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Is there any way to make this run faster and still do the same thing?

#include <iostream>

int box[80][20];

void drawbox()
{
    for(int y = 0; y < 20; y++)
    {
        for(int x = 0; x < 80; x++)
        {
            std::cout << char(box[x][y]);
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    drawbox();
    return(0);
}

IDE: DEV C++ || OS: Windows

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9  
Probably be faster to build up a string and output that once, or once per outer loop, which'd be 1 or 20 couts, rather than 20*80=1600 –  Marc B Jan 25 '11 at 2:17
4  
@Marc B: A buffered I/O library is supposed to take care of that for you. Unfortunately, C++ iostreams are dog slow at both buffering and I/O. Look at the questions I've asked if you want to see some nice benchmarks showing just how miserable they are. –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '11 at 2:19
1  
@Marc B: Why not make that a real answer? –  Drew Hall Jan 25 '11 at 2:21
1  
Buffering helps with the actual I/O itself but function calls are generally not cost-free. Twenty outputs with eighty characters each will almost certainly be faster that sixteen hundred with one character each. Not because it's actually sending those character to a device, just because it's constructing and tearing down stack frames, among other things. –  paxdiablo Jan 25 '11 at 2:30
1  
@Drew: because I was just guessing. I've never written so much as line 1 of a C++ program in my life. –  Marc B Jan 25 '11 at 3:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As Marc B said in the comments, putting the output into a string first should be faster:

int box[80][20];

void drawbox()
{
    std::string str = "";
    str.reserve(80 * 20);

    for(int y = 0; y < 20; y++)
    {
        for(int x = 0; x < 80; x++)
        {
            str += char(box[x][y]);
        }
    }

    std::cout << str << std::flush;
}
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12  
oh, do preallocate that string. std::string doesn't necessarily have optimized allocation patterns like say std::vector. –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '11 at 2:30
    
@Ben Voigt: I'd be very disappointed if it was necessary... this definitely sounds like a quality of implementation issue... –  Matthieu M. Jan 25 '11 at 7:39
2  
@ Matthieu M: I doubt that any default string implementation reserves 1600 bytes. Thus it is likely there will be multiple re-allocations before finish writing. Just a good idea to pre-reserve the space required. –  Loki Astari Jan 25 '11 at 8:39

Sure, use putchar from stdio.h.

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1  
This was not any faster. –  Mark Jan 25 '11 at 2:21
    
@Mark: really? Are you sure it's your program that's the bottleneck and not the console window? Can you check if it's faster when output is redirected to a file? –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '11 at 2:26
    
The issue here is not using C++ vs. C. (And in fact, in his example it would be putchar() from cstdio). The issue is printing data for every character. –  BjoernD Jan 25 '11 at 2:26
1  
@Bjoern: putchar is buffered, it should be quite fast compared to actually drawing the text on the screen. –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '11 at 2:27
2  
C++ io functions are buffered as well. –  Ed S. Jan 25 '11 at 2:29

The obvious solution is to declare the box array differently:

char box[20][81];

Then you can cout a row at a time. If you can't do this for whatever reason, then there's no need to use std::string here -- a char array is faster:

char row[81] ; row[80] = 0 ;
for (int y = 0; y < 20; y++)
  {
  for (int x = 0 ; x < 80 ; x++)
    row[x] = char(box[x][y]) ;
  std::cout << row ;
  // Don't you want a newline here?
  }
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was thinking. No need to dynamically allocate an array that's the same size every time. –  GManNickG Jan 25 '11 at 9:10

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