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I'm having an issue with a C++ library I'm trying to write. It's the usual setup, one cpp file, one header file. I want the header file to only expose the parts that are meant to be used (I have an abstract base class for instance, I don't want in the header file). So far, I'm just working with a single file (I assume this should make no difference, as includes are done by the preprocessor, which doesn't care about anything).

You'll note that the "header file" is spread over two spots, before and after the header implementation file.

#include <stdio.h>

// lib.h
namespace foo {
    template <class T> class A;
}

// lib.cpp
namespace foo {
    template <class T> class A {
        private:
        T i;
        public:
        A(T i) {
            this->i = i;
        }

        T returnT() {
            return i;
        }
    };
};

// lib.h
namespace foo {
    template <class T> T A<T>::returnT();
}

// foo.cpp
void main() {
    foo::A<int> a = foo::A<int>(42);
    printf("a = %d",a.returnT());
}

So, naturally, I'd like my header file to contain just

namespace foo {
    template <class T> class A;
    template <class T> T A<T>::returnT();
}

But my compiler does not like this (it complains that returnT is not a member of foo::A<T>. The reason I don't want to put the class declaration itself in the header is that then it would (as I understand it), contain all the private and similar stuff, which I'd like to hide.

Maybe it's just me, but the following header file seems "bad", at least as an "interface specification." It exposes some of the internals of A, which a user of the lib would not need to know about.

// lib.h
namespace foo {
    template <class T> class A {
        private:
        int i;
        public:
        A(T);
        T returnT();
    };
}

// lib.cpp
namespace foo {
    template <class T> A<T>::A(T i) {
        this->i = i;
    }
    template <class T> T A<T>::returnT() {
        return i;
    }
};

Is this the accepted way of doing it? I'd like a more abstract header file, if at all possible.

share|improve this question
    
Is the entire first block of code the header file code? I'm confused because there are two blocks labelled "lib.h" but then you have a main function there... –  James McNellis Jan 24 '11 at 18:36
    
Get used to disclose your implementation details when you write the word template. This is how it works, period. You can make "implementation header files" that you #include into your main header, but you have to ship the source. –  Alexandre C. Jan 24 '11 at 18:37
    
@James McNellis: The first code piece (the grey block) is just a test file I used to keep everything in one file. The idea is that this would be split out into three files, lib.h, lib.cpp and main.cpp, the last just being the "user" test, calling into lib. The problem just is that to get something that looks like what I want, I need to split the header, into one part above the implementation code, and to one part below it. Does that make sense? –  Svend Jan 24 '11 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two problems with .cpp files you are dealing here:

I. If you want to put an instance of that class on the stack (like you do in your main()) the compiler needs to know the size of the class (to allocate enough memory). For that it needs to know the members and by that the complete declaration.

The only way to hide the class' layout away is to built up an interface and a factory method/function and put the instance on the heap in the factory.

As an example (without the template; see below to know why):

namespace foo {
  class IA {
    public:
      virtual ~IA();
      virtual int returnT() = 0;

      static IA *Create();
  };
}

In your .cpp you then do:

namespace foo {
  class A : public IA {
    private:
      int i;
    public:
      A() : 
        i(0) {
      }
      virtual ~A() {
      }
      virtual int returnT() {
        return i;
      }
  };
  IA::~IA() {
  }

  IA *IA::Create() {
    return new A();
  }
}

BTW: Using smart pointers would be suggested...

II. Since you are using a template the method definitions must be either visible via header file or explicitly instantiated for a specific set of types.

So you can split up your code into a lib.h and a lib_impl.h:

lib.h:

namespace foo {
  template <typename T> class IA {
    public:
      virtual ~IA() {
      }
      virtual T returnT() = 0;

      static IA *Create();
  };
}

lib_impl.h:

namespace foo {
  template <typename T> class A : public IA<T> {
    private:
      T i;
    public:
      A() : 
        i(T()) {
      }
      virtual ~A() {
      }
      virtual T returnT() {
        return i;
      }
  };

  template <typename T> IA<T> *IA<T>::Create() {
    return new A<T>();
  }
}

so you include the lib_impl.h where ever you need the impleemntations. To use the explicit instantiations add a lib.cpp and just let that file allow to include lib_impl.h:

lib.cpp:

#include <lib_impl.h>
namespace foo {
  template class IA<int>;
  template class A<int>;
  template class IA<float>;
  template class A<float>;
  template class IA<char>;
  template class A<char>;
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
To add to this great answer, you can also #include lib_impl.h at the end of lib.h. This way, from the user's point-of-view, a quick look into lib.h will reveal the essentials (the interface) without requiring a look at the details in lib_impl.h nor having to do any special work to figure out when lib_impl.h should be included or not. –  Mikael Persson Jan 24 '11 at 20:09
    
This approach (also outlined in the FAQ) is what I've ended up going with. Smart pointers is not quite where I am however ;) –  Svend Jan 25 '11 at 8:44
    
I've a question. As I understand it, lib.cpp is used as a sort of "hinting" to the compiler, as to what templates to generate. The FAQ also mentions this approach (item 35.13), but what is this syntax doing specifically? Such as where can I look in Stroustrups book and learn something? –  Svend Jan 25 '11 at 10:40
    
To answer myself, this seems to called explicit instantiation I believe. Stroustrup book doesn't seem to talk about this in the context it is used here however. –  Svend Jan 25 '11 at 10:49
    
@Svend: The explicit instantiation generates all methods for the specific instantiated template in the compile unit of lib.cpp. So a consumer of the template class can use i.e. A<char> without including the lib_impl.h since the linker can resolve the methods from the lib.dll/lib.so. The advantage is: Hidden implementation and faster over-all compilation if used often. The drawback: You cannot use A<MyClass>... –  Rüdiger Stevens Jan 26 '11 at 18:33

You cannot separate the definition of a template from its declaration. They both have to go into the header file together.

For "why?" I recommend reading "Why can't I separate the definition of my templates class from its declaration and put it inside a .cpp file?".


I may have misread your question. To address what may also be your question, this is not valid:

namespace foo {
    template <class T> class A;     
    template <class T> T A<T>::returnT(); 
} 

It is not valid for the same reason that this is not valid:

namespace foo {
    class A;
    int A::returnT();
} 

Member functions must be declared inside the definition of the class.

share|improve this answer
    
The FAQ makes it painfully clear, what the problem is. Thanks! –  Svend Jan 25 '11 at 8:16
    
@Svend: Sure. I'm glad to have been able to help. –  James McNellis Jan 25 '11 at 15:23

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