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I want to do a Full Outer Join in MySQL. Is this possible? Is a Full Outer Join supported by MySQL?

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1  
possible duplicate of MySQL Full Outer Join Syntax Error –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 25 '11 at 17:39
1  
This question have better answers –  Julio Marins Nov 3 '14 at 20:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 193 down vote accepted

You don't have FULL JOINS on MySQL, but you can sure emulate them.

For a code SAMPLE transcribed from this SO question you have:

with two tables t1, t2:

SELECT * FROM t1
LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
UNION
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
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3  
BY making a UNION of a RIGHT and a LEFT join –  Mchl Jan 25 '11 at 17:39
8  
Actually the thing you wrote is not correct. Because when you do a UNION you will remove duplicates, and sometimes when you join two different tables there should be duplicates. –  Pavle Lekic Mar 19 '13 at 18:41
34  
This is the correct example: (SELECT ... FROM tbl1 LEFT JOIN tbl2 ...) UNION ALL (SELECT ... FROM tbl1 RIGHT JOIN tbl2 ... WHERE tbl1.col IS NULL) –  Pavle Lekic Mar 19 '13 at 18:45
1  
So the difference is that I am doing a left inclusive join and then right exclusive using UNION ALL –  Pavle Lekic Mar 19 '13 at 18:49
2  
and I see now that you say that yourself, sorry. Perhaps you could update your answer, given there is this case that it gets wrong and that the UNION ALL is always going to be more efficient? –  ysth Mar 31 '14 at 21:09

The answer that Pablo Santa Cruz gave is correct; however, in case anybody stumbled on this page and wants more clarification, here is a detailed breakdown.

Example Tables

Suppose we have the following tables:

-- t1
id  name
1   Tim
2   Marta

-- t2
id  name
1   Tim
3   Katarina

Inner Joins

An inner join, like this:

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
INNER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`;

Would get us only records that appear in both tables, like this:

1 Tim  1 Tim

Inner joins don't have a direction (like left or right) because they are explicitly bidirectional - we require a match on both sides.

Outer Joins

Outer joins, on the other hand, are for finding records that may not have a match in the other table. As such, you have to specify which side of the join is allowed to have a missing record.

LEFT JOIN and RIGHT JOIN are shorthand for LEFT OUTER JOIN and RIGHT OUTER JOIN; I will use their full names below to reinforce the concept of outer joins vs inner joins.

Left Outer Join

A left outer join, like this:

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
LEFT OUTER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`;

...would get us all the records from the left table regardless of whether or not they have a match in the right table, like this:

1 Tim   1    Tim
1 Marta NULL NULL

Right Outer Join

A right outer join, like this:

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
RIGHT OUTER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`;

...would get us all the records from the right table regardless of whether or not they have a match in the left table, like this:

1    Tim   1  Tim
NULL NULL  3  Katarina

Full Outer Join

A full outer join would give us all records from both tables, whether or not they have a match in the other table, with NULLs on both sides where there is no match. The result would look like this:

1    Tim   1    Tim
2    Marta NULL NULL
NULL NULL  3    Katarina

However, as Pablo Santa Cruz pointed out, MySQL doesn't support this. We can emulate it by doing a UNION of a left join and a right join, like this:

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
LEFT OUTER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`

UNION

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
RIGHT OUTER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`;

You can think of a UNION as meaning "run both of these queries, then stack the results on top of each other"; some of the rows will come from the first query and some from the second.

It should be noted that a UNION in MySQL will eliminate exact duplicates: Tim would appear in both of the queries here, but the result of the UNION only lists him once. My database guru colleague feels that this behavior should not be relied upon. So to be more explicit about it, we could add a WHERE clause to the second query:

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
LEFT OUTER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`

UNION

SELECT *
FROM `t1`
RIGHT OUTER JOIN `t2` ON `t1`.`id` = `t2`.`id`
WHERE `t1`.`id` IS NULL;

On the other hand, if you wanted to see duplicates for some reason, you could use UNION ALL.

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5  
This answer is more than a year old, but it turns out that Mr. Atwood had an even better answer on his blog in 2007: codinghorror.com/blog/2007/10/… –  Nathan Long May 27 '13 at 16:43
2  
For MySQL you really want to avoid using UNION instead of UNION ALL if there is no overlap (see Pavle's comment above). If you could add some more info to that effect in your answer here, I think it'd be the preferred answer for this question as it's more thorough. –  Garen Feb 11 '14 at 21:47
SELECT
    a.name,
    b.title
FROM
    author AS a
LEFT JOIN
    book AS b
    ON a.id = b.author_id
UNION
SELECT
    a.name,
    b.title
FROM
    author AS a
RIGHT JOIN
    book AS b
    ON a.id = b.author_id
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In sqlite you should do this:

select * 
from leftTable lt left join rightTable rt on lt.id = rt.lrid union
select lt.*,rl.*  -- To match column set
from rightTable rt left join  leftTable lt on lt.id = rt.lrid
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It is also possible, but you have to mention the same field names in select.

SELECT t1.name, t2.name FROM t1
LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
UNION
SELECT t1.name, t2.name FROM t2
LEFT JOIN t1 ON t1.id = t2.id
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protected by Community Aug 31 '14 at 16:18

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