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My enum consists of the following values:

private enum PublishStatusses{
	NotCompleted,
	Completed,
	Error
};

I want to be able to output these values in a user friendly way though.
In this SO post, there is a lot of code that I can't seem to compile..
I don't need to be able to go from string to value again.
Why is it not compiling at my machine? How can I get such a result?

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7  
Your reference to this question had me very confused, and very curious about all these features of C# enums I had never seen. But then I realized that the reason that code won't compile as C# is because it's Java. –  Carl G Oct 7 '12 at 13:31
    
possible duplicate of C# String enums –  nawfal Jun 8 '13 at 22:51
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10 Answers

up vote 82 down vote accepted

I use the Description attribute from the System.ComponentModel namespace. Simply decorate the enum:

private enum PublishStatusValue
{
    [Description("Not Completed")]
    NotCompleted,
    Completed,
    Error
};

Then use this code to retrieve it:

public static string GetDescription<T>(this T enumerationValue)
            where T : struct
        {
            Type type = enumerationValue.GetType();
            if (!type.IsEnum)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("EnumerationValue must be of Enum type", "enumerationValue");
            }

            //Tries to find a DescriptionAttribute for a potential friendly name
            //for the enum
            MemberInfo[] memberInfo = type.GetMember(enumerationValue.ToString());
            if (memberInfo != null && memberInfo.Length > 0)
            {
                object[] attrs = memberInfo[0].GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);

                if (attrs != null && attrs.Length > 0)
                {
                    //Pull out the description value
                    return ((DescriptionAttribute)attrs[0]).Description;
                }
            }
            //If we have no description attribute, just return the ToString of the enum
            return enumerationValue.ToString();

        }
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just noticed the actual extension method never used the constrained type parameter. fixed it to where the parameter uses the constrained type instead of object. –  nathan gonzalez Jul 8 '13 at 4:05
    
This example is easier to read. stackoverflow.com/questions/1415140/… –  Ray L Apr 8 at 22:01
1  
I suspect there is a significant performance hit for using reflection as described in this solution. The code for Will's method of using the ToFriendlyString extension method is much easier to understand, and its performance should be extremely fast too. –  humbads Apr 9 at 18:52
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I do this with extension methods:

public enum ErrorLevel
{
  None,
  Low,
  High,
  SoylentGreen
}

public static class ErrorLevelExtensions
{
  public static string ToFriendlyString(this ErrorLevel me)
  {
    switch(me)
    {
      case ErrorLevel.None:
        return "Everything is OK";
      case ErrorLevel.Low:
        return "SNAFU, if you know what I mean.";
      case ErrorLevel.High:
        return "Reaching TARFU levels";
      case ErrorLevel.SoylentGreen:
        return "ITS PEOPLE!!!!";
    }
  }
}
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yes, thanks for the input though. I put some remarks in noldorim's post regarding this solution. –  Boris Callens Jan 26 '09 at 11:36
    
This is quite nice, actually. Very helpful. –  Andrew Backer Jun 23 '09 at 19:18
9  
I love this so much I want to marry it. –  JustLooking Oct 21 '10 at 14:50
3  
This is so much cleaner than the Attribute answer. Nice! –  pennyrave May 6 '12 at 18:27
    
@pennyrave: Eh. Lots of UI components are expecting to find and use DisplayNameAttribute and DescriptionAttribute. In fact, now, I use these and an extension method to easily get those values out. –  Will May 6 '12 at 18:30
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The easiest solution here is to use a custom extension method (in .NET 3.5 at least - you can just convert it into a static helper method for earlier framework versions).

public static string ToCustomString(this PublishStatusses value)
{
    switch(value)
    {
        // Return string depending on value.
    }
    return null;
}

I am assuming here that you want to return something other than the actual name of the enum value (which you can get by simply calling ToString).

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Although valid, I like the attribute way more. That way I can put my toSTring method in a seperate library, whilst putting the custom string representation with the enum itself –  Boris Callens Jan 26 '09 at 11:13
    
Hey that's a neat trick –  Lemmy Jan 26 '09 at 11:16
    
Fair enough. I suppose one advantage of this method is that you can include an argument with the method specifying some state variable, and then change what string representation is returned depending on this. –  Noldorin Jan 26 '09 at 11:24
    
Yes, it all depends on the scope of the method I guess. While the Attribute way is more generic, your solution is more localized.. It's all about needs in the end. –  Boris Callens Jan 26 '09 at 11:34
    
You can put extension methods anywhere you want. You just have to reference it where you want to use them. –  Will Jan 26 '09 at 12:07
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Maybe I'm missing something, but what's wrong with Enum.GetName?

public string GetName(PublishStatusses value)
{
  return Enum.GetName(typeof(PublishStatusses), value)
}

edit: for user-friendly strings, you need to go through a .resource to get internationalisation/localisation done, and it would arguably be better to use a fixed key based on the enum key than a decorator attribute on the same.

