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<complexType name="BookShelf">
   <sequence>
      <choice minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded">
         <element name="newBook" type="string"/>
         <element name="oldBook" type="string"/>
      </choice>
   </sequence>
</complexType>

JAXB generates the property as a List<JAXBElement<String>>. Is there any way it can be generated as ArrayList?

share|improve this question
2  
Why? JAXB generated a kind of API from the schema. An API should not contain concrete classes. ArrayList has only one public method more than List: trimToSize(), is this essential for you? By the way: the generated code creates an ArrrayList instances in lazy getters. –  Arne Burmeister Jan 25 '11 at 7:53

3 Answers 3

Why, what good would that do you?

  1. ArrayList<E> has no public methods that are not in the List<E> interface, so there is nothing you could do with the ArrayList<E> that you couldn't do with any other List<E> (actually there is one: ArrayList.trimToSize(), thanks @Joachim Sauer, but it's hardly ever needed).
  2. It's awful practice for an API to accept or return implementation types instead of the underlying interfaces. I'd suggest you to follow the Collections Trail of the Sun Java Tutorial and / or read Effective Java by Joshua Bloch (you'll get an idea of what he's talking about from this short preview, which is the source of the quote below) to learn more about the Collections framework and interface usage.
  3. Who says the underlying List implementation isn't ArrayList? ArrayList is the most commonly-used List implementation anyway, so chances are high that JAXB will actually return an ArrayList, it just won't tell you so (because you don't need to know).

Item 52: Refer to Objects by their Interfaces (excerpt)

Item 40 contains the advice that you should use interfaces rather than classes as parameter types. More generally, you should favor the use of interfaces rather than classes to refer to objects. If appropriate interface types exist, then parameters, return values, variables, and fields should all be declared using interface types. The only time you really need to refer to an object’s class is when you’re creating it with a constructor. To make this concrete, consider the case of Vector, which is an implementation of the List interface. Get in the habit of typing this:

// Good - uses interface as type
List<Subscriber> subscribers = new Vector<Subscriber>();

rather than this:

// Bad - uses class as type!
Vector<Subscriber> subscribers = new Vector<Subscriber>();

[ ... ]

Source: Effective Java, preview on SafariBooksOnline.

share|improve this answer
4  
Item #1 is not entirely correct (see trimToSize(), mentioned by Arne above). –  Joachim Sauer Jan 25 '11 at 8:18
    
@Joachim darn, yes, I missed that one :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 25 '11 at 8:57
3  
It's rude to answer a question with another one. –  jonbros May 10 '11 at 17:11
    
@jonbros perhaps, but it would have been unforgivable to answer the question literally without making the OP aware of the flaws in his Question –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 10 '11 at 19:25
    
@jonbros No, I didn't forget to answer the question, I chose not to answer it literally. Others did answer it literally but I chose to challenge the question instead. And apparently I'm not alone with my views. Go ahead, answer some questions, get some rep and downvote my answer, but it will still be the only appropriate way to answer this question. –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 11 '11 at 9:56

By default the property will be a List and the underlying implementation will be an ArrayList. Of course you can use JAXB customizations to change the underlying implementation, or use your own class with a property of type ArrayList (although for the reasons mentioned in other answers this is rarely a good idea).

Default JAXB Generation

Given your XML Schema:

<schema xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
   <complexType name="BookShelf">
      <sequence>
         <choice minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded">
            <element name="newBook" type="string"/>
            <element name="oldBook" type="string"/>
         </choice>
      </sequence>
   </complexType>
</schema>

Using the following command line:

xjc -d out your-schema.xsd

JAXB will generate the following class:

package generated;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessorType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementRef;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementRefs;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlType;


@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
@XmlType(name = "BookShelf", propOrder = {
    "newBookOrOldBook"
})
public class BookShelf {

    @XmlElementRefs({
        @XmlElementRef(name = "newBook", type = JAXBElement.class),
        @XmlElementRef(name = "oldBook", type = JAXBElement.class)
    })
    protected List<JAXBElement<String>> newBookOrOldBook;

    public List<JAXBElement<String>> getNewBookOrOldBook() {
        if (newBookOrOldBook == null) {
            newBookOrOldBook = new ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>>();
        }
        return this.newBookOrOldBook;
    }

