whereby the order is the same for both then you are doing it wrong.

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"if the two dictionaries have the same keys, they have the same hashes, and therefore the same order..."

I do not think this is the case. Even if it might be true, I would not rely on this. If it's true it is an implementation detail, that might change, or be different on different implementations of the CLR or BCL (Mono comes to mind).

The Microsoft Dictionary implementation is a little complex, but from looking at the code for 5 minutes, I am willing to guess that the sequence of enumeration will be based on how the dictionary got to it's current state, including the number of resizes and insertion order.

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If the spec says the order is "undefined", you can't depend on the order without explicitly ordering it. The underlying implementation may be changed at any time with a new release or service pack, just for starters. Your dictionary may be upcast from any number of concrete implementations as well.

And underlying implementation may be sensitive to the order of operations applied. Adding keys 'a', 'b' and 'c', in that order may result in a different data structure than adding the same set of keys in a different order (say, 'b','c', and 'a'). Deletions may likewise affect the data structure.

A straight binary tree, for instance, if used as the data structure behind a dictionary, if the keys are added in order, the net result is a highly unbalanced tree that is essentially a linked list. The tree will be more balance if nodes are inserted in random order.

And some data structure morph as operations are performed. If, for instance, a dictionary is implemented with the underlying data structure being a red/black tree, tree nodes will be split/rotated in order to keep the tree balanced as inserts and deletes occur. So the actual data structure then is highly dependent on the order of operations, even if the final contents are the same.

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I don't know the specifics of Microsoft's implementation, but in general your assumption holds only if there are no two items in the dictionary that hash to the same value or if those entries that do collide are added in the same order.

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