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If I define an extension method such as this:

static public String ToTitleCase(this string instance, CultureInfo culture)
{
    if (instance == null)
        throw new NullReferenceException();

    if (culture == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("culture");

    return culture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(instance);
}

Is it necessary for me to check the string instance for null and throw an null reference exception myself? Or does the CLR treat extension methods like instance methods in this case and handle the checking/throwing for me?

I know extension methods are just syntactic sugar for static methods, perhaps the C# compiler adds in the check at compile time? Please clarify :)

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marked as duplicate by Chris Lätta, Abbas, Alexei Levenkov, Yuushi, Toon Krijthe Apr 24 '13 at 4:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
The duplicate question provides some nice reasons in favor of ANE vs. NRE and other details. –  user166390 Jan 25 '11 at 10:44
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2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

No. You should never throw a NullReferenceException manually. It should only ever be thrown by the framework itself.

In this context, you should be throwing ArgumentNullException for both instance and culture:

static public String ToTitleCase(this string instance, CultureInfo culture)
{
    if (instance == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("instance");

    if (culture == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("culture");

   return culture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(instance);
}

From the NullReferenceException documentation:

Note that applications throw the ArgumentNullException exception rather than the NullReferenceException exception discussed here.

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4  
I don't think your "never" has enough emphasis. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 25 '11 at 10:23
    
Is there a particular reason for the "never"? What if the NRE isn't a result of an argument being null? (Different case, but why the "never"?) –  user166390 Jan 25 '11 at 10:26
    
@pst: I'm not sure I follow you. An NRE is reserved for when you try to dereference a null object ref. If you potentially want an NRE then just dereference without doing any prior checks and let the framework throw it for you (not that I'd recommend that approach). If you're throwing your own exceptions then you should treat NRE as off-limits. –  LukeH Jan 25 '11 at 10:31
1  
In this particular example a null reference exception would never be thrown by the framework since the string is not dereferenced. I'm just wondering if throwing a NullReferenceException myself would be more consistent for people consuming this method, ie. String foo = null; foo = foo.SubString(0, 10); // NullReferenceException foo = foo.ToTitleCase(c); // ArgumentNullException... confusing? –  MattDavey Jan 25 '11 at 10:37
1  
@Matt: An extension method is still just a static method, and the this parameter is still just a parameter to that method. Throwing NRE rather than ANE would, in my opinion, be more confusing and less consistent; no null is being dereferenced, but you have passed a null argument. –  LukeH Jan 25 '11 at 10:45
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It most certainly is not. However, "fail fast" and, what some people forget ... "fail helpfully". However, I believe the reasons for not throwing an ArgumentNullException (debate vs. NullReferenceException left to other posts) are limited and usually related to over-cleverness :-) One hypothetical use-case may be IsNullOrEmpty. As long as it actually serves a purpose and makes code cleaner: go for it.

There is no check from the CLR. As far as the runtime is concerned it just passed a (possibly null) argument to a static method. The rest is sugar -- and none of that sugar involves adding extra null checks :-)

Happy coding.

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