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I wondering if there's a way to not have to repeat the same if construction but rather call a StatusCheck(). It can't return true when it succeeds. Anyone knows a better title for this question?

bool Enable()
{
    if (!GetStatus(ref status)) { Trace.WriteLine("Error"); return false; }
    // do stuff

    if (!GetStatus(ref status)) { Trace.WriteLine("Error"); return false; }
    // do more stuff

    if (!GetStatus(ref status)) { Trace.WriteLine("Error"); return false; }
    // do even more stuff

    // 6 more times the above

    return true;
}
share|improve this question
    
the real code has 6 times the same line? –  Gerardo Grignoli Jan 25 '11 at 12:25
1  
I hope that isn't indicative of the actual code. Is there a reason why it calls the same method 9 times? –  George Stocker Jan 25 '11 at 12:26
    
The real code executes a number of methods that all depend on the previous one succeeding. Every one of those methods updates the status. The methods being executed are not my code. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:28
    
@stijn Why the ref status though? –  George Stocker Jan 25 '11 at 12:32
    
Not my choice, that's how the SDK I'm working with, works. I have to call a method, get the status, and depending on the new status I can call the next method or I can stop the Enable() function. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:36

11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can create a CheckStatus() method that throws an exception if the status is not valid, then handle that exception in your Enable() method:

public void CheckStatus(int status)
{
    if (!IsValidStatus(status)) {
        throw new InvalidStatusException(status);
    }
}

public bool Enable()
{
    try {
        CheckStatus(status);
        // do stuff

        CheckStatus(status);
        // do more stuff

        CheckStatus(status);
        // do even more stuff

        // 6 more times the above

        return true;

    } catch (InvalidStatusException) {
        Trace.WriteLine("Error");
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good point. I think I'd be inclined to combine this approach with my suggestion to refactor the "do stuff"/"do even more stuff" code out into subroutines. –  Neil Barnwell Jan 25 '11 at 12:34
2  
As a principle you should never throw an exception as part of the normal program flow, it works but it can decrease performance and some debugging can be trickier. –  David Mårtensson Jan 25 '11 at 12:35
2  
@David, well, that depends. Is getting an invalid status really "part of the normal program flow"? :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jan 25 '11 at 12:38
    
Also an option, one I've thought of but I wasn't sure if it's a good way. Thanks. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:38
1  
@Frédéric Hamidi: :) Of course for this particular one situation the debugger noise is not important. But that may become huge if he sprinkles this pattern all over the place (quite likely, since that's how his SDK is structured). Then we'll probably get 100+ first chance exceptions during a normal run. The solution is probably to use a better designed SDK :P –  kizzx2 Jan 25 '11 at 16:51

Depending on how serious you want to be you could build some kind of action-queue for it breaking out the "do-stuff" in methods.

protected delegate void DoStuffDelegate(ref {TYPE} statusToCheck);

bool Enable()
{
  List<DoStuffDelegate> stuffToDo = new ...
  stuffToDo.Add(myFirstMethod);
  stuffToDo.Add(mySecondMethod);
  foreach(var myDelegate in stuffToDo)
  {
    if(!GetStatus(ref status)) { Trace.WriteLine("Error"); return false; }
    myDelegate(ref status);
  }
}

Both for good and bad C# doesn't allow any other construct (like preprocessor defines or such that we´ve got in C++).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - that is a nice solution –  Axarydax Jan 25 '11 at 12:31
    
This looks like an option, I'll try it out. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:32
    
Delegates, list of delegates, iteration - instead of plain method. It's cool, but much more complex. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 25 '11 at 12:34
    
Elegant solution :) –  David Mårtensson Jan 25 '11 at 12:36
    
And they say I always overcomplicate stuff :) GL –  Almund Jan 25 '11 at 12:43

I would have the code represented by the "Do stuff" comments refactored out into methods. You call those methods and either catch exceptions or check the return value of those methods (which may be the current status), rather than repeatedly calling GetStatus().

