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I've got this code, but it doesn't seem to return true. The alert always shows up. Any thoughts (without needing to create a var in which to store that a checkbox has been selected as that just seems a bit hacky).

Thanks.

$("#form").submit(function(e) {
    $('input[type=checkbox]').each(function () {
        if(this.checked){
            return true;
        }
    });
    alert("Please select at least one to upgrade.");
    return false;
});
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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You don't need to do the loop to determine if a checkbox is checked. The :checked selector filters out all that are not checked. Then you can use $.length to get a count of the checked inputs.

$("#form").submit(function(e) {
    if(!$('input[type=checkbox]:checked').length) {
        alert("Please select at least one to upgrade.");

        //stop the form from submitting
        return false;
    }

    return true;
});

Additionally, using your approach, a small change should make this work

$("#form").submit(function(e) {
    $('input[type=checkbox]').each(function () {
        if($(this).is(':checked')){
            return true;
        }
    });
    alert("Please select at least one to upgrade.");
    return false;
});

I think you may be simply missing the $() around this

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Thanks. A nice clean solution. I went for your own version as it seems more readable. –  edwardmlyte Jan 26 '11 at 9:23
    
I came across an issue recently where e.preventDefault() does not work with Firefox. With some research, I found that returning true or false will do the same thing and is more widely accepted. I have altered my answer to reflect this approach. –  Josh Aug 15 '13 at 16:21

Just to point out, you're using the id reference #form. Did you mean to just refer to all forms, or does the form have the id form?

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It has a different id, which is what I'm actually referencing. I just changed it to simplify. –  edwardmlyte Jan 25 '11 at 16:21

Example of checking the number of checboxes checked...

<script>

    function countChecked() {
      var n = $("input:checked").length;
      $("div").text(n + (n <= 1 ? " is" : " are") + " checked!");
    }
    countChecked();
    $(":checkbox").click(countChecked);

</script>

Above "$("input:checked")" returns the array of checked items... You could check the "length" of this array for being > 0.

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Seems a bit redundant to do this if i'm already looping the array with jquery. But I do get your point, I was hoping I'd be able to just continue the submit if at least one is checked. –  edwardmlyte Jan 25 '11 at 16:20

Code for click and enter the submit button :

 $(":input").bind("click keypress", function(evt) {   
     var keyCode = evt.which || evt.keyCode;
     var sender = evt.target;                 
     if (keyCode == 13 || sender.type == "submit") {                        
        evt.preventDefault();  
        // add your validations
     }
     // and submit the form
 }
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