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I'm reading a book which says not to use such a code:

private volatile Thread myThread;

....

myThread.stop();

Instead one should use:

if (myThread != null ) {

 Thread dummy = myThread;

 myThread = null;

 dummy.interrupt();


}

Unfortunately the subject is not elaborated any further... Could someone explain me this?

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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Everyone has given great information on why not to call Thread.stop().

Sergey's comment fixed the incorrect information I gave about interrupt() handling. I prefer to use a signal flag, like in lewap's answer. Like Sergey's said, interrupt() is for the purpose of waking up a thread that's in a blocked operation. If your thread doesn't call any blocking operations, then interrupt() won't actually terminate the thread. Your thread though can call isInterrupted() to see if interrupt has been called (a signal flag, basically).

Going back to your book's example, I don't like it.

if (myThread != null ) {

    Thread dummy = myThread;

    myThread = null;

    dummy.interrupt();

}

There's no good reason to copy to a dummy variable in this example. You are right to be confused.

The book authors might be thinking about trying to prevent other threads from simultaneously attempting to interrupt the same thread, but that interruption code is not thread safe (the "check if null and set to null" operation is not atomic), so writing the dummy assignment is muddying the waters without adding actual thread safety.

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1  
Interruping a thread doesn't always generate an exception. Only a fixed set of blocking operations do that, so it's not correct to say that an exception could be thrown anywhere. A boolean flag and interrupting actually just solve different problems - one is for signaling a thread that is doing something actively, another one is to wake up a thread that is blocked somewhere (it could still check a boolean flag after it wakes up). Also, InterruptedException is a checked exception so it is pretty hard to accidentally forget to handle it. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 25 '11 at 15:46
    
Ah, my mistake. Thank you, I corrected my post. –  Astral Jan 25 '11 at 15:56
1  
The posted code IS NOT correct! Must be smth like: 'Thread dummy = myThread; if (dummy!=null){ this.myThread=null; dummy.interrupt();}' What you have now is the classiest of the most classic data race conditions. –  bestsss Jan 25 '11 at 16:13
    
What you posted is susceptible to race conditions just the same! What if two threads execute dummy = myThread very close to each other, before the other thread sets this.myTHread=null? It's the same problem, no matter the order of operations. –  Astral Jan 27 '11 at 16:06
    
you end up calling interrupt() twice, which is absolutely ok. In the other variant you get NPE, which is 'at least' unexpected. –  bestsss Jan 27 '11 at 22:28
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stop() is deprecated. Never never and never use stop(). You can use java concurrency instead.

From Javadoc :

This method is inherently unsafe. Stopping a thread with Thread.stop causes it to unlock all of the monitors that it has locked (as a natural consequence of the unchecked ThreadDeath exception propagating up the stack). If any of the objects previously protected by these monitors were in an inconsistent state, the damaged objects become visible to other threads, potentially resulting in arbitrary behavior. Many uses of stop should be replaced by code that simply modifies some variable to indicate that the target thread should stop running. The target thread should check this variable regularly, and return from its run method in an orderly fashion if the variable indicates that it is to stop running. If the target thread waits for long periods (on a condition variable, for example), the interrupt method should be used to interrupt the wait.

Have a look at Java Concurrency in Practice chapter 7 (Cancellation and Shutdown)

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yeah but why copy and interrupt it, rather than directly interrupt it? –  Mascarpone Jan 25 '11 at 15:04
    
I don't know whole code maybe it depends other issue like synchronization. plus it has a good name dummy that you can .interrupt() and set null without coping it –  user467871 Jan 25 '11 at 15:09
1  
just b/c it's "deprecated", it doesn't mean you can't or should Never use it. I have use cases when it's necessary to stop 3rd party libraries which are poorly coded (for instance). While I agree it shan't be used where one have full control over the executing code, I do disagree w/ the never part. –  bestsss Jan 25 '11 at 16:08
1  
@Muad'Dib b/c it's volatile. check a volatile like that: 'if (x!=null) x.doWhatever()' has not meaning IF x can be null'd by some other thread. Also it's way cheaper to assign and use local copies of volatiles rather than the variable itself (volatile reads require full memory fence which is quite slow) –  bestsss Jan 25 '11 at 16:12
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You can find a great answer on why not to use the stop() method here. Instead of using this method you can hold a boolean variable and loop infinitely using this variable:

public class MyRunnable extends Runnable {
    public volatile boolean keepRunning = true;
    public void run() {
        while (keepRunning) {
            ... // do what you have to do
        }
    }
}

