Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I don't know if "expand" is the right word, but here is what I would like to do =)

This script

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings; 
use strict;

my %HoA = (
    group1 => [ "user1", "user2" ],
    group2 => [ "group1", "user3" ],
    group3 => [ "group1", "group2" ],
    group4 => [ "group3", "user2" ],
    );

foreach my $group ( keys %HoA ) {
    print "$group: @{ $HoA{$group} }\n"
}

outputs

group1: user1 user2
group2: group1 user3
group3: group1 group2
group4: group3 user4

What I would like is to replace the groups in the array with the members. I.e. so the output and $HoA becomes

group1: user1 user2
group2: user1 user2 user3
group3: user1 user2 user3
group4: user1 user2 user3 user4

Perhaps "search and replace" and remove duplicates would be a better explanation of what I would like to do?

share|improve this question
2  
What if you have circular references? i.e what if group1 has group2, and group2 has group1? – CanSpice Jan 24 '11 at 21:52
    
Then I would like to ship that group, and print an error. – Sandra Schlichting Jan 24 '11 at 21:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming the data you have given, the following loop will create a new hash with the expanded arrays. This algorithm assumes that groups will resolve in sorted order (group2 will only depend on group1, group3 on 1 / 2, ...).

my %expanded;
for my $group (sort keys %HoA) {
    my %seen;
    $expanded{$group} = [
        grep {not $seen{$_}++}
        map {exists $expanded{$_} ? @{$expanded{$_}} : $_}
        @{$HoA{$group}}
    ];
    print "$group: @{ $expanded{$group} }\n"
}

which prints:

group1: user1 user2
group2: user1 user2 user3
group3: user1 user2 user3
group4: user1 user2 user3

If you can not assume a resolution order, the following is a bit brute force, but should work:

my %HoA = (
    group1 => [ "user1", "user2" ],
    group2 => [ "group1", "user3" ],
    group3 => [ "group1", "group2" ],
    group4 => [ "user5", "group5" ],
    group5 => [ "group3", "user2" ],
    );

my @to_expand = keys %HoA;

my %final;
my $tries = @to_expand;
to_expand: while (@to_expand and $tries) {
    my $next = shift @to_expand;

    my (@users, @groups);
    for (@{ $HoA{$next} }) {
        if (/^group/) {
            push @groups, $_;
        } else {
            push @users, $_;
        }
    }
    for my $group (@groups) {
        if (exists $final{$group}) {
            push @users, @{$final{$group}}
        } else {
            $tries--;
            push @to_expand, $next;
            next to_expand;
        }
    }
    $tries++;
    my %seen;
    $final{$next} = [grep {not $seen{$_}++} @users];
}
if (@to_expand) {
    print "error with groups: @to_expand\n";
}

for (sort keys %final) {
    print "$_: @{$final{$_}}\n";
}

which prints:

group1: user1 user2
group2: user3 user1 user2
group3: user1 user2 user3
group4: user5 user2 user1 user3
group5: user2 user1 user3

if there is an error (say group3 depends on group5), then you will get this output:

error with groups: group4 group5 group3
group1: user1 user2
group2: user3 user1 user2

There's probably a better algorithm out there for this.

share|improve this answer
    
I sadly can't make that assumption =( The groups can include each other in any combination. Very impressive script none the less! – Sandra Schlichting Jan 24 '11 at 22:18
1  
@Sandra => see the update which should cover your use case – Eric Strom Jan 24 '11 at 22:37
    
I understand what's going on until for my $group (@groups) {. Can you explain what $tries is used for? And how %seen works? – Sandra Schlichting Jan 25 '11 at 11:03
1  
@Sandra => $tries is a counter similar to $cont in leonbloy's answer and $deep in Axeman's. It is there to prevent these algorithms from going into an infinite loop (or deep recursion) when faced with circular or otherwise unresolvable dependency. The idea behind %seen is to keep an O(1) lookup table of already added users. This table is consulted for each user, and if that user has not been seen, they are added to the final list. – Eric Strom Jan 25 '11 at 21:44

This will throw an error if there are recursions - not foolproof and not ver elegant, though

use strict;

my %HoA = (
    group1 => [ "user1", "user2" ],
    group2 => [ "group1", "user3" ],
    group3 => [ "group1", "group2" ],
    group4 => [ "group3", "user2" ],
    );

my %ex=(); # expanded hash

foreach my $g ( keys %HoA ) { # first population
     $ex{$g} = {};
     AddArrayToHash($ex{$g},$HoA{$g});
}
my $goon = 1;
my $cont =0;
while($goon) { # iterate
    $goon=0;
    die "too many iterations RECURSIVE DEFINITION?" if($cont++ >10) ;
    foreach my $g ( keys %ex ) {
        foreach my $u ( keys %{$ex{$g}} ) {
            if($ex{$u}) {
                delete $ex{$g}->{$u};
                AddArrayToHash($ex{$g},[ keys %{$ex{$u}}] );
                $goon = 1;
            }
        }
    }
}

foreach my $group ( sort keys %ex ) {
    print "$group: " . join(" ",sort  keys %{$ex{$group}}) ."\n";
}

sub AddArrayToHash {
    my($refhash,$refarray)=@_;
    foreach my $e (@$refarray) {
        $refhash->{$e} = 1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I'd try something like

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings; 
use strict;

my %HoA = (
    group1 => [ "user1", "user2" ],
    group2 => [ "group1", "user3" ],
    group3 => [ "group1", "group2" ],
    group4 => [ "group3", "user2" ],
    );


my %users; 

foreach my $group ( sort keys %HoA ) {
  %users = ();

  print "$group: ";
  print_key($group, $HoA{$group});
  print join " ", sort keys %users;
  print "\n";
}

sub print_key {
  my $group = shift;

  foreach my $item (@{$HoA{$group}}) {
    if (exists $HoA{$item}) {
       print_key($item);
    }
    else {
       $users{$item}++;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

I don't know why people had to write so much code:

sub expand_group { 
    my ( $ref, $arref, $deep ) = @_;
    croak 'Deep Recursion!' if ++$deep > scalar( keys %$ref );
    return map { 
        exists $ref->{$_} ? expand_group( $ref, $ref->{$_}, $deep ) : $_ 
    } @$arref
    ;
}

sub expand_groups { 
    my ( $block, $group_ref ) = @_;
    while ( my ( $key, $val ) = each %$group_ref ) {
        $block->( $key, expand_group( $group_ref, $val, 1 ));
    }
}

expand_groups( sub { say join( ' ', @_ ); }, \%HoA );
share|improve this answer
    
There's no need for the &% prototype unless you want to call it like expand_groups { say join ' ', @_ } %HoA . – friedo Jan 25 '11 at 0:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.