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unsigned int i;
for (i = 100; i <= 0; --i)
    printf("%d\n",i);
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4  
Prepare to be overhelmed by answers –  Anycorn Jan 24 '11 at 23:19
    
Depends on what you want the code to do... –  Michael Burr Jan 24 '11 at 23:21
2  
Welcome to StackOverflow –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 24 '11 at 23:21
    
@aaa: All of them different. :) –  James Jan 24 '11 at 23:21

9 Answers 9

Since i is unsigned, it will never be less than zero. Drop unsigned. Also, swap the <= for >=.

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Should be i >= 0 in the second condition in the loop if you want it to loop from 100 to 0.

That, and as others have pointed out, you'll need to change your definition of i to a signed integer (just int) because when the counter is meant to be -1, it will be some other positive number because you declared it an unsigned int.

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7  
"Should be i >= 0 if you want it to loop from 100 to 0." -- nope, i >= 0 would yield an infinite loop. –  Windows programmer Jan 24 '11 at 23:18
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Wow, 6 upvotes so far for this wrong answer. –  Windows programmer Jan 24 '11 at 23:20
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"Thought the loop kicked out when the second statement in the loop was false?" -- yes. "Should be i >= 0 in the second condition in the loop if you want it to loop from 100 to 0." -- still no, that would yield an infinite loop. –  Windows programmer Jan 24 '11 at 23:24
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@John: It won't ever be false. When it is equal to zero, it will get decremented and overflow back to maximum uint size. To infinity... –  James Jan 24 '11 at 23:24
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To infinity and beyond! –  SiegeX Jan 25 '11 at 1:44

Since i is unsigned, the expression i <= 0 is suspicious and equivalent to i == 0.

And the code won't print anything, since the condition i <= 0 is false on its very first evaluation.

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If the code is supposed to do nothing, nothing is wrong with it.

Assuming that you want it to print the loop index i from 100 to 1, you need to change i <= 0 to i > 0.

Because it is an unsigned int, you cant use i >= 0 because that will cause it to infinitely loop.

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+1 for the most complete answer that was right first time! –  Matthew Slattery Jan 24 '11 at 23:52
    
I don't completely agree. If the code is supposed to do nothing, there's way too much code there. :) –  Jack Leow Jan 25 '11 at 0:40

The loop checks for i <= 0;

i is never less-than-or-equal to zero. Its initial value is 100.

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Technically nothing is wrong with that code. The test for i <= 0 is strange since i is unsigned, but it's technically valid, true when i is 0 and false otherwise. In your case i never happens to be 0.

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I suspect you meant the test to be i > 0.

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Yes. Unfortunately it looks like you did his homework for him. –  Windows programmer Jan 24 '11 at 23:26

The <= 0 maybe? since it is false from the start

For loop

  • init: i = 100
  • test: i <= 0 // false on first pass

Change the test to i > 0 (100 times)

or i >= 0 (101 times) together with the declaration signed int i; so that it actually decreases down to -1. An unsigned int will go from 0 up to max-int (overflow).

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3  
you mean false –  swegi Jan 24 '11 at 23:17
    
>= 0 is wrong. –  Billy ONeal Jan 24 '11 at 23:22

If you want it to print all numbers from 100 down to 0 then you need

unsigned int i;
for (i = 100; i >= 0; --i)
    printf("%d\n",i);

The first time your loop ran in your original code, i was 100. The test '100 <= 0' failed and therefore nothing was showing.

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1  
There's also the issue that the loop won't kick out because i is declared unsigned. See the discussion in my answer. –  John Jan 24 '11 at 23:39

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