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The following query gets the info that I need. However, I noticed that as the tables grow, my code gets slower and slower. I'm guessing it is this query. Can this written a different way to make it more efficient? I've heard a lot about using joins instead of subqueries, however, I don't "get" how to do it.

  SELECT * FROM

  (SELECT MAX(T.id) AS MAXid
  FROM transactions AS T 
  GROUP BY T.position
  ORDER BY T.position) AS result1,

  (SELECT T.id AS id, T.symbol, T.t_type, T.degree, T.position, T.shares, T.price, T.completed, T.t_date,
  DATEDIFF(CURRENT_DATE, T.t_date) AS days_past, 
  IFNULL(SUM(S.shares), 0) AS subtrans_shares,
  T.shares - IFNULL(SUM(S.shares),0) AS due_shares,

  (SELECT IFNULL(SUM(IF(SO.t_type = 'sell', -SO.shares, SO.shares )), 0) 
  FROM subtransactions AS SO WHERE SO.symbol = T.symbol) AS owned_shares

  FROM transactions AS T
  LEFT OUTER JOIN subtransactions AS S
  ON T.id = S.transid     
  GROUP BY T.id
  ORDER BY T.position) AS result2

  WHERE MAXid = id
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1  
Can you post your table's CREATE statements with indexes? –  Peter Bailey Jan 24 '11 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code:

  (SELECT MAX(T.id) AS MAXid
  FROM transactions AS T        [<--- here ]
  GROUP BY T.position
  ORDER BY T.position) AS result1,

  (SELECT T.id AS id, T.symbol, T.t_type, T.degree, T.position, T.shares, T.price, T.completed, T.t_date,
  DATEDIFF(CURRENT_DATE, T.t_date) AS days_past, 
  IFNULL(SUM(S.shares), 0) AS subtrans_shares,
  T.shares - IFNULL(SUM(S.shares),0) AS due_shares,

  (SELECT IFNULL(SUM(IF(SO.t_type = 'sell', -SO.shares, SO.shares )), 0) 
  FROM subtransactions AS SO WHERE SO.symbol = T.symbol) AS owned_shares

  FROM transactions AS T     [<--- here ]

Notice the [<---- here ] marks I added to your code.

The first T is not in any way related to the second T. They have the same correlation alias, they refer to the same table, but they're entirely independent selects and results.

So what you're doing in the first, uncorrelated, subquery is getting the max id for all positions in transactions.

And then you're joining all transaction.position.max(id)s to result2 (which result2 happens to be a join of all transaction.positions to subtransactions). (And the internal order by is pointless and costly, too, but that's not the main problem.)

You're joining every transaction.position.max(id) to every (whatever result 2 selects).

On Edit, after getting home: Ok, you're not Cartesianing, the "where MAXid = id" does join result1 to result2. But you're still rolling up all rows of transaction in both queries.

So you're getting a Cartesian join -- every result1 joined to every result2, unconditionally (nothing tells the database, for example, that they ought to be joined by (max) id or by position).

So if you have ten unique position.max(id)s in transaction, you're getting 100 rows. 1000 unique positions, a million rows. Etc.

When you want to write a complicated query like this, it's a lot easier if you compose it out of simpler views. in particular, you can test each view on its own, to make sure you're getting reasonable results, and then just join the views.

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You'll get terrible performance with views though, because of the use of an aggregate function (SUM()). –  Peter Bailey Jan 24 '11 at 21:13
    
Depends on the datanbase, Peter. In any case, better to be correct and slow and optimize the slow away later, than fast and incorrect. –  tpdi Jan 24 '11 at 21:15
    
I made the change that you suggested, however, there was no change in performance. It turns out it was not this particular query that was causing the huge slow down. It's another query that accesses different tables altogether. :( –  Drewneedshelp Jan 25 '11 at 22:07

I would split the query into smaller chunks, probably using a stored proc. For example get the max ids from transaction and put this in a table variable. Then join this with subtransactions. This will make it easier for you and the compiler to work out what is going on. Also without knowing what indexes are on your table it is hard to offer more advice

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Put a benchmark function in the code. Then time each section of the code to determine where the slow down is happening. Often times the slow down happens in a different query than you first guess. Determine the correct query that needs to be optimized before posting to stackoverflow.

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