Also, I don't understand why a method called GetStatus() would have a ref parameter that would seem to be updated by the method with the current status? If you have to have the GetStatus() method I'd have GetStatus() take no arguments, and actually return the current status instead.

I.e.

Status status = GetStatus();

If you chose to allow those methods to throw exceptions then be careful that you don't start applying real logic when those exceptions are thrown - exceptions are not the right way to control program flow.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think @Stijn is calling GetStatus() every time because the status might have changed, so he wants to bail out of Enable() method as soon as possible –  Axarydax Jan 25 '11 at 12:26
    
@Axarydax Yeah I thought that too. That's why I proposed return values from those methods indicating the status as a result of calling the method, rather than just repeatedly hitting the GetStatus() method (especially as it has a ref parameter that appears to indicate the status...) –  Neil Barnwell Jan 25 '11 at 12:30
    
The "do stuff" isn't much at all. It calls an SDK method (which on its turn calls unmanaged code), and the SDK isn't in my control. Also see my comment to the question. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:35
1  
@Stijn Ahh okay. In that case then I'd just go with Frédéric's suggestion to wrap the thing in a big try-catch, change GetStatus() to ValidateStatus() and have it throw an exception if it's not safe to go on. –  Neil Barnwell Jan 25 '11 at 12:42
1  
@Stijn To be clear, if you were in control of the code and had lots of actual code in place of those comments, I'd combine my suggestion with Frédéric's. –  Neil Barnwell Jan 25 '11 at 12:43

You could use exceptions, and let the exception propagate upwards.

void GetStatusAndException(ref Status) {
    if (!GetStatus(ref status))) Throw new Exception("Status exception");
}

If you don't want exceptions, there's nothing much you can do about that, except putting everything except the return into the method:

bool GetStatusAndTrace(ref Status) {
    bool result = GetStatus(ref status))
    if (!result) Trace.WriteLine("Error");
    return result;
}

bool Enable()
{
    if (!GetStatusAndTrace(ref status))  return false; 
    // do stuff

    if (!GetStatusAndTrace(ref status))  return false; 
    // do more stuff

    if (!GetStatusAndTrace(ref status)) return false; 
    // do even more stuff

    // 6 more times the above

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see much value in having a method that either: 1) returns true, 2) throws (I think there are a few cases in the BCL, though). If there's only one possible result, why return a value? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 25 '11 at 12:34
    
What's the need for the return value if you're generating an exception? Just call the method and assume everything is okay if it returns. –  Jonathan Wood Jan 25 '11 at 12:36
    
This kind of reminds me of an "idiom" that I've purged from the code I'm working on: if(bad) { throw new Exception(); return false; } else { return true; } –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 25 '11 at 12:41
    
yea, copied-pasted too much of the original... fixed –  Yochai Timmer Jan 25 '11 at 12:44

A possible solution is to create a "sanity" wrapper for the API you're working with:

class Wrapper
{
    public void DoStuff() // Add static modifiers, parameters and return values as necessary
    {
        API.DoStuff();
        CheckStatus();
    }

    public void DoSomeOtherStuff()
    {
        API.DoSomeOtherStuff();
        CheckStatus();
    }

    private void CheckStatus()
    {
        Status status = default(Status);
        if(!GetStatus(ref status)) throw new InvalidStatusException();
    }
}

A little bit of work, but it allows your client code to be much more readable:

bool Enable()
{
    try
    {
        Wrapper.DoStuff();
        Wrapper.DoSomeMoreStuff();
        return true;
    }
    catch(InvalidStatusException)
    {
        Trace.WriteLine("Error");
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea, thank you. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:54

How about this? It requires minimal changes to your existing code. yield returnis your friend; let the compiler do all the dirty work:

