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I am trying to expand my template programming skills and I am facing a problem to which I don't see the right solution for. This is a personal training execise only to do some more advanced templating.

This the goal : write a template to convert any integer type (using sprintf or swprintf) to either string or wstring depending on the type of the format sring. There is no need for error-checking (for now anuway).

The problem is when an format is specified as (const char*) NULL or (const wchar_t*) NULL

I need to supply a default LITERAL value as either "%i" or L"%i" an for that I need to determine the char-type of the format-variable. I am using a functions for that now ,using SFINAE. However I would like to use a variable for that ,but I don't think SFINAY works on varaiables (or am i wrong).

Here is my (working) code so far:

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template < typename T ,typename I > 
inline 
typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< T ,char >::value ,int >::type 
str_printf ( T* szBuff ,int iLen ,const T* szFrmt ,I iNum )
{ return sprintf_s( szBuff ,iLen ,szFrmt ,iNum ); }

template < typename T ,typename I > 
inline 
typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< T ,wchar_t >::value ,int >::type 
str_printf ( T* szBuff ,int iLen ,const T* szFrmt ,I iNum )
{ return swprintf_s( szBuff ,iLen ,szFrmt ,iNum ); }

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template < typename T > 
inline 
typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< T ,char >::value ,const char* >::type 
Dflt_Frmt ()    { return "%i"; }

template < typename T > 
inline 
typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< T ,wchar_t >::value ,const wchar_t* >::type 
Dflt_Frmt ()    { return L"%i"; }

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template < typename T ,typename I > 
inline 
std::basic_string< T ,std::char_traits < T > > 
to_string ( I iNum ,const T* pszFrmt )
{
    const int iLen (65);
    T szBuff [iLen] = {0};

    std::basic_string< T ,std::char_traits < T > > frmt ((pszFrmt && (*pszFrmt)) ? pszFrmt : Dflt_Frmt<T>() );
    str_printf( szBuff ,iLen ,frmt.c_str() ,iNum );

    return szBuff;
}

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

this this what i would like to do (obviously it's not workin)

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template < typename T ,typename I > 
inline 
std::basic_string< T ,std::char_traits < T > > 
to_string ( I iNum ,const T* pszFrmt )
{
    const int iLen (65);
    T szBuff [iLen] = {0};

    // declare a Variable of const T* and initialie it with "%i" or L"%i"
    typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< T ,char >::value      ,const char* >::type        dft("%i");
    typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< T ,wchar_t >::value   ,const wchar_t* >::type     dft (L"%i");
    // doesn't work (error : type is not a member of std::enable_if< ... > !

    std::basic_string< T ,std::char_traits < T > > frmt ((pszFrmt && (*pszFrmt)) ? pszFrmt : dft );

    str_printf( szBuff ,iLen ,frmt.c_str() ,iNum );

    return szBuff;
}

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Can I do this in a simillar way or is the working version the best way ? Or how to do this >

I don't need suggestion to use stringstreams (that's not what this question is about).

Using MSVS 2010 (and sorry ,no boost).

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
start with a better specification, some example code and desired output (in the style of a unit test would be good). That'll make it much easier to understand the point of all these templates and boost calls you're spewing all over the place. –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '11 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Frankly, this is the only solution I can think of:

template <typename T> struct Dft { static const T* value; };
template <> const char* Dft<char>::value = "%i";
template <> const wchar_t* Dft<wchar_t>::value = L"%i";

template < typename T ,typename I > 
inline 
std::basic_string< T ,std::char_traits < T > > 
to_string ( I iNum ,const T* pszFrmt )
{
    const int iLen (65);
    T szBuff [iLen] = {0};

    std::basic_string< T ,std::char_traits < T > > frmt ((pszFrmt && (*pszFrmt)) ? pszFrmt : Dft<T>::value );

    str_printf( szBuff ,iLen ,frmt.c_str() ,iNum );

    return szBuff;
};

It's not pretty, but it works.

share|improve this answer
    
I thinks its prettyer than mine and more descriptive. Thanks. –  Edwin Jan 25 '11 at 4:08

Your uses of enable_if in your second code block turn into hard errors because you are not using it in the signature of a template. You might need something like boost::mpl::if_ to compute the type of the variable dft; I believe you can just cast from a narrow string to a wide one to get your format to work in both cases.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jeremiah Willcock: Thanks for your repons. I appreciate the cast suggestion. Can you elaborate on the signature argument. I don't fully understand what you mean by that. –  Edwin Jan 25 '11 at 3:36
    
You can use enable_if to control whether or not a particular overload or specialization is chosen based on its template arguments, but by the time you are instantiating the body of a function or class, the compiler already knows which overload it's going to use. Thus, if enable_if fails there, the compiler outputs an error; it's basically "too late" to back out of that choice of template to use. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 25 '11 at 3:38
    
@Jeremiah Willcock: Yes ,I was affraid of that. –  Edwin Jan 25 '11 at 3:41
    
@Edwin: It is difficult to do type-based dispatching in the middle of a function. Boost.MPL helps with many cases, though, so you might want to look at that. Otherwise, you might need to write a separate helper class (that is also a template and dispatches using enable_if or specializations) to do your type handling. Libraries such STL and the Boost Graph Library use many helper classes and functions for that kind of dispatching. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 25 '11 at 3:45
    
@Jeremiah Willcock: I am gonna use Boost at one time ,but right now it's too inconvenient to add a new tool to learn ,I've got much at hand at the moment. –  Edwin Jan 25 '11 at 3:53

IMO, what you're trying to do here is a pretty hopeless endeavor. A "%i" conversion will only work with integers, not (for example) floating point types, so your code only works if I is int1. For any other type, the user must pass a (correct) format string for the code to have defined behavior. For the moment, I'll ignore this issue, and just assume the user passes a (correct) format string if I isn't int.

While you might want to expand to a few other things sometime in the future, for now you really only have two possibilities for the type of the format string: char * or wchar_t *. That being the case, it seems like the right way to handle things is a simple overload (or specialization, if you insist):

template <class T>
std::string to_string(T val, char *fmt = "%i") { 
    // for the moment using `sprintf`, simply because every knows it -- not really
    // advising its use in production code.
    char buffer[256];
    sprintf(buffer, fmt, val);
    return std::string(buffer);
}

template <class T>
std::wstring to_string(T val, wchar_t *fmt = L"%i") { 
    wchar_t buffer[256];
    wsprintf(buffer, fmt, val);
    return std::wstring(buffer);
}

Right now, you're doing essentially a "switch on type", something that's almost always avoidable (and generally best avoided) in C++. The minor detail that you're doing it (or trying to anyway) at compile-time instead of run-time doesn't really change that.

1Well, you might be able to argue that it should work if I is unsigned int and the value is within the range that can be represented as an int, but that's about the best you can hope for (and even that's highly questionable).

share|improve this answer
    
These overloads are ambiguous if called with a single parameter, by the way. But, of course, as you said, a straight good old-fashion specialisation of the to_string function template for either types will work. –  Mikael Persson Jan 25 '11 at 4:11
    
@Mikael: Oops, you're right. I got a bit too lazy... –  Jerry Coffin Jan 25 '11 at 4:16
    
Thank you for your answer. But issue here is not the way to_string(...) should be implemented. It's an exercise in template-programming. –  Edwin Jan 25 '11 at 4:23
    
@Edwin: Yes, I kind of figured that, but I think it would be better to choose a more realistic example to work on. There's no great shortage of reasons for templates... –  Jerry Coffin Jan 25 '11 at 4:38

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