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Was going through a Python Tutorial and have asked a related question here(Code from my previous example and thanks to @emmanuel)

Code:

import math, time
class PrimeFactor:
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def isprime(self,number):
        start=time.clock()
        fnum = [1,]
        print "Reticulating Splines..."
        last = int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(number)))
        for p in range(2, last + 1):
            if (number % p) == 0:
                fnum.append(p)
                fnum.append(number / p)
        # Remove duplicates, sort list
        fnum = list(set(fnum))
        fnum.sort()
        end=time.clock()
        if len(fnum) > 1:
            return number, "is not a prime because of these factors", fnum ,"Time taken", end-start
        else:
            return True, "Time taken", end-start

print "Prime or factor calculator v3 using sqrt(n)"
print #

num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))
eg=PrimeFactor()

print eg.isprime(num)

From this code, I tried to get the variable fnum which is local to the function(method) isprime, which contains the factor list. Accessing it by calling

print eg.isprime(num).fnum

gave me a error

AttributeError: 'tuple' object has no attribute 'fnum'    

I guess I cannot call a local variable that way.

Plus the code is not reusable. So I decided to do a rewrite, to make it more modular.

Rewritten Code:

import math
class PrimeFactor:
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def isPrime(self,number):
        fnum = [1,]
        last = int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(number)))
        for p in range(2, last + 1):
            if (number % p) == 0:
                return False
            else:
                return True
    def getFactors(self,number):
        fnum = [1,]
        last = int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(number)))
        for p in range(2, last + 1):
            if (number % p) == 0:
                fnum.append(p)
                fnum.append(number / p)
        # Remove duplicates, sort list
        fnum = list(set(fnum))
        fnum.sort()
        if len(fnum) > 1:
            return fnum
        else:
            return None


num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))
eg=PrimeFactor()

if eg.isPrime(num):
    print num, "is a Prime Number"
else:
    print num, "is not a prime number"
    print "Factors", eg.getFactors(num)

I had to forgo time calculation. I can calculate time while using an instance.

Question:

Can I access the local variable fnum in my previous example? If yes, How?(I guess no). If no, then is the rewritten code good enough or am I doing it wrong?

share|improve this question
    
After the function returns, its local variables are gone. Everything that might be used by the caller should be returned to the caller. –  Sven Marnach Jan 25 '11 at 14:01
    
@Sven So I could ask it to return a dict instead, with the first dict entry being a bool carrying whether the number is a prime, followed by a second item which will contain the factor list. That will save some time. I could then do away with the extra method –  abel Jan 25 '11 at 14:04
3  
Just return a tuple, but without those strings. And while you are at it, also trash your class and use simple functions. Your class does not do anything. –  Sven Marnach Jan 25 '11 at 14:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem with your modification is that you're duplicating the calculus. I understand you just want to get the calculated factors, which just involves creating fnum as an attribute:

import math, time
class PrimeFactor:
    def __init__(self):
        self.fnum = [1,]
        self.elapsedTime = 0
    def getElapsedTime(self):
        return self.elapsedTime
    def getFactors(self):
        return self.fnum
    def isprime(self,number):
        start=time.clock()
        self.fnum = [1,]
        last = int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(number)))
        for p in range(2, last + 1):
            if (number % p) == 0:
                self.fnum.append(p)
                self.fnum.append(number / p)
        # Remove duplicates, sort list
        self.fnum = list(set(self.fnum))
        self.fnum.sort()
        end=time.clock()
        self.elapsedTime = end-start
        return (not len(self.fnum) > 1 )

num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))
eg=PrimeFactor()

if eg.isprime(num):
    print num, "is a Prime Number", eg.isprime(num)
else:
    print num, "is not a prime number"
    print "Factors", eg.getFactors()
print eg.getElapsedTime()

You could even develop the code a little bit more and take advantage of the previous calculated factors, thus using dynamic programming.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
That means, if I call PrimeFactor.getFactors(), isprime will still be executed? I am a OOP noob. –  abel Jan 25 '11 at 14:11
    
Nope, but you can easily solve that, if you're interested. You just have to prepend to self.getFactors(): if ( self.fnum < 2 ): self.isPrime( 101 ) –  Baltasarq Jan 25 '11 at 14:13
    
I have edited your code for some typos. I didn't know how to create attributes. –  abel Jan 25 '11 at 14:22
    
@abel, that's fine. About attributes, Python is a little bit different to other programming languages. As you can see, you just create them by assigning them a value inside the constructor init –  Baltasarq Jan 25 '11 at 21:13

You need:

print eg.isprime(num)[2]

(your method is returning a tuple, and you need the third member, that's all)

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. The return is a tuple. –  abel Jan 25 '11 at 14:07

There is no way to access the local variables of a function from outside that function. You need to explicitly make them available to callers, either by returning them, or by writing their values into a container available to the caller.

share|improve this answer
1  
the OP is indeed returning the variables s/he wants in the first example - s/he's just trying to access them the wrong way –  simon Jan 25 '11 at 14:05
    
@simon - Your answer is correct but needs to have Ned's explanation to make it clear why the OP is nots eeing what he expects –  Mark Jan 25 '11 at 14:10

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