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For general protocol message exchange, with loss tolerant. How much more efficient is UDP over TCP?

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Why c++ tag? This is a cross-language concept. Someone remove this tag –  Marcio Aguiar Sep 6 '08 at 23:15
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This question could do with some cleanup. The questioner obviously wants to say something by "with loss tolerant" but what exactly? –  tialaramex Sep 17 '08 at 10:18
    
I agree with tialaramex - the question needs some cleanup, even if it has a good idea. –  Cristian Ciupitu Sep 17 '08 at 17:01
    
You could also add the "tcp" tag since the question is about TCP, too. –  Cristian Ciupitu Sep 17 '08 at 17:03
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12 Answers

up vote 35 down vote accepted

UDP is faster than TCP, and the simple reason is because its nonexistent acknowledge packet (ACK) that permits a continuous packet stream, instead of TCP that acknowledges a set of packets, calculated by using the TCP window size and round-trip time (RTT).

For more information I recommend the simple, but very comprehensible Skullbox explanation (TCP vs. UDP)

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There are actually many cases where TCP is actually faster than UDP. See my answer below. –  Robert S. Barnes Feb 15 '11 at 6:53
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The link is broken. It has been changed to skullbox.net/tcpudp.php (www part was added). Please fix it. –  Eye Feb 22 '13 at 6:10
    
Which is faster depends entirely on the traffic characteristics. –  hplbsh Feb 28 '13 at 18:02
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People say that the major thing TCP gives you is reliability. But that's not really true. The most important thing TCP gives you is congestion control: you can run 100 TCP connections across a DSL link all going at max speed, and all 100 connections will be productive, because they all "sense" the available bandwidth. Try that with 100 different UDP applications, all pushing packets as fast as they can go, and see how well things work out for you.

On a larger scale, this TCP behavior is what keeps the Internet from locking up into "congestion collapse".

Things that tend to push applications towards UDP:

  • Group delivery semantics: it's possible to do reliable delivery to a group of people much more efficiently than TCP's point-to-point acknowledgement.

  • Out-of-order delivery: in lots of applications, as long as you get all the data, you don't care what order it arrives in; you can reduce app-level latency by accepting an out-of-order block.

  • Unfriendliness: on a LAN party, you may not care if your web browser functions nicely as long as you're blitting updates to the network as fast as you possibly can.

But even if you care about performance, you probably don't want to go with UDP:

  • You're on the hook for reliability now, and a lot of the things you might do to implement reliability can end up being slower than what TCP already does.

  • Now you're network-unfriendly, which can cause problems in shared environments.

  • Most importantly, firewalls will block you.

You can potentially overcome some TCP performance and latency issues by "trunking" multiple TCP connections together; iSCSI does this to get around congestion control on local area networks, but you can also do it to create a low-latency "urgent" message channel (TCP's "URGENT" behavior is totally broken).

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Good answer, I'd even go more general, "flow control" (as opposed to congestion control, which is a subset of flow control). Not only multiple TCP connections can share one link, but it would also prevent sender from overflowing receiver's buffer if they pause processing incoming data for any reason. –  Alex B Jan 5 '10 at 10:07
    
Yes, but an application could implement it's own congestion control using UDP and be faster than TCP ever could if it did not rely on ACK's - which wouldn't be needed with loss tolerance as the OP specefies. –  markmnl Sep 22 '13 at 4:37
    
At what level is network congestion managed with TCP? It would seem like an application utilizing UDP would not have any trivial way to implement congestion control, as it can't peak at network utilization outside of its own utilization(i.e. what other connections are using), thus it would be unable to effectively manage congestion. Am I off base here? –  AaronLS Feb 5 at 21:46
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@AaronLS: packet loss and RTT (roundtrip time) increases (which can be seen as a proxy for queuing delay) are/can be (e.g: WiFi networks may lose packets without real congestion, fooling some TCP congestion control algorithms into congestion avoidance) congestion indicators. –  ninjalj Mar 31 at 11:34
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In some applications TCP is faster (better throughput) than UDP.

