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Lets play some simple-golf. This is like code-golf, but rather than going for very few characters, we want to make a very simple implementation.

Here's my implementation of a Cartesian product for a jagged 2D array in JavaScript. How much more simple can it be made?

/* Calculate the cartesian product of a jagged list.
 *
 * Examples:
 *  cart_prod([[1],[2]])
 *  >>> [[1, 2]]
 * 
 *  cart_prod([[1],[2, 3]])
 *  >>> [[1,2], [1,3]]
 * 
 *  cart_prod([[1, 2],[3, 4]])
 *  >>> [[1, 3], [1, 4], [2, 3], [2,4]] */
function cart_prod(list) {
    var first = list[0];
    var rest = list.slice(1);

    if (first) {
        var output = [];

        if (rest.length > 0) {
            var prod_rest = cart_prod(rest);

            for (var i = 0; i < prod_rest.length; i++) {
                for (var j = 0; j < first.length; j++) {
                    output.push([first[j]].concat(prod_rest[i]));
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (var j = 0; j < first.length; j++) {
                output.push([first[j]]);
            }
        }

        return output;
    } else {
        return [];
    }
}
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closed as off topic by Will Apr 1 '12 at 4:03

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7  
Code golf is language agnostic. "Improvement Desired" is probably what this falls under. –  Vivin Paliath Jan 25 '11 at 17:19
    
@Vivin, code golf itself can be an educational pursuit. Why can't a questioner seek that particular education in a particular language? A broader question has a broader educational surface, but a narrower question can potentially reveal techniques in a given language that won't usually come out in generic code golf questions—particularly for a language like JavaScript which isn't terribly popular for code golf. –  eyelidlessness Jan 25 '11 at 18:41
1  
@eyelidlessness I'm not arguing against the merits of this question (notice that I didn't vote to close), but code golf is a very general term. Javascript-golf might be more suitable, or "improvement desirable" as I mentioned before. –  Vivin Paliath Jan 25 '11 at 20:18
2  
Whithin the Code-Golf tag specification All popular programming languages should be allowed. stackoverflow.com/tags/code-golf/info. So, you need to open to other languages, or change tags –  belisarius Jan 25 '11 at 23:32
2  
Look out for the Code Golf site when the public beta launches on 3 Feb. –  marcog Jan 29 '11 at 19:57
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Assuming you are using Javascript 1.7,

function product() {
    return Array.prototype.reduce.call(arguments, function(as, bs) {
        return [a.concat(b) for each (a in as) for each (b in bs)]
    }, [[]]);
}

product([1, 2, 3], [4], [5, 6]); # => [[1, 4, 5], [1, 4, 6], [2, 4, 5], [2, 4, 6], [3, 4, 5], [3, 4, 6]]

seems pretty simple and elegant to me.


If we're allowing other languages, this is pretty easy in Haskell.

cartesianProduct :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
cartesianProduct [] = [[]]
cartesianProduct (list:lists) =
    [ x:xs | x <- list, xs <- cartesianProduct lists ]

Or, in short,

cartesianProduct = sequence

In J, this is a built-in.

   { 1 2 3 ; 4 ; 5 6
+-----+-----+
|1 4 5|1 4 6|
+-----+-----+
|2 4 5|2 4 6|
+-----+-----+
|3 4 5|3 4 6|
+-----+-----+
share|improve this answer
    
@ephemient for each is not valid in JS. Please mark it as pseudo code or make it valid. –  Raynos Jan 26 '11 at 12:57
    
@Raynos: It is in Javascript 1.7. –  ephemient Jan 26 '11 at 15:56
1  
@ephemient my bad that is valid in firefox (valid in 1.6 exactly). I've never seen syntax like that. But it's not valid ECMAScript :( –  Raynos Jan 26 '11 at 16:28
    
I like this. What browsers currently support 1.7? –  John Jan 26 '11 at 17:11
    
@John 1.7 is Mozilla (i.e. Firefox) specific. You can write something similar using external libraries like coffeescript or underscore.js which is cross-browser. –  Raynos Jan 26 '11 at 18:01
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What's wrong with.

function cart_prod(X, Y) {
    var out = [];
    for (var i in X) for (var j in Y) out.push([X[i], Y[j]]);
    return out;                     
}

This seems simple enough to me and returns the cartesian product. (Ignore the one line double for loop. It's valid and this is code golf).

If you must you can use

function cart_prod2(list) {
     return cart_prod(list[0], list[1]);
}
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1  
The major issue here is that it doesn't work for any number of elements. See ephemient's answer. –  John Jan 26 '11 at 17:10
1  
@John this only calculates the cartesian product of two sets. –  Raynos Jan 26 '11 at 18:00
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To make ephemient's code work in any browser, you can use a JavaScript library such as jPaq and then use the following code:

function cartesianProductOf() {
  return Array.prototype.reduce.call(arguments, function(a, b) {
    var ret = [];
    a.forEach(function(a) {
      b.forEach(function(b) {
        ret.push(a.concat([b]));
      });
    });
    return ret;
  }, [[]]);
}

If you use jPaq, make sure you build a version that contains both Array.prototype.reduce and Array.prototype.forEach.

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