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hi i have a sitemap xml document that looks something like this

<pagenode title="home" url="~/" fornavbar="true">
 <pagenode title="admin" url="~/admin" fornavbar="false">
  <pagenode title="users" url="~/admin/users" fornavbar="false"/>
  <pagenode title="events" url="~/admin/events" fornavbar="true"/>
 </pagenode>
 <pagenode title="catalog" url="~/catalog" fornavbar="true"/>
 <pagenode title="contact us" url="~/contactus" fornavbar="false"/>
</pagenode>

now i want to retrieve an xml document for the navbar, which includes all the pagenodes that have fornavbar=true. how can this be done?

the closest i was able to get so far was this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:template match="pagenode[@fornavbar='true']">
  <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

the problem with this is that includes all the children of anything matched as navbar

i only want to copy all the attributes, not all the children

but if i try

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:template match="pagenode[@fornavbar='true']">
  <pagenode title="{@title}"  url="{@url}"/>
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

then i have 2 problems

  1. i might type out each attribute separately, and i have quite a few per page and theyre apt to change eventually
  2. it loses the hierarchy. everything becomes flat one after the other

i would appreciate all and any help in the matter.

thank you!

EDIT: sample output that id like to see

<pagenode title="home" url="~/" fornavbar="true">
 <pagenode title="events" url="~/admin/events" fornavbar="true"/>
 <pagenode title="catalog" url="~/catalog" fornavbar="true"/>
</pagenode>
share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete yet very short solution that fully exploits the most fundamental XSLT design pattern. :) – Dimitre Novatchev Jan 25 '11 at 14:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can iterate over the attributes of an node using xsl:foreach select="@*" this way you don't have to copy the attributes by hand. if you call xsl:apply-templates inside of yor pagenode element you should get the desired result.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="pagenode[@fornavbar='true']">
        <pagenode>
            <xsl:for-each select="@*">
                <xsl:attribute name="{name(.)}"><xsl:value-of select="."/></xsl:attribute>
            </xsl:for-each>
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </pagenode>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

makes

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<pagenode title="home" url="~/" fornavbar="true">
    <pagenode title="events" url="~/admin/events" fornavbar="true"/>
  <pagenode title="catalog" url="~/catalog" fornavbar="true"/>
</pagenode>
share|improve this answer
    
<xsl:copy-of select="@*" /> is much more succinct – user357812 Jan 25 '11 at 17:16
    
thanks a million! it works precisely what i needed!!! your'e excellent! – Yisman Jan 26 '11 at 10:55

This is probably the shortest and purest XSLT solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*[@fornavbar = 'false']">
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<pagenode title="home" url="~/" fornavbar="true">
    <pagenode title="admin" url="~/admin" fornavbar="false">
        <pagenode title="users" url="~/admin/users" fornavbar="false"/>
        <pagenode title="events" url="~/admin/events" fornavbar="true"/>
    </pagenode>
    <pagenode title="catalog" url="~/catalog" fornavbar="true"/>
    <pagenode title="contact us" url="~/contactus" fornavbar="false"/>
</pagenode>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<pagenode title="home" url="~/" fornavbar="true">
   <pagenode title="events" url="~/admin/events" fornavbar="true"/>
   <pagenode title="catalog" url="~/catalog" fornavbar="true"/>
</pagenode>

Explanation:

  1. The identity rule (template) copies every node "as-is". Using the identity rule and overriding it is the most fundamental XSLT design pattern.

  2. There is a single template that overrides the identity rule -- for elements whose fornavbar attribute is "false". Here the specified action is to apply-templates on the children of the current element.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Good answer. Just for semantic and as reversed logic of one only rule solution, I would use *[not(self::pagenode/@fornavbar = 'true')] – user357812 Jan 25 '11 at 17:20
    
@Alejandro: Thanks. What do you mean? – Dimitre Novatchev Jan 25 '11 at 17:23
    
I mean that bypass rule will match any element having a @fornavbar attribute with 'false' string value, so the identity rule will match any element not having a @fornavbar attribute with 'false' string value, instead of pagenode elements only having a @fornavbar attribute with 'true' string value. – user357812 Jan 25 '11 at 17:29
    
@Alejandro: There are only pagenode elements in the XML document. I still don't understand... ? – Dimitre Novatchev Jan 25 '11 at 17:34

XSLT should look like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
  <xsl:template match="pagenode[@fornavbar='true']">
    <pagenode>
      <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
      <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </pagenode>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
Must be leftovers from my test. – akond Jan 25 '11 at 17:18
    
+1 For the simplest correction. – user357812 Jan 25 '11 at 17:57

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