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Why won't the Scala compiler apply tail call optimization unless a method is final?

For example, this:

class C {
    @tailrec def fact(n: Int, result: Int): Int =
        if(n == 0)
            result
        else
            fact(n - 1, n * result)
}

results in

error: could not optimize @tailrec annotated method: it is neither private nor final so can be overridden

What exactly would go wrong if the compiler applied TCO in a case such as this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Consider the following interaction with the REPL. First we define a class with a factorial method:

scala> class C {
         def fact(n: Int, result: Int): Int =
         if(n == 0) result else fact(n - 1, n * result)
       }
defined class C

scala> (new C).fact(5, 1)
res11: Int = 120

Now let's override it in a subclass to double the superclass's answer:

scala> class C2 extends C {
         override def fact(n: Int, result: Int): Int = 2 * super.fact(n, result)
       }
defined class C2

scala> (new C).fact(5, 1)
res12: Int = 120

scala> (new C2).fact(5, 1)

What result do you expect for this last call? You might be expecting 240. But no:

scala> (new C2).fact(5, 1)
res13: Int = 7680

That's because when the superclass's method makes a recursive call, the recursive call goes through the subclass.

If overriding worked such that 240 was the right answer, then it would be safe for tail-call optimization to be performed in the superclass here. But that isn't how Scala (or Java) works.

Unless a method is marked final, it might not be calling itself when it makes a recursive call.

And that's why @tailrec doesn't work unless a method is final (or private).

UPDATE: I recommend reading the other two answers (John's and Rex's) as well.

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1  
thanks amacleod, drdozer, and others on #scala –  Seth Tisue Jan 24 '11 at 18:27
    
Great explanation! –  soc Jan 25 '11 at 10:45
    
Might be worth spelling out that "might not be calling itself" is a Scala-specific issue that has nothing to do with tail call elimination in general. All of these tail calls would be eliminated in SML, OCaml, F# etc. –  Jon Harrop Jan 31 '12 at 15:49
    
How could you write the fact parent and child such that the child's intended 2 × parent's fact? –  Kevin Meredith Apr 16 at 2:51
    
@KevinMeredith: I think that'd make a great separate question. –  Seth Tisue Apr 16 at 3:15

Recursive calls might be to a subclass instead of to a superclass; final will prevent that. But why might you want that behavior? The Fibonacci series doesn't provide any clues. But this does:

class Pretty {
  def recursivePrinter(a: Any): String = { a match {
    case xs: List[_] => xs.map(recursivePrinter).mkString("L[",",","]")
    case xs: Array[_] => xs.map(recursivePrinter).mkString("A[",",","]")
    case _ => a.toString
  }}
}
class Prettier extends Pretty {
  override def recursivePrinter(a: Any): String = { a match {
    case s: Set[_] => s.map(recursivePrinter).mkString("{",",","}")
    case _ => super.recursivePrinter(a)
  }}
}

scala> (new Prettier).recursivePrinter(Set(Set(0,1),1))
res8: String = {{0,1},1}

If the Pretty call was tail-recursive, we'd print out {Set(0, 1),1} instead since the extension wouldn't apply.

Since this sort of recursion is plausibly useful, and would be destroyed if tail calls on non-final methods were allowed, the compiler inserts a real call instead.

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thanks Rex. that's an excellent point. –  Seth Tisue Jan 24 '11 at 18:43
2  
Well, when I read yours, I was left with the impression, "Scala fails to optimize so it can produce weird, crazy results instead of exactly what you want." So I thought I'd better provide another example that made it a little clearer why 7680 is the "right" answer. –  Rex Kerr Jan 24 '11 at 19:01
    
"this sort of recursion is plausibly useful". Its the backbone of functional techniques like continuation passing style. –  Jon Harrop Jan 30 '12 at 22:08
    
@JonHarrop - Indeed. CPS and other functional techniques relying upon this are plausibly useful. –  Rex Kerr Jan 31 '12 at 4:06
    
FWIW, here is an example of it being used in the finance sector zbray.com/2011/11/02/… –  Jon Harrop Jan 31 '12 at 15:48

Let foo::fact(n, res) denote your routine. Let baz::fact(n, res) denone someone else's override of your routine.

The compiler is telling you that the semantics allow baz::fact() to be a wrapper, that MAY upcall (?) foo::fact() if it wants to. Under such a scenario, the rule is that foo::fact(), when it recurs, must activate baz::fact() rather than foo::fact(), and, while foo::fact() is tail-recursive, baz::fact() may not be. At that point, rather than looping on the tail-recursive call, foo::fact() must return to baz::fact(), so it can unwind itself.

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thanks, John. my answer focuses on what the result is, but you're right to also point out that the tail-call property is lost, too. –  Seth Tisue Jan 24 '11 at 18:42
    
Probably worth spelling out that they're both tail recursive and the problem is that Scala is only capable of tail call optimizing one of them (due to the lack of tail call elimination in the JVM). –  Jon Harrop Jan 30 '12 at 22:13

What exactly would go wrong if the compiler applied TCO in a case such as this?

Nothing would go wrong. Any language with proper tail call elimination will do this (SML, OCaml, F#, Haskell etc.). The only reason Scala does not is that the JVM does not support tail recursion and Scala's usual hack of replacing self-recursive calls in tail position with goto does not work in this case. Scala on the CLR could do this as F# does.

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hey mate can you tell me why f# blows up in this case ideone.com/VgJnR6 - mono on ideone fails with sigsegv and tryfsharp in win8 crashes IE –  OlegYch Aug 13 '13 at 1:06
    
@OlegYch Mono and TryFSharp don't do proper tail call elimination. Your program works fine on .NET when TCO is enabled. –  Jon Harrop Aug 13 '13 at 13:52
    
Thanks Jon, appreciate your feedback! –  OlegYch Aug 13 '13 at 14:58

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