IEnumerable<bool> StatusChecks()
{
    // Do stuff
    yield return GetStatus( ref status );
    // Do stuff
    yield return GetStatus( ref status );
    // Do stuff
    yield return GetStatus( ref status );
}

bool Enable()
{
    foreach ( var b in StatusChecks() )
    {
        if ( !b )
        {   
            Trace.WriteLine("Error");                       
            return false;
        } 
    }
    return true;
}

or, if you don't mind a LINQ-query with side effects, simply:

bool Enable()
{
     var result = StatusChecks().All( b => b );
     if ( !result )
     {
         Trace.WriteLine("Error");                       
     }
     return result;
}
share|improve this answer

Wrap the code in a try-catch block, and rewrite your GetStatus() to throw an exception on error. If you want to do it by the book, implement your own exception inheriting from System.Exception. Then you can also add the "status" property to the exception, if you need that information later on (your code example does not indicate so however).

Something like this:

bool Enable()
{
    try
    {
        GetStatus(ref status);
        // do stuff

        GetStatus(ref status);
        // do more stuff

        GetStatus(ref status);
        // do even more stuff

        // 6 more times the above
        return true;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Trace.WriteLine("Error"); 
        return false;
    }
}

Like I said, the exception thrown and caught should really be a custom exception, but the above will work.

share|improve this answer

Let's see if I understood you right.

You can use the Specification design pattern: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specification_pattern

Instead of using harcoded validation, you should use something like an implementation of above design pattern, since provides you a more extensible way of adding rules against object states.

For example, you'd define an specification "StatusSpecification" which "does some stuff for validating if status is the right one". The result could be boolean.

A broken rules evaluator would take that boolean result and do the needed decisions (throw exception? try to recover? end application? just notice user about the error? report error?).

Summarizing: you'd need to have some "specifications loader" and execute an object state against loaded rules for the type of object. In the end, in this case, you're going to evaluate that state in a single line (from the consumer point of view), and maybe, the boolean result could be your property flag.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll read up on the pattern tonight after work, thanks. –  Stijn Jan 25 '11 at 12:53
    
Nice, if you've some question, comment here. I'll be very AFK tomorrow, but I'll try to read your comments. –  Matías Fidemraizer Jan 25 '11 at 12:59
    
This is a classic examples of how the majority of design patterns can be made obsolete by functional programming (the whole post basically just described a predicate function) –  kizzx2 Jan 25 '11 at 14:44
    
I believe you're not right with your statement. I've talked about specification, not about how to implement it. I've a couple of projects using lambda functions to define specifications. I wanted him to understand a way of solve the problem in an abstract point of view. BTW, you can implement specification with a type hierarchy, but you define them with lambda functions, which are the "validate" method of the specification. There're a lot of options! :) –  Matías Fidemraizer Jan 25 '11 at 16:22
bool Enable()
{
    try {
    if (!newProc }
    // do stuff

    if (!newProc }
    // do more stuff

    if (!newProc }
    // do even more stuff

   // 6 more times the above

   return true;
   }
   catch {
       return false;
   }
}

public function newProc()
{
    if (!GetStatus(ref status)) { Trace.WriteLine("Error"); return false; }

    throw new Exception
}
share|improve this answer

Now you don't need to use exceptions and it is still decent to read. No matter what, you still have to call something. Exceptions cost about 4000-8000 clock cycles.

bool Enable()
{
    if (GetStatus(ref status)) 
    { 
        // do stuff
        if (GetStatus(ref status)) 
        { 
            // do stuff
            if (GetStatus(ref status)) 
            { 
                // do stuff
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    Trace.WriteLine("Error"); 
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

With LINQ, you can do something like:

delegate bool StatusFunc( ref int status );

bool Enable()
{
    var funcs = new StatusFunc[] 
    {
        GetStatusA,
        GetStatusB,
        GetStatusC
    };
    return funcs.All( f => f( ref status ) );
}

Note it's a bit of a hack, because GetStatus functions have side effects (modifying status), which is a no-no in LINQ-queries.

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