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What's the fastest and easiest to read implementation of calculating the sum of digits?

I.e. Given the number: 17463 = 1 + 7 + 4 + 6 + 3 = 21

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10 Answers

up vote 49 down vote accepted

You could do it arithmetically, without using a string:

sum = 0;
while (n != 0) {
    sum += n % 10;
    n /= 10;
}
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Beat me to it. This is the best way. –  Simucal Jan 26 '09 at 6:23
    
Personally, I see this better conceptually as a for loop... But maybe that's just my mind, I tend to see everything better as a for loop... –  Matthew Scharley Jan 26 '09 at 8:04
    
@monoxide, the while loop is more succinct. You have no need for an index or for tight control of the loop iterations. –  Simucal Jan 26 '09 at 10:26
    
for (; n!= 0; n /= 10) { sum += n % 10;} To my mind there's an implicit counter there, n. But my mind is known to work funilly when talking about loops. There's no need to initialise n of course, because that's handled before the loop presumably. –  Matthew Scharley Jan 26 '09 at 10:28
    
+1: I love this code, it's very elegant. Not new to me, but very cool. –  Dommer Sep 7 '11 at 7:22
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I use

int result = 17463.ToString().Sum(c => c - '0');

It uses only 1 line of code.

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Converting an integer to a string in order to sum it's values is not really very efficient. I also don't consider this code especially readable. Though I didn't downvote this. –  Brian Jan 26 '09 at 6:54
    
You forgot to convert the string to array first. 17463.ToString().ToCharArray().Sum(c => c - '0'); –  Hasan Khan Jan 26 '09 at 7:58
5  
You don't have to convert it to an array first. –  atsjoo Jan 26 '09 at 7:59
    
+1 from me, I like oneliners.. :) –  Stefan Feb 6 '09 at 13:08
    
Very nice and functional approach! –  Martijn Mar 5 '09 at 10:40
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For integer numbers, Greg Hewgill has most of the answer, but forgets to account for the n < 0. The sum of the digits of -1234 should still be 10, not -10.

n = Math.Abs(n);
sum = 0;
while (n != 0) {
    sum += n % 10;
    n /= 10;
}

It the number is a floating point number, a different approach should be taken, and chaowman's solution will completely fail when it hits the decimal point.

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Good catch. It all depends on how the modulo operator is defined in the language in question; in C# the result takes the same sign as the dividend which makes my method fail for negative numbers. In other languages it may work, see the table at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation –  Greg Hewgill Jan 26 '09 at 8:04
1  
+1 for bringing up corner cases. –  Mark LeMoine Nov 16 '10 at 1:06
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 public static int SumDigits(int value)
 {
     int sum = 0;
     while (value != 0)
     {
         int rem;
         value = Math.DivRem(value, 10, out rem);
         sum += rem;
     }
     return sum;
 }
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Assuming DivRem does the intelligent thing, this should avoid doing the division twice. I like it better than the other obvious answer (though both are close). –  Lawrence Dol Jan 26 '09 at 6:50
    
This is the code of DivRem public static int DivRem(int a, int b, out int result) { result = a % b; return (a / b); } so it does not make intelligent thing!! –  Ahmed Said Jan 26 '09 at 7:50
    
Any reasonable compiler will see that x and y don't change between the x/y and x%y operations and thus can utilize a single divsion op to get both results. I know that gcc does this for c/c++ code. I assume c# compilers are at least as competent with such a simple optimization. –  Evan Teran Jan 26 '09 at 8:03
    
This almost certainly isn't something the C# compiler would do - it would be up to the JIT. –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '09 at 8:22
    
fair enough, I was kinda lumping the JIT and the compiler proper into one category, but yea, the JIT would do the actual optimization. –  Evan Teran Jan 26 '09 at 15:25
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int num = 12346;
int sum = 0;
for (int n = num; n > 0; sum += n % 10, n /= 10) ;
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Although there are many correct answers but this should be the best and correct answer –  Fahad Hussain Oct 6 '11 at 9:15
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int sumDigits (long n) {
    int sum = 0, int sum1 = 0;

    while (n > 0) {
        sum = n % 10;
        n /= 10;
        sum1 += sum;
    }

    return sum1;
}
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How is this different from @Greg Hewgill's two year old answer? –  jensgram Mar 16 '11 at 13:24
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I would suggest that the easiest to read implementation would be something like:

public int sum(int number)
{
    int ret = 0;
    foreach (char c in Math.Abs(number).ToString())
        ret += c - '0';
    return ret;
}

This works, and is quite easy to read. BTW: Convert.ToInt32('3') gives 51, not 3. Convert.ToInt32('3' - '0') gives 3.

I would assume that the fastest implementation is Greg Hewgill's arithmetric solution.

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I like the chaowman's response, but would do one change

int result = 17463.ToString().Sum(c => Convert.ToInt32(c));

I'm not even sure the c - '0', syntax would work? (substracting two characters should give a character as a result I think?)

I think it's the most readable version (using of the word sum in combination with the lambda expression showing that you'll do it for every char). But indeed, I don't think it will be the fastest.

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I thought I'd just post this for completion's sake:

If you need a recursive sum of digits, e.g: 17463 -> 1 + 7 + 4 + 6 + 3 = 21 -> 2 + 1 = 3
then the best solution would be

int result = input % 9;
return result == 0 ? 9 : result;
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not good ways but...

    static int SumOfDigits1(int number)
    {
        int result = 0;
        foreach (var c in number.ToString().ToCharArray())
        {
            result += Convert.ToInt32(c.ToString());
        }
        return result;
    }

OR

    static int SumOfDigits2(int number)
    {
        int length = number.ToString().Length;
        string strNumber = number.ToString();

        int result = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            result += Convert.ToInt32(strNumber[i].ToString());
        }
        return result;
    }
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