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1  
I returns the literal value of the enum, not some user friendly one. –  Boris Callens Jan 26 '09 at 11:34
2  
oic - well there's a pretty big case that you have to go through a string resource library based on this value then, because the alternative (decorator attribs) won't support I18N –  annakata Jan 26 '09 at 11:38
    
In case of I18N I would make the GetDescription() method search in the resource lib for a translated string and fall back to the description and then fall back to the literal. –  Boris Callens Jan 26 '09 at 14:44
    
+1 for MyEnum.ToString() as the resource key for localization. i've been doing that for years –  jackvsworld Jun 18 '13 at 7:12
    
@annakata we've actually extended the attribute mechanism to include support for l18N, it's a simple change in fact. –  Ray Booysen Jan 7 at 17:51
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That other post is Java. You can't put methods in Enums in C#.

just do something like this:

PublishStatusses status = ...
String s = status.ToString();

If you want to use different display values for your enum values, you could use Attributes and Reflection.

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HA! Silly me. I'm becoming to C#centric lately :P –  Boris Callens Jan 26 '09 at 11:09
    
toString is not safe in all cases - an enum with multiple entries with the same value (say for integer enums) will return the key of the first matching value, not the key of the item tested, this is why Enum.GetName is preferred –  annakata Jan 26 '09 at 11:20
1  
Well it was the easiest solution for his specific enum –  Lemmy Jan 26 '09 at 11:38
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With respect to Ray Booysen, there is a bug in the code: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/479410/enum-tostring/479417#479417

You need to account for multiple attributes on the enum values.

public static string GetDescription<T>(this object enumerationValue)
            where T : struct
    {
        Type type = enumerationValue.GetType();
        if (!type.IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("EnumerationValue must be of Enum type", "enumerationValue");
        }

        //Tries to find a DescriptionAttribute for a potential friendly name
        //for the enum
        MemberInfo[] memberInfo = type.GetMember(enumerationValue.ToString());
        if (memberInfo != null && memberInfo.Length > 0)
        {
            object[] attrs = memberInfo[0].GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);

            if (attrs != null && attrs.Length > 0 && attrs.Where(t => t.GetType() == typeof(DescriptionAttribute)).FirstOrDefault() != null)
            {
                //Pull out the description value
                return ((DescriptionAttribute)attrs.Where(t=>t.GetType() == typeof(DescriptionAttribute)).FirstOrDefault()).Description;
            }
        }
        //If we have no description attribute, just return the ToString of the enum
        return enumerationValue.ToString();
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1  
The omission of a check for multiple Description attributes is on purpose. If the enum has two, and you're using to to generate a description, I'd like to think that is an exceptional circumstance. I think the actual bug is I don't do a Single() to have an exception thrown. Otherwise the whole method signature makes no sense. GetDescription()? Which description? An aggregate? –  Ray Booysen Apr 14 '11 at 10:43
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I created a reverse extension method to convert the description back into an enum value:

    public static T ToEnumValue<T>(this string enumerationDescription) where T : struct
    {
        Type type = typeof(T);
        if (!type.IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException("ToEnumValue<T>(): Must be of enum type", "T");
        foreach (object val in System.Enum.GetValues(type))
            if (val.GetDescription<T>() == enumerationDescription)
                return (T)val;
        throw new ArgumentException("ToEnumValue<T>(): Invalid description for enum " + type.Name, "enumerationDescription");
    }
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4  
I'm sorry, but thanks for trying to be helpful! Though because this is a Q&A site, answers should be an attempt to directly answer the question. And the question specifically states "I don't need to be able to go from string to value again." Once again, thanks! –  Jesse Apr 18 '13 at 0:31
1  
Thanks for the positive criticism. It's always difficult being new to a site and learning about its culture and nuances. I am glad there are people like you who set the new guys straight. Once again, thanks for not dumping on the new guy. –  bjrichardson May 6 '13 at 20:49
    
Hey you're welcome; we were all there once. =) –  Jesse May 6 '13 at 20:51
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If you want something completely customizable, try out my solution here:

http://www.kevinwilliampang.com/post/Mapping-Enums-To-Strings-and-Strings-to-Enums-in-NET.aspx

Basically, the post outlines how to attach Description attributes to each of your enums and provides a generic way to map from enum to description.

