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I am using jQuery.queue() for the first time and haven't quite grasped it. Could someone please point out what im doing wrong?

Looking in firebug I am still seeing my POST requests firing at the same time - so I'm wondering if I'm calling dequeue() in the wrong place.

Also - how can I get the queue length? Thanks!

The reason I need to queue these requests is that it gets fired on click of a button. And its possible for the user to click multiple buttons in quick succession.

Tried to strip out the basic structure of my code:

$("a.button").click(function(){
   $(this).doAjax(params);
});

// method
doAjax:function(params){ 

   $(document).queue("myQueueName", function(){
     $.ajax({
       type: 'POST',
       url: 'whatever.html',
       params: params,
       success: function(data){
         doStuff;

         $(document).dequeue("myQueueName");
       }
     });
   });

}

Thanks in advance for any help.

share|improve this question
1  
This answer, also on StackOverflow, gives a great set of examples, including its use with ajax calls. –  boyetboy Jan 24 '11 at 19:01
    
I did actually try this approach - but i couldn't get this to work. I see it doesn't use a dequeue() and wondered if this may have been my problem? –  MBax Jan 24 '11 at 19:08
    
I guess next() is doing the same thing as dequeue? –  MBax Jan 24 '11 at 19:08
    
Yep, next() does the same thing. It's passed in by the queue logic when your function is called. –  boyetboy Jan 24 '11 at 22:51

6 Answers 6

You problem here is, that .ajax() fires an asyncronous running Ajax request. That means, .ajax() returns immediately, non-blocking. So your queue the functions but they will fire almost at the same time like you described.

I don't think the .queue() is a good place to have ajax requests in, it's more intended for the use of fx methods. You need a simple manager.

var ajaxManager = (function() {
     var requests = [];

     return {
        addReq:  function(opt) {
            requests.push(opt);
        },
        removeReq:  function(opt) {
            if( $.inArray(opt, requests) > -1 )
                requests.splice($.inArray(opt, requests), 1);
        },
        run: function() {
            var self = this,
                oriSuc;

            if( requests.length ) {
                oriSuc = requests[0].complete;

                requests[0].complete = function() {
                     if( typeof(oriSuc) === 'function' ) oriSuc();
                     requests.shift();
                     self.run.apply(self, []);
                };   

                $.ajax(requests[0]);
            } else {
              self.tid = setTimeout(function() {
                 self.run.apply(self, []);
              }, 1000);
            }
        },
        stop:  function() {
            requests = [];
            clearTimeout(this.tid);
        }
     };
}());

This is far away from being perfect, I just want to demonstrate the way to go. The above example could be used in a way like

$(function() {
    ajaxManager.run(); 

    $("a.button").click(function(){
       ajaxManager.addReq({
           type: 'POST',
           url: 'whatever.html',
           data: params,
           success: function(data){
              // do stuff
           }
       });
    });
});
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the proper diagnosis. –  nathan gonzalez Jan 24 '11 at 18:58
    
ha, just realized you've named your function the same as the plugin i'm suggesting. –  nathan gonzalez Jan 24 '11 at 18:59
    
@nathan: thanks, oh indeed - didn't know about your post, I was 4 minutes ahead :) –  jAndy Jan 24 '11 at 19:01
    
Okay - i understand why they were all firing at once thanks. I'm going to look into your suggestion of the handler. When would you suggest just using an existing plugin as @nathan suggested, or writing a handler like this? –  MBax Jan 24 '11 at 19:07
4  
@MBax: I don't know the plugin, but I always prefer to do things on my own, for flexibility, knowledge and coolness :-) –  jAndy Jan 24 '11 at 19:24

i had a similar issue,

if its not that import to you that the ajax-call is async (even if this is the "a" of ajax) you can simply tell jQuery to do the ajax-request not async. this worked for me and doesn't bring the need for a bigger workaround.

    $.ajax({
       ...
      async: false
    });

i should mention that this is deprecated since jQuery 1.8 and it wont work with dataType:'jsonp'.

share|improve this answer

I needed to do this for an unknown number of ajax calls. The answer was to push each into an array and then use:

$.when.apply($, arrayOfDeferreds).done(function () {
    alert("All done");
});
share|improve this answer

I also had to do this within a solution i had and I found I could do it this way:

//A variable for making sure to wait for multiple clicks before emptying.
var waitingTimeout; 

$("a.button").click(function(){
   $(this).doAjax(params);
   clearTimeout(waitingTimeout);
   waitingTimeout = setTimeout(function(){noMoreClicks();},1000);
});

// method
doAjax:function(params){ 

   $(document).queue("myQueueName", function(next){
     $.ajax({
       type: 'POST',
       url: 'whatever.html',
       data: params,
       contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
       dataType: "json",
       success: function(data){
         doStuff;
         next();
       },
       failure: function(data){
         next();
       },
       error: function(data){
         next();
       }
     });
   });

}

function noMoreClicks(){
    $(document).dequeue("myQueueName");
}

by using the next() callback that is passed in the queue function you can dequeue the next operation. So by putting the next in the handlers for the ajax, you effectively make the ajax calls asynchronous to the browser and the render or paint thread of the browser, but make them synchronous or serialized to each other.

Here is a very basic example. In the example fiddle. Click the button once and wait a second. You will see that the time out triggers and the single operation happens. Next click the button as fast as you can (or faster than one second) and you will see that all the times you click the button, the operations are queued and then only after waiting a second do they hit the page and fade in one after the other.

The beauty of this is that if the queue is already emptying, any operations you add to it while it is emptying are placed on the end and then just processed when the time comes.

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I needed to do a similar thing so thought I'd post my solution here.

Basically what I've got is a page which lists projects on shelves which all have distinctive criteria. I wanted to load the shelves one by one rather than altogether to get some content to the user quicker which they could look at whilst the rest loads.

Basically I stored the ID of each shelf in a JS array which I use when calling them from PHP.

I then created a recursive function which will pop the first index out of the array each time its called and request the shelf for the popped id. Once I have the response from the $.get() or $.post() whichever I prefer to use I then call the recursive function from within the callback.

Here's an elaboration in code:

// array of shelf IDs
var shelves = new Array(1,2,3,4);

// the recursive function
function getShelfRecursive() {

    // terminate if array exhausted
    if (shelves.length === 0)
        return;

    // pop top value
    var id = shelves[0];
    shelves.shift();

    // ajax request
    $.get('/get/shelf/' + id, function(){
         // call completed - so start next request
         getShelfRecursive();
    });
}

// fires off the first call
getShelfRecursive();
share|improve this answer

I found the above solutions kind of complicated, plus I needed to alter the request just before sending (to update a fresh data token).

So I put this one together - https://gist.github.com/2470554

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3  
Please put the code (or at least relevant part of it) here as well. For all we know, github might be down tomorrow to never come back and this post will become meaningless. –  Shadow Wizard Dec 16 '12 at 11:37

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