This is the case when doing lots of small writes relative to the MTU size. For example, I read an experiment in which a stream of 300 byte packets was being sent over Ethernet (1500 byte MTU) and TCP was 50% faster than UDP.

The reason is because TCP will try and buffer the data and fill a full network segment thus making more efficient use of the available bandwidth.

UDP on the other hand puts the packet on the wire immediately thus congesting the network with lots of small packets.

You probably shouldn't use UDP unless you have a very specific reason for doing so. Especially since you can give TCP the same sort of latency as UDP by disabling the Nagle algorithm (for example if you're transmitting real-time sensor data and you're not worried about congesting the network with lot's of small packets).

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I've actually done benchmarks to this effect. I was sending packets that were as large as UDP would support without throwing exceptions (in Java) and TCP was much faster. I would guess a lot of OS, driver, and hardware optimizations are part of this as well. –  Charlie Aug 1 '09 at 21:47
    
I was actually reading this post because of a project idea involving real-time sensor data. Can you elaborate on that algorithm? –  LoveMeSomeCode Dec 31 '09 at 19:21
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What you have said is purely implementation defined. The implementation can choose to group the packets because TCP is a stream protocol. In UDP there is no stream and no opportunity to do so. But why bring up this situation? What sort of moronic program would stream UDP packets at sizes less than the MTU. You have gone out of your way to find the only situation where UDP is faster (streaming with a small packet size)? –  Myforwik Jun 30 '11 at 10:50
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@Myforwik: First, this is not implementation defined, it is part of the TCP protocol. It's called the Nagle algorithm. It helps prevent what's commonly known as Silly Window Syndrome. Look up both terms. Second, there is no concept of packets from TCP's pov. Lastly, the book "Effective TCP/IP Programming" dedicates a whole chapter to this subject and multiple other chapters to the related subject of knowing when to use TCP vs. UDP. I bring up this situation ( which is actually quite common ) because the OP asked a general question, and this is one of the many possible answers. –  Robert S. Barnes Jun 30 '11 at 11:59
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@Myforwik. When suggesting moronism in others, try to realise that we all have gaps in our knowledge -- you included. SO is, after all, a forum for knowledge-sharing. Pretty much all first person shooters use UDP, and it's rare for them to send packets at sizes anywhere near as large as the MTU. If you'd like to go and suggest to John Carmack what a moron he was for coming up with this approach, I'd encourage you to educate yourself thoroughly in this regard, first. 15 years, and an industry's worth of high-performance networking code doesn't lie down and die because you think its "moronic". –  Nick Wiggill Dec 12 '11 at 14:24
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with loss tolerant

Do you mean "with loss tolerance" ?

Basically, UDP is not "loss tolerant". You can send 100 packets to someone, and they might only get 95 of those packets, and some might be in the wrong order.

For things like video streaming, and multiplayer gaming, where it is better to miss a packet than to delay all the other packets behind it, this is the obvious choice

For most other things though, a missing or 'rearranged' packet is critical. You'd have to write some extra code to run on top of UDP to retry if things got missed, and enforce correct order. This would add a small bit of overhead in certain places.

Thankfully, some very very smart people have done this, and they called it TCP.

Think of it this way: If a packet goes missing, would you rather just get the next packet as quickly as possible and continue (use UDP), or do you actually need that missing data (use TCP). The overhead won't matter unless you're in a really edge-case scenario.

