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Hallo,

is it true that C++0x will come without semaphores? There are already some questions on stackoverflow regarding the use of semaphores. I use them (posix semaphores) all the time to let a thread wait for some event in another thread:

void thread0(...)
{
  doSomething0();

  event1.wait();

  ...
}

void thread1(...)
{
  doSomething1();

  event1.post();

  ...
}

If I would do that with a mutex:

void thread0(...)
{
  doSomething0();

  event1.lock(); event1.unlock();

  ...
}

void thread1(...)
{
  event1.lock();

  doSomethingth1();

  event1.unlock();

  ...
}

Problem: It's ugly and it's not guaranteed that thread1 locks the mutex first (Given that the same thread should lock and unlock a mutex, you also can't lock event1 before thread0 and thread1 started).

So since boost doesn't have semaphores either, what is the simplest way to achieve the above?

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4 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted

You can easily build one from a mutex and a condition variable:

#include <boost/thread/condition.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/mutex.hpp>

class semaphore
{
private:
    boost::mutex mutex_;
    boost::condition_variable condition_;
    unsigned long count_;

public:
    semaphore()
        : count_()
    {}

    void notify()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
        ++count_;
        condition_.notify_one();
    }

    void wait()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
        while(!count_)
            condition_.wait(lock);
        --count_;
    }
};
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18  
someone should submit a proposal to the standards commitee –  Ion Todirel Jun 6 '12 at 23:36
1  
a comment here that puzzled me initially is the lock in wait, one might ask how can a thread can get past notify if the lock is held by wait? the somewhat poorly obscurely documented answer is that condition_variable.wait pulses the lock, allowing another thread to get past notify in an atomic fashion, at least that's how I understand it –  Ion Todirel Jun 14 '12 at 6:53
1  
pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009696799/functions/…: The pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal() functions may be called by a thread whether or not it currently owns the mutex that threads calling pthread_cond_wait() or pthread_cond_timedwait() have associated with the condition variable during their waits; however, if predictable scheduling behavior is required, then that mutex shall be locked by the thread calling pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal(). –  Maxim Yegorushkin Jun 14 '12 at 18:16
6  
It was deliberately excluded from Boost on the basis that a semaphore is too much rope for programmers to hang themselves with. Condition variables supposedly are more manageable. I see their point but feel a bit patronized. I assume that the same logic applies to C++11 -- programmers are expected to write their programs in a way that "naturally" uses condvars or other approved synchronization techniques. Supply a semaphore would run against that regardless of whether it's implemented on top of condvar or natively. –  Steve Jessop Aug 31 '12 at 15:31
1  
@DanNissenbaum: count_ is initialized to 0 because the semaphore is created as closed. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 16 '12 at 9:18
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Based on "Maxim Yegorushkin"'s answer, I tried to make the example in C++11 style.

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
using namespace std;

class semaphore{
private:
    mutex mtx;
    condition_variable cv;
    int count;

public:
    semaphore(int count_ = 0):count(count_){;}
    void notify()
    {
        unique_lock<mutex> lck(mtx);
        ++count;
        cv.notify_one();
    }
    void wait()
    {
        unique_lock<mutex> lck(mtx);

        while(count == 0){
            cv.wait(lck);
        }
        count--;
    }
};
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2  
You can make wait() also a three-liner: cv.wait(lck, [this]() { return count > 0; }); –  Domi Dec 6 '13 at 13:14
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in acordance with posix semaphores, I would add

class semaphore
{
    ...
    bool trywait()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
        if(count_)
        {
            --count_;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
};

And I much prefer using a synchronisation mechanism at a convenient level of abstraction, rather than always copy pasting a stitched-together version using more basic operators.

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You can work with mutex and condition variables. You gain exclusive access with the mutex, check whether you want to continue or need to wait for the other end. If you need to wait, you wait in a condition. When the other thread determines that you can continue, it signals the condition.

There is a short example in the boost::thread library that you can most probably just copy (the C++0x and boost thread libs are very similar).

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Condition signals only to waiting threads, or not? So if thread0 is not there waiting when thread1 signals it will be blocked later? Plus: I don't need the additional lock that comes with the condition - it's overhead. –  tauran Jan 25 '11 at 10:49
    
Yes, condition only signals waiting threads. The common pattern is having a variable with the state and a condition in case you need to wait. Think on a producer/consumer, there will be a count on the items in the buffer, the producer locks, adds the element, increments the count and signals. The consumer locks, checks the counter and if non-zero consumes, while if zero waits in the condition. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 25 '11 at 11:13
2  
You can simulate a semaphore this way: Initialize a variable with the value that you would give the semaphore, then wait() is translated to "lock, check count if non-zero decrement and continue; if zero wait on condition" while post would be "lock, increment counter, signal if it was 0" –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 25 '11 at 11:17
    
Yes, sounds good. I wonder if posix semaphores are implemented the same way. –  tauran Jan 25 '11 at 11:25
    
@tauran: I don't know for sure (and it might depend which Posix OS), but I think unlikely. Semaphores traditionally are a "lower-level" synchronization primitive than mutexes and condition variables, and in principle can be made more efficient than they would be if implemented on top of a condvar. So, more likely in a given OS is that all user-level synch primitives are built on top of some common tools that interact with the scheduler. –  Steve Jessop Aug 31 '12 at 15:28
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