Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have n arrays with which I need to determine if x is in all of the n arrays. (where n is any number, and x is a numeric value) I have something like the following in place, but it's always ending up false.

function filterArrays()
{
  var x = $(this).attr('id'); // ex: 2
  var arrays = [[1,2,3],[2,4,6]];
  var result = false;
  for each (var n in arrays)
  {
    result = result ^ (n.indexOf(x) > -1);
  }
}

How do I make result equal to true when x is in both arrays, but when x is not in both arrays, make result equal to false?

The function above will be used with jQuery's filter() method. Example:

$(arrayOfElementsWithNumericIds).filter(arrayFilter);
// arrayOfElementsWithNumericIds prototype: [div#1,div#2,div#3,...]

I'm thinking that a bitwise operation is called for, but I could be wrong. Please explain why your solution is right and why mine isn't working. (for bonus points)

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here are some issues with your example:

  • Comparing number to string (id is a string). Use x = parseInt(...)
  • Using the ^ operator. Instead initialize result to true and use &&.
  • Get rid of each. The correct syntax is for (key in object)

I've modified your code as little as possible:

function filterArrays()
{
    var x = parseInt($(this).attr('id')); // ex: 2
    var arrays = [[1,2,3],[2,4,6]];
    var result = true;
    for (var n in arrays)
    {
        result = result && (arrays[n].indexOf(x) > -1);
    }
    return result;
}

That being said, you can really optimize your code by using Array.every() and Array.some(). Also, using $(this).attr('id') creates a jQuery object unnecessarily since you can just say this.id directly.

function filterArrays()
{
    var x = parseInt(this.id); // ex: 2
    var arrays = [[1,2,3],[2,4,6]];
    var result = arrays.every(function(array)
    {
        return array.some(function(item)
        {
            return item === x;
        });
    });
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestions on how I could improve my code. While I would disagree on your use of the quantifier "lots" with regard to the errors in my example, I appreciate you pointing out the "few" you found and explaining how/why they could be improved. Your answer was the most thorough and therefore is the one I will accept. Thanks for your effort. –  sholsinger Jan 25 '11 at 19:55
    
@sholsinger: Thanks. I didn't mean anything by "lots"... You are right, "few" is more accurate. :-) –  gilly3 Jan 25 '11 at 20:15
    
My actual set-up is different. In my real code, arrays is an object, and therefore doesn't support every(). Is there a way that I can convert the object to an array without incurring too much overhead? –  sholsinger Jan 25 '11 at 20:18
1  
@sholsinger: You could, but it wouldn't buy you much, if anything at all. For iterating an object, using for ... in as you already have should be good enough. The only thing I'd add is a break statement in your loop if result is false. –  gilly3 Jan 25 '11 at 22:14

I think that you are looking for this:

  var result = true;
 for each (var n in arrays)
  {
    result = result && (n.indexOf(x) > -1);
  }

That is, assume that the value is in all the arrays to start. Then using the AND (&&) operator you get

  true AND (value is in current array)

if at any time the value is not in an array it becomes false and the entire operation will be false. Otherwise it remains true until the end of the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you probably already know, but your answer is correct and would fix the example code I provided. I appreciate the time you spent crafting your answer. –  sholsinger Jan 25 '11 at 19:58

xor's not the way to go. Look at it this way:

search for 2, start  result = false
1st array: 2 is present, result = false xor true = true
2nd array: 2 is present, result = true xor true = false
end: result is false (WRONG)

search for 4, start result = false
1st array: 4 is present, result = false xor true = true
2nd array: 4 is  absent, result = true xor false = true
end: result is true (WRONG)

You want a cummulative bit-wise and.

start: result = true, search for 2
1st array: 2 is present, result = true and true = true
2nd array: 2 is present, result = true and true = true
end: result is true (RIGHT)

start: result = true, search for 4
1st array: 4 is present, result = true and true = true
2nd array: 4 is absent, result = true and false = false
end: result if false (RIGHT)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion on changing from an XOR to AND. That is technically correct and would have fixed the problem. (mostly) Thanks for your efforts. –  sholsinger Jan 25 '11 at 19:57

Why Don't you extend the array prototype with a contains method? that way you can loop over each array and or/and the current result with the previous one.

share|improve this answer

You can loop over your 'arrays' object if you want, but, I think you just want a Set Intersect operation. This is one way to do it in jQuery, and it won't care about if the attr(id) value of x is an integer or string. I'm on lunch, i'll test this in a page quick...

function filterArrays(){
  var x = $(this).attr("id");
  var arrays = [[1,2,3],[2,4,6]];
  var result = ($.inArray(arrays[0], x )>0 && $.inArray(arrays[1], x) >0);
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@marc b I agree, cumulative bit-wise and operation. my post is an n^2 solution afaik. –  DefyGravity Jan 25 '11 at 18:04
    
See the two different Set implementations in my answer for pre-written code. –  Phrogz Jan 25 '11 at 18:31

Using http://phrogz.net/JS/ArraySetMath.js you could:

var sets  = [[1,2,3],[2,3,7],[1,7,2]];
var isect = sets[0];
for (var i=1,len=sets.length;i<len;++i){
  isect = isect.intersection( sets[i] );
}
console.log( isect );
// [2]

Or, using JS.Set you could:

var sets  = [[1,2,3],[2,3,7],[1,7,2]];

// Or JS.HashSet or JS.Set
var isect = new JS.SortedSet(sets[0]);
for (var i=1,len=sets.length;i<len;++i){
  isect = isect.intersection( new JS.SortedSet(sets[i]) );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I appreciate the effort you've put into making that library. That said, I don't want to add any additional overhead to my script at this time. –  sholsinger Jan 25 '11 at 20:00
    
@sholsinger Understood. –  Phrogz Jan 25 '11 at 21:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.