}

Customizing the Generation

By default JAXB will have the property type be List with the underlying implementation being ArrayList. If you wish to control the underlying implementation you can use an external binding file like:

<jxb:bindings 
    xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
    xmlns:jxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb"
    version="2.1">

    <jxb:bindings schemaLocation="f3.xsd">
            <jxb:bindings node="//xs:complexType[@name='BookShelf']/xs:sequence/xs:choice">
                <jxb:property collectionType="java.util.LinkedList"/>
            </jxb:bindings>
    </jxb:bindings>

</jxb:bindings>

And the following XJC call:

xjc -d out -b binding.xml your-schema.xsd

To get the following class instead:

package generated;

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessorType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementRef;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementRefs;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlType;


@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
@XmlType(name = "BookShelf", propOrder = {
    "newBookOrOldBook"
})
public class BookShelf {

    @XmlElementRefs({
        @XmlElementRef(name = "oldBook", type = JAXBElement.class),
        @XmlElementRef(name = "newBook", type = JAXBElement.class)
    })
    protected List<JAXBElement<String>> newBookOrOldBook = new LinkedList<JAXBElement<String>>();

    public List<JAXBElement<String>> getNewBookOrOldBook() {
        if (newBookOrOldBook == null) {
            newBookOrOldBook = new LinkedList<JAXBElement<String>>();
        }
        return this.newBookOrOldBook;
    }

}

Using your own class:

You can also use your own class with a property of type ArrayList (although for the reasons mentioned in other answers this is rarely a good idea).

package com.example;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessorType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementRef;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementRefs;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlType;

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
@XmlType(name = "BookShelf", propOrder = {
    "newBookOrOldBook"
})
public class BookShelf {

    @XmlElementRefs({
        @XmlElementRef(name = "oldBook", type = JAXBElement.class),
        @XmlElementRef(name = "newBook", type = JAXBElement.class)
    })
    protected ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>> newBookOrOldBook ;

    public ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>> getNewBookOrOldBook() {
        if (newBookOrOldBook == null) {
            newBookOrOldBook = new ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>>();
        }
        return this.newBookOrOldBook;
    }

}

For More Information:

share|improve this answer
    
Like your post. Thanks. But what if you would want to use Sets instead of Lists or any other collection type? –  jonbros May 10 '11 at 17:12
    
@jonbros - If you start with Java classes you can use a property of type set or other collection type. If you start from XML schema I do not believe you can cause it to generate a set. Although you may be able to make this happen with an XJC plug-in: weblogs.java.net/blog/kohsuke/archive/2005/06/… –  Blaise Doughan May 10 '11 at 17:26
    
Yes, starting from XML. I'll have a look at the plugin. I read about User-Defined-Datatypes here: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E12840_01/wls/docs103/webserv/… It says for java.utils.Set the "Equivalent XML Schema Data Type" is Literal Array. But I dont know what thats suppose to mean. Thank you! –  jonbros May 10 '11 at 17:31

You can't change the fact that the API generates a List.

However, assuming that the underlying implementation actually produces an ArrayList you can always just cast it to an ArrayList:

ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>> arrayList = 
        (ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>>) list;

Or if it isn't an arraylist (i.e. you get an exception trying the above...), you can generate a new ArrayList containing the same elements of the list.

ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>> arrayList = 
        new ArrayList<JAXBElement<String>>(list);

In general however, you shouldn't need to do any of this: it's always better to code against an interface abstraction rather than the underlying concrete class whenever you can.

share|improve this answer
1  
this is a classic +1 / -1 post. On the technical side, it's good to share this, but you should a) put more emphasis on this being an awful practice (perhaps replace shouldn't need with shouldn't) and b) a cast should hardly ever take place without an instanceof check. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 25 '11 at 8:13
1  
@Sean Patrick Floyd - for me it's a definite (+1) because (1) it gives a solution to the problem and (2) I don't know the actual requirements to do it. Maybe there is a good reason. Maybe not, but then he should study your answer ;) –  Andreas_D Jan 25 '11 at 8:42
    
Hi Sean: IMO casts without instanceof checks are perfectly good practice in many circumstances. it just means that you either know or are willing to make an assumption about the underlying concrete class. if that assumption turns out to be wrong you get a runtime exception, which is exactly the correct behaviour..... it's analogous to the way that you don't need to put a try / catch around every function call that might possibly cause an exception. –  mikera Jan 26 '11 at 14:19

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