Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) 
{
    long long x = test();
    printf("%lld\n", x);

    return 1;
}

long long test()
{   
    return 1111111111111111111;
} 

The output is 734294471 . If I replace the call to test() by a the number, the output is as I expect. I checked the value of x using a debugger and it wasn't set the to value returned by the function. What is going wrong?

I am using Visual Studio 2010 with the Visual C++ compiler.

share|improve this question
    
Your IDE is not relevant for this sort of question, and <stdio.h> is not a C++ header - if for some reason you needed to use the C-style IO library in C++ code, #include <cstdio> instead. –  Karl Knechtel Jan 24 '11 at 23:02
    
@Karl I mention the IDE as it might affect the compiler settings. –  Pulkit Sinha Jan 24 '11 at 23:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to declare test before you call it, otherwise C assumes it returns int.

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't this behaviour deprecated even in C nowadays? I would have expected a compilation error, actually. At least in C++ this -- using a function without having seen a declaration before -- is illegal. –  sellibitze Jan 24 '11 at 22:30
    
It should simply not compile if it is not declared before first use... –  tobyodavies Jan 24 '11 at 22:31
    
this solved it! Enabling all compiler warnings showed the warning. –  Pulkit Sinha Jan 24 '11 at 23:11
    
@tobyodavies: It is allowed in C89, which is the latest C standard that the Microsoft compiler supports. Presumably the OP is compiling this code as C, rather than C++. –  caf Jan 25 '11 at 0:01
    
@Pulkit, you posted on SO before reading the warnings from your compiler... seriously? –  tobyodavies Jan 25 '11 at 0:21

IIRC, a long long constant in C/C++ is suffixed by 'LL'.

long long test() {
    return 1111111111111111111LL;
}

Your compiler is treating your constant as a 32-bit long (if you take your constant modulo 2^32, you get 734294471.)

share|improve this answer
    
I thought one L made it a long and a second made it a long long –  tobyodavies Jan 24 '11 at 22:30
    
interesting suggestion but it didn't solve the problem –  Pulkit Sinha Jan 24 '11 at 23:06
1  
The type of an unsuffixed decimal constant is the first out of int, long int and long long int that can represent the number. The LL suffix is only required to force a smaller number that would otherwise be of type int or long to be of type long long instead. –  caf Jan 25 '11 at 0:04

Try adding LL to your return value:

long long test()
{   
    return 1111111111111111111LL;
} 
share|improve this answer

Add the suffix LL to your literal and see what happens. Presumably the compiler conberts the literal to an int. Are you getting any warnings from the compiler?

share|improve this answer
    
Don't presume, know. For a decimal integer constant without a suffix, the compiler picks the first out of int, long and long long that is long enough to represent the number. –  caf Jan 25 '11 at 0:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.