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I have a class which represents a shape. The Shape class has a property called Angle. I want the setter for this property to automatically wrap the value into the range [0,359].

Unfortunately, a simple _Angle = value % 360; only works for positive numbers. In C#, -40 % 360 == -40. Google calc does it the way I want it. The value should be 320.

What's the most elegant solution in C#?

Here's the best way I've got so far:

     public double Angle {
        get { return _Angle; } 
        set {
            if ( value >= 0 ) {
                _Angle = value % 360;
            }
            else {
                _Angle = value - (360 * ((int)(value / 360) - 1)); 
            }
        }
    }

Edit:

Thanks guys, I now have:

     public double Angle {
        get { return _Angle; } 
        set {
            _Angle = (value % 360) + ((value < 0) ? 360 : 0);
        }
    }

..Which is a lot better :)

share|improve this question
1  
I would strongly discourage the use of the mod operation because hardware mod/division is slow. If you are able to scale your data to be a power of two, you can use a better solution that leverages bit masks. –  Trevor Boyd Smith Apr 6 '09 at 20:10
    
@TrevorBoydSmith: Is the C# compiler not allowed to optimize division and modulus to bit operations in case of integers? Can you optimize to bit operations in case of floating values? –  phresnel May 2 '12 at 14:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Although this is for Java, Java also has the same behavior for modulus. (i.e. -40 % 360 == -40).

The below code should return an answer from [0. 360), regardless of the given angle, positive or negative.

public class Mod
{
    public static int mod(int a, int b)
    {
    	if (a < 0)
    		return b + (a % b);
    	else
    		return a % b;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
    	System.out.println(mod(40, 360));	// 40
    	System.out.println(mod(-40, 360));	// 320
    	System.out.println(mod(-400, 360));	// 320
    }
}

Note that works when the given angle is past -360.

share|improve this answer
    
wow this is way too complex, you really don't need that extra if statement. –  Nick Berardi Jan 26 '09 at 3:11
    
Hah, of course! Much simpler than my code. –  Blorgbeard Jan 26 '09 at 3:13

While your solution works for the problem you have the algorithm is actually not identical to the one used by Google. It differs if you use a negative divisor.

public double GoogleModulo(double value, double divisor)
{
    long q = (long)Math.Floor(value / divisor);
    return value - q * divisor;
}

Console.WriteLine(GoogleModulo(  40,  360)); //   40
Console.WriteLine(GoogleModulo( -40,  360)); //  320
Console.WriteLine(GoogleModulo(-400,  360)); //  320
Console.WriteLine(GoogleModulo(  40, -360)); // -320

Check google's response to the last calculation here.

The algorithm is explained on wikipedia and attributed to Donald Knuth.

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This should give you the required results

public double Angle {
    get { return _Angle; }
    set { _Angle = value % 360 + (value % 360 < 0 : 360 : 0); }
}

I am assuming that 360 is degrees and you are trying to find where in the {0, 360} the angle lies.

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1  
(-1) you berate coobird for an unneeded if, and your code (incorrectly typed) uses ?:. Do you think the compiler does not generate a conditional for this? –  Robert Lamb Apr 14 '09 at 5:14
1  
Well (-1) back at you, it is not how the he used the IF statement, it was the fact he didn't satisfy what the poster asked for. he already had an IF statement, the author wanted to minimize his code, adding another method with an IF statement in it didn't do that –  Nick Berardi Apr 14 '09 at 13:32
1  
You actually have an extra % here too - value % 360 is less than zero iff value is less than zero. –  Blorgbeard May 23 '11 at 10:17

The mod operation is very slow. If possible replace with bit mask.

coobird's code is pretty good... but is very slow because it is doing a mod operation. If it is possible to scale your data to be within some power of two range, then you can improve the speed by approximately an order of magnitude ( at the very least 2 or 3 times faster ) by using a bit mask.

C code:

#define BIT_MASK (0xFFFF)
if (a < 0) {
    return b + (a & BIT_MASK);
} else {
    return a & BIT_MASK;
}

Feel free to make the #define something that is run time. And feel free to adjust the bit mask to be whatever power of two that you need. Like 0xFFFFFFFF or power of two you decide on implementing.

share|improve this answer
    
Unless the setting of the angle is taking a large amount of the CPU time I think isn't worth the effort. My current computer can do 450 millons modulus operations for small angles using 2 threads. Using Bit operations was 2.5-3 times faster. In 1 millon operations it saves only 1.5 millisecond. –  ggf31416 Apr 6 '09 at 21:45
    
If 2 to 3 x performance increase is not 'good', your problem sounds like you are doing premature optimization on something small ( i.e. wrapping numbers ) when you should be focusing on bigger problems. A lot of the stuff I work on has a hard real time deadline and must exec in micro secs of time. –  Trevor Boyd Smith Apr 7 '09 at 13:45
    
nice optimisation Trevor –  Anonymous Type Oct 19 '10 at 0:35

// go 'round once

set { _Angle = (value + 360) % 360 }

share|improve this answer
    
I thought of that, but what if a value less than -360 is passed? –  Blorgbeard Jan 26 '09 at 3:03
    
Yes, I am assuming here that the Angle is normalized at every update. –  ja. Jan 28 '09 at 20:41
(360 * Math.floor(Math.abs(value) / 360) + value) % 360
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If your values aren't going to be wildly out of the range you can do a little loop.

while (value < 0) {
  value = value + 360;
}
while (value > 360) {
  value = value - 360;
}
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