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I am currently working on an c# application that minimizes and combines javascript/css asynchronously in the background to load on to the page which completed. Once the combined minimized file(s) are created, they are saved on to disk and all subsequent requests to the page will load this file.

The reason for this is to assist with performance on the page. I have a concern though, what if the combined file is large, eg 200 kb. Would it be better to combine in to 2 files if this was the case and have 2 separate http requests? The file will be gzipped and cached.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well, there are two main schools of thought.

The first, is reduce the number of HTTP requests as much as possible. This would say to reduce ALL CSS files down to one monster. It's better to download 400kb once, than multiple 50kb files. (and the same for JS).

The other is to combine where necessary, but no further. If you have 100kb of CSS that's only needed on one section of the site, there's no reason to slow the rest of the site down for your users. This is especially true for JS since there are lots of sites that include jQuery (for example) on every page because 10% of the site uses it.

My take on it is a combination of the two. If I use code on about 50% of the site or more, I include it in the "master" file. If the code is small (less than 5kb or 10kb), I include it in the master file. Otherwise I split it to separate files.

The whole reason for any of this is to make the user experience better. You could do a giant brute force and load all css and JS in 2 respective files every page load (sure it would be cached). But if the landing page doesn't need 50% of that code, you're needlessly slowing down the page with the biggest impact.

And that's why I believe that the best solution to this problem is to have a human analyze the situation. They can look for duplicates and abstractions. They can look at the needs of the page/site and determine the best scenario. Unless you want to make your program do that (which would be difficult), it's not going to give the best result (but then again, there is a difference between good and good-enough)...

That's my $0.02 anyway...

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Thanks for the information on this. I have combined all the javascript that is required on a page, and only the javascript used on the page is loaded. There is only 1 http request for this. However the file size is 98KB. Is this too large though? All the data in the 98KB is required and minimized. I presume based on your information its better to have 1 http request of size 98KB than 2 of 20KB & 78KB? –  amateur Jan 26 '11 at 23:45
    
@Niall: That's correct. 1 x 98kb is far better than 2 that total 98kb. In fact, in general 98kb isn't bad in total. I typically recommend 200kb total page size for first pages as it's quite quick for broadband users to load, and pretty fast for dial-up users (about 6 seconds on an optimal dial-up connection). Anything more than that and you start alienating your dial-up users (which may not be a big negative depending on your target audience)... –  ircmaxell Jan 27 '11 at 8:46

Your best best is to reduce the number of files, this is because of the fact that you can only have __ requests open per domain name doing simultaneous downloads. So if you break it into two requests, you are using more of that allotment than you need.

Overall, you really want to reduce the total number of requests.

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Google's documentation about page speed recommends the following:

Combine external JavaScript

Recommendations

Partition files optimally. Here are some rules of thumb for combining your JavaScript files in production:

  • Partition the JavaScript into 2 files: one JS containing the minimal code needed to render the page at startup; and one JS file containing the code that isn't needed until the page load has completed.
  • Serve as few JavaScript files from the document <head> as possible, and keep the size of those files to a minimum.
  • Serve JavaScript of a rarely visited component in its own file.
  • Serve the file only when that component is requested by a user. For small bits of JavaScript code that shouldn't be cached, consider inlining that JavaScript in the HTML page itself.

Combine external CSS

Recommendations

  • Partition the CSS into 2 files each: one CSS file containing the minimal code needed to render the page at startup; and one CSS file containing the code that isn't needed until the page load has completed.
  • Serve CSS of a rarely visited component in its own file. Serve the file only when that component is requested by a user.
  • For CSS that shouldn't be cached, consider inlining it.
  • Don't use CSS @import from a CSS file.
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