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chrome reports malware in your site... –  GClaramunt Oct 29 '12 at 21:38
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I happen to be a VB.NET fan, so here's my version, combining the DescriptionAttribute method with an extension method. First, the results:

Imports System.ComponentModel ' For <Description>

Module Module1
  ''' <summary>
  ''' An Enum type with three values and descriptions
  ''' </summary>
  Public Enum EnumType
    <Description("One")>
    V1 = 1

    ' This one has no description
    V2 = 2

    <Description("Three")>
    V3 = 3
  End Enum

  Sub Main()
    ' Description method is an extension in EnumExtensions
    For Each v As EnumType In [Enum].GetValues(GetType(EnumType))
      Console.WriteLine("Enum {0} has value {1} and description {2}",
        v,
        CInt(v),
        v.Description
      )
    Next
    ' Output:
    ' Enum V1 has value 1 and description One
    ' Enum V2 has value 2 and description V2
    ' Enum V3 has value 3 and description Three
  End Sub
End Module

Basic stuff: an enum called EnumType with three values V1, V2 and V3. The "magic" happens in the Console.WriteLine call in Sub Main(), where the last argument is simply v.Description. This returns "One" for V1, "V2" for V2, and "Three" for V3. This Description-method is in fact an extension method, defined in another module called EnumExtensions:

Option Strict On
Option Explicit On
Option Infer Off

Imports System.Runtime.CompilerServices
Imports System.Reflection
Imports System.ComponentModel

Module EnumExtensions
  Private _Descriptions As New Dictionary(Of String, String)

  ''' <summary>
  ''' This extension method adds a Description method
  ''' to all enum members. The result of the method is the
  ''' value of the Description attribute if present, else
  ''' the normal ToString() representation of the enum value.
  ''' </summary>
  <Extension>
  Public Function Description(e As [Enum]) As String
    ' Get the type of the enum
    Dim enumType As Type = e.GetType()
    ' Get the name of the enum value
    Dim name As String = e.ToString()

    ' Construct a full name for this enum value
    Dim fullName As String = enumType.FullName + "." + name

    ' See if we have looked it up earlier
    Dim enumDescription As String = Nothing
    If _Descriptions.TryGetValue(fullName, enumDescription) Then
      ' Yes we have - return previous value
      Return enumDescription
    End If

    ' Find the value of the Description attribute on this enum value
    Dim members As MemberInfo() = enumType.GetMember(name)
    If members IsNot Nothing AndAlso members.Length > 0 Then
      Dim descriptions() As Object = members(0).GetCustomAttributes(GetType(DescriptionAttribute), False)
      If descriptions IsNot Nothing AndAlso descriptions.Length > 0 Then
        ' Set name to description found
        name = DirectCast(descriptions(0), DescriptionAttribute).Description
      End If
    End If

    ' Save the name in the dictionary:
    _Descriptions.Add(fullName, name)

    ' Return the name
    Return name
  End Function
End Module

Because looking up description attributes using Reflection is slow, the lookups are also cached in a private Dictionary, that is populated on demand.

(Sorry for the VB.NET solution - it should be relatively straighforward to translate it to C#, and my C# is rusty on new subjects like extensions)

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This is an update to Ray Booysen's code that uses the generic GetCustomAttributes method and LINQ to make things a bit tidier.

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the value of the <see cref="T:System.ComponentModel.DescriptionAttribute"/> on an struct, including enums.  
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the struct.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="enumerationValue">A value of type <see cref="T:System.Enum"/></param>
    /// <returns>If the struct has a Description attribute, this method returns the description.  Otherwise it just calls ToString() on the struct.</returns>
    /// <remarks>Based on http://stackoverflow.com/questions/479410/enum-tostring/479417#479417, but useful for any struct.</remarks>
    public static string GetDescription<T>(this T enumerationValue) where T : struct
    {
        return enumerationValue.GetType().GetMember(enumerationValue.ToString())
                .SelectMany(mi => mi.GetCustomAttributes<DescriptionAttribute>(false),
                    (mi, ca) => ca.Description)
                .FirstOrDefault() ?? enumerationValue.ToString();
    }   
share|improve this answer
    
Failing to see why you need it to be generic? If you're going to use reflection? –  Lee Louviere Jul 5 '13 at 15:05
    
@LeeLouviere Mainly to avoid the boxing when the struct (value type) is passed as a parameter. –  Richard Hein Jul 5 '13 at 19:00
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