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I've seen a couple of documents on how to collect the data from a HTML statement in Django but none of them were very clear to me. Does anybody have a real working example to share?

In my case I have something like this in my template file:

<select title="my_options">
   <option value="1">Select value 1</option>
   <option value="2">Select value 2</option>
</select>

What goes in the views.py in order to collect the selected value? Thank you!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If it's a GET request, request.GET['my_options']. If it's a POST, then request.POST['my_options']. This will be a string, either "1" or "2" (or "<script>alert('I hacked you!')</script>")

Either way, it's probably better to use the Django forms framework to save you the hassle of writing the HTML, and sanitizing the returned values.

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1  
I second using Django Forms, even if you want to write the HTML yourself (which the docs will help you do). –  Alex Kuhl Jan 24 '11 at 20:12
    
In that case what would be a good example for the <select> using the django forms? My page has only one form with a select (like the one in the question) and a submit button. –  avatar Jan 24 '11 at 20:35
    
If I do request.POST['my_options'] i get this error: list index out of range. –  avatar Jan 24 '11 at 20:45
1  
Create a Form class with a ChoiceField, say my_options. Stuff it into your template context. Then your entire <select> tag boils down to {{ form.my_options }}. Process the form as in the example from the documentation. –  Thomas Jan 24 '11 at 20:46
    
request.POST should be a dict-like object. I don't think it could ever throw an IndexError unless you're doing something very strange. –  Thomas Jan 24 '11 at 20:48

Manage data via POST

def yourView(request):
    # Use '.get('id', None)' in case you don't receive it, avoid getting error
    selected_option = request.POST.get('my_options', None)  

    if selected_option:
        # Do what you need with the variable

One thing that may be useful with forms in Django is to make different things if you make a POST to the URL or just load it:

def yourView(request):

    if request.POST:  # If this is true, the view received POST
        selected_option = request.POST.get('my_options', None)
        if selected_option:
            # Do what you need to do with the variables
        return render_to_response(...)

return render_to_response(...)

There are 2 render_to_response in case you need to do different things if the view was just loaded or receive a POST.

Manage data via GET

def yourView(request):
    # Use '.get('id', None)' in case you don't receive it, avoid getting error
    selected_option = request.GET.get('my_options', None)  

    if selected_option:
        # Do what you need with the variable
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