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5 packets out of 100? It's quite a lot. I guess it's just an example. Question: in real situation how many packets can be lost? Because if it is for example 2 out of 10000 (plus minus 1), then I wouldn't worry about that. –  freakish Mar 28 '13 at 12:40
    
@freakish, yeah it was just an example. The actual amount of packet loss depends on your connection, upstream networks, etc. I used to play a lot of online games, and I would find that if it was just me using the internet connection, I'd get no packet loss, but as soon as I'd launch a background download, I'd start to get some (maybe 10%-20%). This was about 5 years ago though, and faster internet connections may help. –  Orion Edwards Mar 29 '13 at 18:52
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Each TCP connection requires an initial handshake before data is transmitted. Also, the TCP header contains a lot of overhead intended for different signals and message delivery detection. For a message exchange, UDP will probably suffice if a small chance of failure is acceptable. If receipt must be verified, TCP is your best option.

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Small chance of failure and a limit on packet size. –  Arkadiy Sep 11 '08 at 20:09
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@Andrew, I beg to differ. UDP is the choice in some kinds of application because of performance requirements. One classic example is video conferencing. This kind of application doesn't respond well to TCP control.

Other aspect to take in consideration is if you're going to need multicast. If so, use UDP.

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UDP is also used because if you miss a packet or two, it's probably too late anyway, and you're probably best to just skip it, and move on so you can continue watching. A little blip in the video because of some dropped packets is much better than having tons of congestion. –  Kibbee Mar 12 '09 at 12:48
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Which protocol performs better (in terms of throughput) - UDP or TCP - really depends on the network characteristics and the network traffic. Robert S. Barnes, for example, points out a scenario where TCP performs better (small-sized writes). Now, consider a scenario in which the network is congested and has both TCP and UDP traffic. Senders in the network that are using TCP, will sense the 'congestion' and cut down on their sending rates. However, UDP doesn't have any congestion avoidance or congestion control mechanisms, and senders using UDP would continue to pump in data at the same rate. Gradually, TCP senders would reduce their sending rates to bare minimum and if UDP senders have enough data to be sent over the network, they would hog up the majority of bandwidth available. So, in such a case, UDP senders will have greater throughput, as they get the bigger pie of the network bandwidth. In fact, this is an active research topic - How to improve TCP throughput in presence of UDP traffic. One way, that I know of, using which TCP applications can improve throughput is by opening multiple TCP connections. That way, even though, each TCP connection's throughput might be limited, the sum total of the throughput of all TCP connections may be greater than the throughput for an application using UDP.

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good explanation +1 –  KillBill Oct 21 '12 at 18:31
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UDP is slightly quicker in my experience, but not by much. The choice shouldn't be made on performance but on the message content and compression techniques.

If it's a protocol with message exchange, I'd suggest that the very slight performance hit you take with TCP is more than worth it. You're given a connection between two end points that will give you everything you need. Don't try and manufacture your own reliable two-way protocol on top of UDP unless you're really, really confident in what you're undertaking.

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If you need to quickly blast a message across the net between two IP's that haven't even talked yet, then a UDP is going to arrive at least 3 times faster, usually 5 times faster.

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Keep in mind that TCP usually keeps multiple messages on wire. If you want to implement this in UDP you'll have quite a lot of work if you want to do it reliably. Your solution is either going to be less reliable, less fast or an incredible amount of work. There are valid applications of UDP, but if you're asking this question yours probably is not.

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There has been some work done to allow the programmer to have the benefits of both worlds.

SCTP

It is an independent transport layer protolol, but it can be used as a library providing additional layer over UDP. The basic unit of communication is a message (mapped to one or more UDP packets). There is congestion control built in. The protocol has knobs and twiddles to switch on

  • in order delivery of messages
  • automatic retransmission of lost messages, with user defined parameters

if any of this is needed for your particular application.

One issue with this is that the connection establishment is a complicated (and therefore slow process)

Other similar stuff

One more similar proprietary experimental thing

This also tries to improve on the triple way handshake of TCP and change the congestion control to better deal with fast lines.

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It is meaningless to talk about tcp or udp without taking the network condition into account. If the network between the two point have a very high qualify, UDP is absolutely faster than tcp, but in some other case such as the GPRS network, tcp may been faster and more reliability than udp.

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