Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to revert a particular commit in git. Unfortunately, our organization still uses CVS as a standard, so when I commit back to CVS multiple git commits are rolled into one. In this case I would love to single out the original git commit, but that is impossible.

Is there an approach similar to git add --patch that would allow me to selectively edit diffs to decide which parts of a commit to revert?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Use the --no-commit (-n) option to git revert, then unstage the changes, then use git add --patch:

$ git revert -n $bad_commit    # Revert the commit, but don't commit the changes
$ git reset HEAD .             # Unstage the changes
$ git add --patch .            # Add whatever changes you want
$ git commit                   # Commit those changes

Note: The files you add using git add --patch are the files you want to revert, not the files you want to keep.

share|improve this answer
8  
May be worth adding the final required command, for those not so familiar with git: after committing, git reset --hard to discard the other changes which you didn't want to revert. –  tremby Sep 26 '12 at 21:03
2  
git reset --hard is dangerous for newbies, as it might loose wanted edits. Instead get used to git status, this hints for git checkout -- FILE.. to revert things more safely. –  Tino Jul 16 '13 at 10:30

I have used the following successfully:

git revert --no-commit <sha1>
git reset -p                   # interactively remove the GOOD changes from index
git commit -m "Partially revert <sha1>..."

First revert the full commit (puts it in index) but don't commit, then remove the GOOD changes (not to be reverted) from the index, finally committing reverse diff of the bad changes.

share|improve this answer

You can use git-revert -n, and then use add --patch to select hunks.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.