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I have written a Windows application, that can take in some command line arguments and can be run from the command line as a scheduled task. It all works fine, but I am trying to give the user some feedback on the console if they launch it from thee.

I have used the information described in Console Output from a Windows Forms Application and have got some output on the command line, but when the application finishes it does not drop back to the command prompt unless you hit enter. It just sits there waiting.

What am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
Console.WriteLine("Press enter to exit")
Console.ReadLine()

before the program ends.

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You need to pause it somehow after execution or the window will exit quickly. There are several ways to pause, but in this case you want to be able to execute it as a scheduled task (with no pause) and by a user (with pause).

The simplest approach to this is simply to create a .BAT-file the user runs. For example:

@echo off
start /B /wait yourapp.exe
pause

The start command has several parameters you may want to look into. Type start /? on the command-line.

Another approach is to use a pause like Console.ReadLine(); or System.Threading.Tread.Sleep(1000 * 10); inside your application. You can use command line paramters to regulate this, for example:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  // DoSomeStuff

  // Pause if not "nopause" is specified.
  if (args.Count == 0 || args[0] == "nopause")
  {
    Console.Write("Press any key to continue.");
    Console.ReadLine();
  }
}

(The sample can surely be written better, just giving you a general idea)

With the above sample the scheduled task can call the .exe with nopause param like: myapp.exe nopause.

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