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I just want to know if there is a foreach oneliner in C#, like the if oneliner (exp) ? then : else.

Greets

Wowa

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5 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you're dealing with an array then you can use the built-in static ForEach method:

Array.ForEach(yourArray, x => Console.WriteLine(x));

If you're dealing with a List<T> then you can use the built-in ForEach instance method:

yourList.ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine(x));

There's nothing built-in that'll work against any arbitrary IEnumerable<T> sequence, but it's easy enough to roll your own extension method if you feel that you need it:

yourSequence.ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine(x));

// ...

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Action<T> action)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

        foreach (T item in source)
        {
            action(item);
        }
    }
}
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Sure, you can use something like List<>::ForEach:

    List<String> s = new List<string>();
    s.Add("These");
    s.Add("Is");
    s.Add("Some");
    s.Add("Data");
    s.ForEach(_string => Console.WriteLine(_string));
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foreach line-liners could be achieved with LINQ extension methods. For example:

instead of:

var result = new List<string>();
foreach (var item in someCollection)
{
    result.Add(item.Title);
}

you could:

var result = someCollection.Select(x => x.Title).ToList();
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The primary difference between if and operator ? is that if is a statement while "?" produces an expression. I.e. you can't do this:


var _ = (exp) ? then : else; // ok

but not this:


var _ = if (exp) { then; } else { else; }; // error

So if you are looking for something like foreach expression there is no .NET type it can naturally return except for void, but there are no values of void type, so you can equally just write:


foreach (var item in collection) process(item);

In many functional languages a Unit type is used instead of void which is type with only one value. You can emulate this in .NET and create your own foreach expression:


    class Unit
    {
        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            return true;
        }

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    public static class EnumerableEx
    {
        public static Unit ForEach<TSource>(
            this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
            Action<TSource> action)
        {
            foreach (var item in source)
            {
                action(item);
            }

            return new Unit();
        }
    }

There is however hardly exists any use-case for such expressions.

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