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I wonder how do programmers refactor code that is written in languages like Ruby, Python?

Assuming you get code after a 'previous' guy—so you cannot be sure about quality of tests and their coverage.

Do you use any specific approach?

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Pretty much the same way people did it for years before IDEs offered fancy refactoring tools. People actually used to write C++ code (and even C) before Visual Studio... –  Cody Gray Jan 25 '11 at 14:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without an IDE, you will have to take smaller steps, well protected by comprehensive unit tests. Martin Fowler's Refactoring, written before all the software tools were available, is a pretty good guide to how to refactor safely. You take small steps, checking all along that you're not breaking anything, frequently leaving original code in place until the replacement has been completed. It's tedious but doable.

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To refactor code in Python, you can use RopeVim.

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You can use default command lines in linux to refactoring –  Tarsis Azevedo Feb 13 '11 at 16:44

in vim you can use the following command to search for things:

/spock

and get all instances of spock by pressing n to cycle through the file.

To search and replace, you can use this:

:%s/spock/kirk/g

which will replace all instances of spock with kirk. Vim has some pretty powerful stuff, but you can also use find/sed/grep to do entire directories or projects.

Good luck!

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I think the OP was looking more for more automated tools for extracting a method, syntax-aware find-and-replace, etc. This answer is totally true, but not sufficient to answer the question itself. –  mrisher Mar 31 at 3:07

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