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[3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 2]

Would be:

[ (3, 3), (4, 2), (2, 1) ]

The output should be sorted by highest count first to lowest count. In this case, 3 to 2 to 1.

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Do the groups all occur together or could you have [3,4,2,3,4,3] and expect the same output? Does the order of the output list matter in any way? –  Duncan Jan 25 '11 at 9:12
    
In your example, the output would still be the same. –  TIMEX Jan 25 '11 at 9:13
7  
At 855 Questions, I'm beginning to wonder if you ever try anything yourself first or are you trying to crowd-source a software project... –  Johnsyweb Jan 25 '11 at 9:27
1  
@John actually I like this kind of questions, I hope to see thousands more from TIMEX. –  systempuntoout Jan 25 '11 at 9:32
3  
Not only is this a duplicate. It's also homework. –  S.Lott Jan 25 '11 at 11:00
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
data = [3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 2]
result = []
for entry in set(data):
    result.append((entry, data.count(entry)))
result.sort(key = lambda x: -x[1])
print result

>>[(3, 3), (4, 2), (2, 1)]
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The output should be sorted by highest count first to lowest count. –  TIMEX Jan 25 '11 at 9:19
    
so print sorted(result, key=lambda x: -x[1]) instead of print result –  eumiro Jan 25 '11 at 9:22
    
and result = sorted(result, key = lambda x: -x[1]) can be written as result.sort(key = lambda x: -x[1]) –  eumiro Jan 25 '11 at 9:38
3  
See O(n**2) comments at stackoverflow.com/questions/1829470/… –  Fred Nurk Jan 25 '11 at 9:41
    
Is this O(n**2)? –  TIMEX Jan 25 '11 at 22:31
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You can use a Counter in Python 2.7+ (this recipe works on 2.5+):

from collections import Counter
print Counter([3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 2]).most_common()
# [(3, 3), (4, 2), (2, 1)]
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wow? ............ –  TIMEX Jan 25 '11 at 9:20
4  
TIMEX, haven't you heard that Python comes with 'batteries included'? –  Duncan Jan 25 '11 at 9:23
    
But Counter is a new collection class.:) This is correct answer if on 2.7 or 3.x –  Senthil Kumaran Jan 25 '11 at 9:27
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Try using a collections.Counter:

from collections import Counter
data = [3,4,2,3,4,3]
Counter(data).most_common()
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can't be imported? –  TIMEX Jan 25 '11 at 9:22
    
Which version of Python are you using? I think Counter was introduced in 2.6. –  Duncan Jan 25 '11 at 9:27
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Why would you choose an O(n**2) algorithm to do this. The alternative to Counter (if you have <2.7) is not too difficult

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> L=[3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 2]
>>> D=defaultdict(int)
>>> for i in L:
...     D[i]+=1
... 
>>> sorted(D.items(), key=itemgetter(1), reverse=True)
[(3, 3), (4, 2), (2, 1)]
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def myfun(x,y):
    return x[1]-y[1]

list1 = [3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 2]
s1 = set(list1)
newlist = []
for e in s1:
    newlist.append((e,list1.count(e)))
print sorted(newlist,cmp=myfun)

I think, this is what you asked for. Sorry for hurry with the first answer. But just note that cmp argument for sorted is not available in python3

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See O(n**2) comments at stackoverflow.com/questions/1829470/…. –  Fred Nurk Jan 25 '11 at 9:20
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