Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm making a calculator in Java using Processing as a framework. I'm writing a class that stores number input so that it can be retrieved later on.

//store numbers in memory
class memStorage {
  float storedNum1, storedNum2;

  //constructor
  void Memory(float num1, float num2){
    storedNum1 = num1;
    storedNum2 = num2;
  }

  //Store numbers and call them when needed
  //Store the first number
  void mem1(float num1){
    num1 = number;
    println("number 1 has been stored");
  }

  //Store the second number
  void mem2(float num2){
    num2 = number;
    println("number 2 has been stored");
  }

}

void processNumber(char number){
  //Instantiate memory storage class and execute method
  memStorage storedNum1 = new memStorage();
  storedNum1.mem1();
  //print keypressed numbers
  println(storedNum1);
}

When I run the sketch in processing it gives me an error that says: Cannot find anything named "number"

I'm sort of stuck as to what I'm supposed to do to get this to work. Any advice is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
already answered, but the code has massive flaws. The method commented as constructor is wrong. No method is publicly visible, I hope you want default accessibility on them. In method, mem1 and mem2, you are assigning a value to argument instead of using value of the argument to assign to a class/local variable. And finally, as everyone said, if you want number to be accessible and modifiable by multiple methods, just make it a class variable. – Nishant Jan 25 '11 at 5:55
    
Trying to read through all of the comments and criticism, this is only my second project using Java; keep in mind i'm also using processing as a framework. Doing my best to learn from everyone's advice. Thanks for the help. – nnash Jan 25 '11 at 6:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's tons of syntax issues here. You don't have just 1 issue, you have a lot. Just fixing the one you asked about is going to lead to about 5 - 10 more.

I'll comment them inline first.

//This should probably be MemStorage. In Java classes start with a capital letter.
//It should also probably be public.
class memStorage {  
  float storedNum1, storedNum2;

  //constructor
  //This isn't a constructor. This is a method. It would be a constructor if it matched the name 
  //of the class AND didn't return a type of "void"
  void Memory(float num1, float num2){
    storedNum1 = num1;
    storedNum2 = num2;
  }

  //Store numbers and call them when needed
  //Store the first number
  void mem1(float num1){
    num1 = number; // The value of number is undeclared. This is the syntax error you ran into.
    // Also note that you didn't store in storedNum1.
    println("number 1 has been stored");
  }

  //Store the second number
  void mem2(float num2){
    num2 = number; // The value of number is undeclared. This is the syntax error you ran into.
    // Also note that you didn't store in storedNum2.
    println("number 2 has been stored");
  }

}

// This method isn't within the body of any class. Methods always belong inside of a class.
// The way you write this method, it looks like it should be the main method of another class
// You are using to hand test the MemStorage class
void processNumber(char number){
  //Instantiate memory storage class and execute method
  memStorage storedNum1 = new memStorage();
  storedNum1.mem1();
  //print keypressed numbers
  println(storedNum1); //This method doesn't exist. You probably mean System.out.println()
  // Furthermore, you didn't override toString(), so it wouldn't print anything meaningful.
}

Here's how I would clean this up and retain what appears to be your intention.

public class MemStorage {
    private float storedNum1;
    private float storedNum2;

    public MemStorage(float num1, float num2){
        this.storedNum1 = num1;
        this.storedNum2 = num2;
    }

    public void setNum1(float num1){
        this.storedNum1 = num1;
        System.out.println("Number 1 has been stored.");
    }

    public void setNum2(float num2){
        this.storedNum2 = num2;
        System.out.println("Number 2 has been stored.");
    }

    public float getNum1(){
        return this.storedNum1;
    }

    public float getNum2(){
        return this.storedNum2;
    }

    // Hand Test
    public static void main(String[] args){
        MemStorage memStorage = new MemStorage(0,0);
        memStorage.setNum1(1.23454f);
        System.out.println(memStorage.getNum1());
    }
}

You really need to go back to basics and start with a beginners tutorial.

share|improve this answer
    
OP needs to know basics more than the solution. Hope this gives clarity, but if he's gonna copy-paste this. Wouldn't be good. – Nishant Jan 25 '11 at 5:59
    
I agree. However, if we just tell him the 1 error, he's gonna be back with the next one in 10 minutes. I figure I'll give him something that works in it's entirety, and let him play with that. Hopefully he will take the time to understand everything I did. – rfeak Jan 25 '11 at 6:02
    
I understand what Nishant is getting at and I appreciate the length of work rfreak went through to create the code sample he has offered as a solution. I'm going to sit down with my prof tomorrow and make sure that I understand all of whats going on in the code. – nnash Jan 25 '11 at 6:14

First, put the processNumber function inside of memStorage class. You'll probably want to convert the 'number' variable as an instance variable along with storedNum1 and storedNum2. And third, create a main() function inside of the class and then make an instance of memStorage class and call the processNumber() function. And fourth, the constructor MUST be the exact same name as the class name. Change it to 'memStorage'.

Also mem1 and mem2 functions doesnt store anything to the instance variable. Once the function exits, the 'num1' and 'num2' variable will vanish. Replace 'num1' and 'num2' to storedNum1 or storedNum2.

You'll need to study and understand the object oriented paradigm concept.

share|improve this answer

if you look closer at

 num1 = number;

and

 num2 = number;

You'll see that there is no declaration of number before (unless you haven't posted the related code?)

also I think you wanted to do something like

private number = 0;       
void mem1(float num1){
   number = num1;
   println("number 1 has been stored in private field number");
}

your code copies the value of number into a local variable num1 that will be destroyed on exiting the function: Nothing will be stored.

share|improve this answer

It seems that number is a local variable and that it can't be seen outside its method block.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.