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I've been wondering what the most efficient way to reverse the order of a BitArray in C#. To be clear, I don't want to inverse the Bitarray by calling .Not(), I want to reverse the order of the bits in the array.

Cheers, Chris

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Is the size fixed? –  user166390 Jan 25 '11 at 8:17
5  
How about just using (reading) it backward? –  Henk Holterman Jan 25 '11 at 8:21
    
Yes, the size is fixed (8 bits) –  Christopher Jan 25 '11 at 8:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted
public void Reverse(BitArray array)
{
    int length = array.Length;
    int mid = (length / 2);

    for (int i = 0; i < mid; i++)
    {
        bool bit = array[i];
        array[i] = array[length - i - 1];
        array[length - i - 1] = bit;
    }    
}
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This is like the 4th time I've upvoted someone to 10k. Enjoy those moderator tools! –  codekaizen Jan 25 '11 at 8:41
3  
@codekaizen cheers - I can see dead questions :) –  Tim Lloyd Jan 25 '11 at 8:44

For a long array and relative few uses, just wrap it:

    class BitArrayReverse
    {
        private BitArray _ba;

        public BitArrayReverse(BitArray ba) { _ba = ba; }

        public bool this[int index]
        {
            get { return _ba[_ba.Length - 1 - index]; }
            set { _ba[_ba.Length - 1 - index] = value; }
        }

    }
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+1 Nice. Not really an answer but clever option for some situations. –  Tomas Jan 25 '11 at 8:52

This will be the best way to reverse MSB <-> LSB of any length using XOR in the for loop

public static BitArray BitsReverse(BitArray bits)
{
    int len = bits.Count;
    BitArray a = new BitArray(bits);
    BitArray b = new BitArray(bits);

    for (int i = 0, j = len-1; i < len; ++i, --j)
    {
         a[i] = a[i] ^ b[j];
         b[j] = a[i] ^ b[j];
         a[i] = a[i] ^ b[j];
    }

    return a; 
} 
// in   010000011010000011100b
// out  001110000010110000010b
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 Dim myBA As New BitArray(4)
 myBA(0) = True
 myBA(1) = False
 myBA(2) = True
 myBA(3) = True
 Dim myBoolArray1(3) As Boolean
 myBA.CopyTo(myBoolArray1, 0)
 Array.Reverse(myBoolArray1)
 myBA = New BitArray(myBoolArray1)
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Because the size if fixed at 8-bits just the "table" lookup from below is sufficient -- when dealing with a plain byte a look-up is likely the quickest way. The extra overhead of BitSet to get/set the data may, however, nullify the look-up benefit. Also the initial build cost and persistent overhead need to be considered (but the values could be coded into an array literal ... ick!)

On the other hand, if the data is only 8 bit (ever), and "performance is important", why use a BitArray at all? A BitArray could always be used for the nice features, such as "exploding" to an Enumerable while C# already has decent byte bit manipulation built-in.

Assuming a more general case that the data is 8-bit aligned... but of some undetermined length

Is this actually better (faster, more efficient, etc) than just doing it "per item" in the BitArray? I have no idea but suspect not. I would definitely start with the "simple" methods -- this is here as just a proof-of-concept and may (or may not be) interesting to compare in a benchmark. Anyway, write for clarity first ... and the below is not it! (There is at least one bug in it -- I blame the extra complexity ;-)

byte reverse (byte b) { 
    byte o = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
        o <<= 1;
        o |= (byte)(b & 1);
        b >>= 1;
    }
    return o;
}

byte[] table;
BitArray reverse8 (BitArray ar) {
    if (ar.Count % 8 != 0) {
        throw new Exception("no!");
    }

    byte[] d = new byte[ar.Count / 8];
    ar.CopyTo(d, 0);

    // this only works if the bit array is
    // a multiple of 8. we swap bytes and
    // then reverse bits in each byte
    int mid = d.Length / 2; 
    for (int i = 0, j = d.Length - 1; i < mid; i++, j--) {
        byte t = d[i];
        d[i] = table[d[j]];
        d[j] = table[t];
    }

    return new BitArray(d);
}

string tostr (BitArray x) {
    return string.Join("",
        x.OfType<bool>().Select(i => i ? "1" : "0").ToArray());
}

void Main()
{
    table = Enumerable.Range(0,256).Select(v => reverse((byte)v)).ToArray();
    {
        byte[] s = new byte[] { 1, 0xff };  
        BitArray ar = new BitArray(s);  
        // linqpad :)
        tostr(ar).Dump();
        tostr(reverse8(ar)).Dump();
    }
    "--".Dump();
    {
        byte[] s = new byte[] { 3, 42, 19 };
        BitArray ar = new BitArray(s);  
        // linqpad :)
        tostr(ar).Dump();
        tostr(reverse8(ar)).Dump();
    }   
}

Output:

1000000011111111
1111111100000001
--
110000000101010011001000
000100110101010000000011

The expr.Dump() is a LINQPad feature.

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