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I have two methods that do very similar things but with a different return type (string vs int)

Here they are:

private static string LoadAttributeString(this XElement xmlElement, 
                                          string attributeName, string defaultValue)
{
    try
        {return xmlElement.Attribute(attributeName).Value;}
    catch (Exception)
        {return defaultValue;}
}

private static int LoadAttributeInt(this XElement xmlElement, 
                                    string attributeName, int defaultValue)
{
    try
        {return int.Parse(xmlElement.Attribute(attributeName).Value);}
    catch (Exception)
        {return defaultValue;}
}

Is it possible to use generics to combine these into one method? (I tried and failed.)

NOTE: I am fine having two different methods. I would just like to expand my knowledge of generics. So I thought I would ask if it is possible.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes. Use Convert.ChangeType instead of a specific parsing function.

private static T LoadAttribute<T>(this XElement xmlElement, 
                                  string attributeName, 
                                  T defaultValue)
                                  where T : IConvertible
{
    try
    {
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(
            xmlElement.Attribute(attributeName).Value, 
            typeof(T));
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return defaultValue;
    }
}

By the way, catching Exception is generally a bad idea. Do you definitely want to hide null reference bugs?

As I like the generality of Jared's answer, I can't resist rewriting mine as a mere overload to his:

private static T LoadAttribute<T>(this XElement xmlElement, 
                                  string attributeName,
                                  T defaultValue) 
                                  where T : IConvertible
{
    return LoadAttribute(
        xmlElement, 
        attributeName, 
        x => (T)Convert.ChangeType(x, typeof(T)), 
        defaultValue);
}
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virtual -1. This only works for types that implement IConvertible. –  Aliostad Jan 25 '11 at 16:45
2  
I'm glad it's a virtual -1, as the question asks about int and string, which are supported by Convert.ChangeType. –  Daniel Earwicker Jan 25 '11 at 16:46
    
@Daniel Earwicker - I agree that usually it is a bad idea to catch Exception. But in this case I really just want to either load the value, or a default. I don't care what goes wrong, if ANYTHING goes wrong at this point I want a default value. –  Vaccano Jan 25 '11 at 16:52
1  
@Vaccano - I hear ya... I just wonder if in a few months time you'll wish you had a stack trace, not just a default value. :) –  Daniel Earwicker Jan 25 '11 at 16:53
1  
@Vaccano - I've added the necessary where modifier to restrict T to types that implement IConvertible. –  Daniel Earwicker Jan 25 '11 at 17:04
show 3 more comments

Try the following

private static T LoadAttribute<T>(
  this XElement xmlElement, 
  string attributeName,
  Func<string, T> convertFunc,
  T defaultValue) {

  try {
    return convertFunc(xmlElement.Attribute(attributeName).Value); 
  } catch (Exception) {
    return defaultValue;
  }
}

Here are some example use cases for string and int

LoadAttribute(xmlElement, someName, x => x, defaultValue);  // string
LoadAttribute(xmlElement, someName, Int32.Parse, defaultValue);  // int
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Minor gripe, but wouldn't Converter<string, T> be more appropriate? ;) –  x0n Jan 25 '11 at 16:49
1  
@x0n, i prefer to use the Func<...> and Action<...> versions over their named counter parts. I don't know of any guidelines in this area but my experiences in other languages (F# in particular) shaped my preference of this pattern. –  JaredPar Jan 25 '11 at 16:52
1  
the Converter<in TIn, out TOut> is contra-/covariant in .NET 4 though, whereas the Func<T1, TResult> is not. –  herzmeister Jan 25 '11 at 17:42
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