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so I'm trying to make this work and I can't seem to know why it doesn't work

demo code;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var myVar = new List<parent >();
        myVar.Add(new parent() { id = "id1", blah1 = "blah1", c1 = new child() { blah2 = "blah2", blah3 = "blah3" } });
        myVar.Add(new parent() { id = "id1", blah1 = "blah1", c1 = new child() { blah2 = "blah2", blah3 = "blah3" } });

        var test = myVar.Distinct();

        Console.ReadKey();

    }
}


public class parent : IEquatable<parent>
{
    public String id { get;set;}
    public String blah1 { get; set; }
    public child c1 { get; set; }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked // Overflow is fine, just wrap
        {
            int hash = 17;
            // Suitable nullity checks etc, of course :)
            hash = hash * 23 + id.GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + blah1.GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + (c1 == null ? 0 : c1.GetHashCode());
            return hash;
        }
    }

    public bool Equals(parent other)
    {
        return object.Equals(id, other.id) &&
            object.Equals(blah1, other.blah1) &&
            object.Equals(c1, other.c1);
    }

}

public class child : IEquatable<child>
{
    public String blah2 { get; set; }
    public String blah3 { get; set; }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked // Overflow is fine, just wrap
        {
            int hash = 17;
            // Suitable nullity checks etc, of course :)
            hash = hash * 23 + blah2.GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + blah3.GetHashCode();
            return hash;
        }
    }

    public bool Equals(child other)
    {
        return object.Equals(blah2, other.blah2) &&
            object.Equals(blah3, other.blah3);
    }

}
}

anyone could spot my error(s) ?

share|improve this question
3  
+1 for a complete example. –  SLaks Jan 24 '11 at 20:42
1  
What error are you getting? What is the intended behaviour? Executing your code simply displays nothing and exits when a key is pressed. –  jdmichal Jan 24 '11 at 20:44
    
@jdmichal, put a break point on console.readkey and look at test variable, it should say count = 1 not 2 –  Fredou Jan 24 '11 at 20:45
    
@jdmichal From the description one can safely assume the expectation is that Distinct() returns only one item, but in fact it does not –  BrokenGlass Jan 24 '11 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to override the Equals(object) method:

public override bool Equals(object obj) {
    return Equals(obj as parent);
}

The object.Equals method (unlike EqualityComparer<T>.Default) does not use the IEquatable interface. Therefore, when you write object.Equals(c1, other.c1), it doesn't call your Child.Equals(Child) method.

You don't absolutely need to do that for parent as well, but you really should.

share|improve this answer
    
Error 'ConsoleApplication1.parent.Equals(ConsoleApplication1.parent)': no suitable method found to override –  Fredou Jan 24 '11 at 20:44
    
@Fredou: I forgot to add the return type. –  SLaks Jan 24 '11 at 20:48
    
this would need to assume that c1 != null and EqualityComparer would not care, right? –  Fredou Jan 24 '11 at 20:53
    
@Fredou: Your primary Equals method needs to check that other isn't null. –  SLaks Jan 24 '11 at 20:55
1  
Checked MSDN. And it turns out one has to do both: "To compare a custom data type, you need to implement this interface [IEquatable<T>] and provide your own GetHashCode and Equals methods for the type." I am annoyed that MS keeps duplicating and triplicating, it's hard to know your type will always work! IComparable, IComparer, IEquatable, IEqualityComparer, Equals and GetHashCode - is that enough?!? –  The Dag Jan 21 '13 at 9:42

Either you do what SLaks suggests, or you use EqualityComparer<child>.Default in your parent class to use your IEquatable<child> implementation:

  public bool Equals(parent other)
  {
   return object.Equals(id, other.id) &&
    object.Equals(blah1, other.blah1) &&
    EqualityComparer<child>.Default.Equals(c1, other.c1);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
this work, now i need to know what is the best practice, implementing this or SLaks way –  Fredou Jan 24 '11 at 20:54
1  
You really should override Equals(object). Otherwise, you're likely to get other nasty surprises. –  SLaks Jan 24 '11 at 20:56
    
should override Equals(object): Agree. –  ulrichb Jan 24 '11 at 20:58
    
i wish i could accept 2 answers since this one work too, SLaks one is more bulletproof –  Fredou Jan 24 '11 at 21:02
    
Seems to me parent and child are probably both "entities". Why not derive both from a common base class that models only identity (the ID property), equality and comparison? Then when you need the third and later twenty-second type to do the same thing you don't end up with 23 copies of the code. Having a polymorphic way to identify objects can be really useful to other ends as well, e.g. O/R-mapping, caching, instrumentation/tracing, ... –  The Dag Jan 21 '13 at 9:46

When adding the calculating the hash you might want to try something like

hash ^= id.GetHashCode();

Not sure if that is what is causing your issue.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe his hashing is fine - and in any case, if it was bad it would lead to poor performance, not incorrect output (so long as the hash is deterministic, which it clearly is in this case). And the perf problem certainly wouldn't be noticeable with only 2 items. :) –  The Dag Jan 21 '13 at 9:35

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