Once you decide to finish, you just have to set the keepRunning variable to false. Your thread will then: - finish the remaining steps - terminate

Like that you finish your work in a controlled manner and don't use the unsafe stop() method.

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3  
keepRunning should be declared volatile. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 25 '11 at 15:42
    
Thanks for the advice with the volatile keyword! –  paweloque Jan 25 '11 at 16:03
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Thread.stop is deprecated and should not be used (more info here).

The example code appears to nullify the reference to "myThread" and then signal for it to interrupt. Assuming "myThread" was the only reference to your thread and the code running in the thread is handling interrupt requests properly (and not ignoring them), the thread would end and be eligible for garbage collection when the "if (myThread != null)" code block completes.

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yeah but why copy and interrupt it, rather than directly interrupt it? –  Mascarpone Jan 25 '11 at 15:00
    
Perhaps to prevent multiple calls to interrupt "myThread". Another call to that method would detect that myThread was null and not attempt to execute the code block again. Synchronization would need to be handled, but I suspect it was intended to be a simple example rather than a complete one. –  jt. Jan 25 '11 at 15:07
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Despite the fact that Thread.stop is deprecated. It is also useful to know that with Thread.stop you can circumvent copmiler checked exception control. For example,

public void doSomething(){
    Thread.currentThread().stop(new IOException());
}

That will throw an IOException. An IOException is a checked checked exception and the compiler normally will force the client to catch or let the method throw it. Here doSomething throws an unchecked IOException

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The verifier doesn't insists on checked exceptions. Also for the code to work it requires "stopThread" permission. –  bestsss Jan 25 '11 at 16:20
    
What do you mean insists on checked exceptions. On a standard hotspot vm I was easily able to run this line of code - seems the permissions are offered by default. –  John Vint Jan 25 '11 at 16:28
    
Sure, you can :). Not running in a sandbox (like applet, web-start), just java ... grants full permissions. As for 'insisting', the checking is a part of the compiler only, the real run-time (verifier) doesn't check (and distinct) between checked and not-checked exceptions: all throwables are the same. –  bestsss Jan 25 '11 at 18:43
    
Well of course runtime doesnt check. I specifically said 'circumvent copmiler checked exception control' The fact you can throw an unchecked IOException is not expected functionality. That was my point –  John Vint Jan 25 '11 at 19:04
    
To do that: it's much easier to edit the bytecode a little (remove the throws mambo-jambo part) and it can be executed under security manager as well. –  bestsss Jan 25 '11 at 21:49
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In addition to what @Paweloque has suggested (which is a perfect way), there is another alternative to using stop() suggested here

The Wrong Way:

Suppose your applet contains the following start, stop and run methods:

private Thread blinker;

public void start() {
    blinker = new Thread(this);
    blinker.start();
}

public void stop() {
    blinker.stop();  // UNSAFE!
}

public void run() {
    Thread thisThread = Thread.currentThread();
    while (true) {
        try {
            thisThread.sleep(interval);
        } catch (InterruptedException e){
        }
        repaint();
    }
}

The Correct Way

You can avoid the use of Thread.stop by replacing the applet's stop and run methods with: private volatile Thread blinker;

public void stop() {
    blinker = null;
}

public void run() {
    Thread thisThread = Thread.currentThread();
    while (blinker == thisThread) {
        try {
            thisThread.sleep(interval);
        } catch (InterruptedException e){
        }
        repaint();
    }
}
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