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We have a requirement to upload large files (may be up to 200 MB) to SharePoint from a Java/J2EE application.

We know there are out of the box SharePoint web services that allows to upload files to SharePoint. However, our main concern is what happens if concurrent users upload files. For example, we would require to read a 200 MB file for each user on Java server (application server), before invoking SharePoint to send that data. Even if there are 5 concurrent users, the memory consumed would be around 1 GB, and there could be high CPU usage too. Are there any suggestions how to handle the server memory, concurrency of file uploads in this scenario?

I think one option is may be to use technologies like Flash/Flex which does not require another server (Java Application server) in between - however, wondering how this can be achieved in J2EE server?

http://servername/sitename/_vti_bin/copy.asmx

Thanks

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Why would the file uploads be captured entirely within memory? Wouldn't they be buffered such that most of the data is on disk at a given time? –  James Feb 2 '11 at 23:06
    
I need to upload the document to SharePoint using the SharePoint web service (Copy.CopyIntoItems). This method accepts the file byte stream of the complete file. Or please let me know if there is a way to upload file to SharePoint byte by byte. Probably, I can use Java/J2EE application to write the byte to a disk, then another batch job picking up the files from this temporary disk - but this would complicate the process. –  user243542 Feb 3 '11 at 20:20
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3 Answers

ok.. so this is what I understood:

  • You are trying to use Sharepoint Copy Service
  • And this service requires the stream to be base64encoded in the Soap envelope.
  • As the file size is huge your SOAP request size becomes huge and demands more memory

I can think of 2 options:

  1. I dont know much about sharepoint, if it is possible to give location of file to be uploaded than sending bytes, then you can ftp/sftp the file to the sharepoint server and then call a webservice with the location of the file.

  2. In Java instead of using the out of the box api for SOAP messages, write a custom api. When user uploads the file save it as base64 encoded file. And then your custom api will create a soap message and stream it instead of loading everything in memory.

For option 2: try if you can send the file content as a soap attachment. its gets a bit complex if you want to send it as part of the message.

Try it out. I am not sure if works.

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SharePoint does not provide out of the box services as mentioned in Option 1. Even with 2nd option - we do not have much control on how we can upload document to SharePoint because we would like to use out of the box web service provided by SharePoint. One option we have is to use Flash/Flex to upload files from client to SharePoint server directly using the web service; so that there is no application server in the middle to process the documents. –  user243542 Feb 7 '11 at 19:48
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SharePoint supports WebDAV protocol for reading / writing files.

You can use many WebDAV libraries that would not require loading complete file in memory.

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May be I missed something... but when you let users upload files to your J2EE server, wouldn't you be writing the uploaded content to a temp directory first and then stream it to the server?

As you write the buffers immediately to the disk, you wouldnt have any issues with memory limitations.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to upload the document to SharePoint using the SharePoint web service (Copy.CopyIntoItems). This method accepts the file byte stream of the complete file. Or please let me know if there is a way to upload file to SharePoint byte by byte. Probably, I can use Java/J2EE application to write the byte to a disk, then another batch job picking up the files from this temporary disk - but this would complicate the process. –  user243542 Feb 3 '11 at 20:21
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