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User Control is located in Controls\TabControl. Contains a tabcontrol with 2 tabitems (RuleTab and DiagramTab).

In my MainWindowViewmodel class I have:

private void ShowSaveDialog()
    {
        System.Windows.Forms.SaveFileDialog sfd = new System.Windows.Forms.SaveFileDialog();
        sfd.Filter = "Text File (*.txt)|*.txt";

        bool? saveResult = sfd.ShowDialog() == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK;

        if (saveResult == true)
        {
            string s = sfd.FileName;
            filePath = s;
            SaveFile(s);
            SetTitle(sfd.FileName);
            RuleTab.Header = new System.IO.FileInfo(sfd.FileName).Name;
            RuleTab.Focus();
        }

RuleTab (tabitem) isn't being found because it's in a User Control. How do I reference it properly in my class?

TabControl.xaml

         x:Name="TabEditor" x:FieldModifier="public" mc:Ignorable="d" d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="423">

<TabControl x:Name="tabControl" x:FieldModifier="public" Width="Auto" Padding="0" Margin="3" DataContext="{Binding}">
    <local:CloseableTabItem Header="Diagram" x:Name="DiagramTab" x:FieldModifier="public" Height="25">
        <Image Height="Auto" x:Name="ResultImage" x:FieldModifier="public" Stretch="Fill" Width="Auto" />
    </local:CloseableTabItem>
    <local:CloseableTabItem Header="Rulebase" x:Name="RuleTab" x:FieldModifier="public" Height="25" >
        <Grid>
            <TextBox Height="Auto" x:Name="RuleText" x:FieldModifier="public" Width="Auto" Text="" AcceptsTab="True" AcceptsReturn="True" VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" HorizontalScrollBarVisibility="Visible" />
        </Grid>
    </local:CloseableTabItem>
</TabControl>

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3 Answers 3

There are various possibilities but if I look at your code-example then I think that I would add an event FileSaved to your ViewModel and raise this event after sucessfull saving.
From your MainWindow you can register to this event and do further processing such as focus the desired control.
For setting the header however, I would declare a property in your ViewModel and bind the RuleTabs header to it. But clearly you also can set the header in the event, but this has some unnecessary drawbacks.

Update
As desired here a short example for implementing the event and the property in your ViewModel. I assume that your ViewModel implements INotifyPropertyChanged. If not but it derives from DependencyObject, declare a read only DepencencyProperty for FileName instead of the clr-property:

string m_fileName;
public event EventHandler FileSaved;    

private void ShowSaveDialog() 
    { 
        System.Windows.Forms.SaveFileDialog sfd = 
            new System.Windows.Forms.SaveFileDialog(); 
        sfd.Filter = "Text File (*.txt)|*.txt"; 

        bool? saveResult = sfd.ShowDialog() == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK; 

        if (saveResult == true) 
        { 
            string s = sfd.FileName; 
            filePath = s; 
            SaveFile(s); 
            FileName=sfd.FileName;
            OnFileSaved(EventArgs.Empty);
        } 
}

protected virtual void OnFileSaved(EventArgs e){
   if(null != FileSaved){
       FileSaved(this,e);
   }
}

public string FileName{
    get{return m_fileName;}
    private set{
       if(value!=m_fileName){
           m_fileName=value;
           OnPropertyChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs("FileName"));
       }
    }
} 
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Can you possibly give me a code sample for both? This is my first attempt at using this model :0 –  mr justinator Jan 25 '11 at 19:13

WPF declares controls in a UserControl as private. To make your RuleTab public you declare it with a FieldModifier as in:

<TextBox x:FieldModifier="Public" />

where x is the xaml namespace xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml".

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ahh its lowercase "public"...thanks :) –  mr justinator Jan 25 '11 at 20:10
    
After setting the x:FieldModifier to public I still am unable to access it properly in my MainWindowViewModel class (RuleTab.Header = new System.IO.FileInfo(ofd.FileName).Name;....any suggestions perhaps? –  mr justinator Jan 25 '11 at 20:40
    
@mr justinator: This is not (properly) possible as long as you don't have a reference to the MainWindow and I would not recommend you to give this reference directly to the ViewModel. You will loose a lot of flexiblity of the MVVM-pattern. This is why I recommended you to make the event and the FileName property. From the main-window you can access then your user-control and if you desire you can give direct focus to the textbox (such as TomBot wrote). However I would only focus the usercontrol and look that the usercontrol forwards the focus to the TextBox. (A lot of questions for one post:) –  Chris Valentine Jan 25 '11 at 21:54

You're using the MVVM pattern, are you not? Don't access properties of your control, access properties of the view model that the control is bound to.

You should have a view model for the RuleTab; it needs to expose a Filename property that the Header in the RuleTab is bound to. Your method then just sets that property. (Which, of course, must implement change notification in one of the usual ways.)

Generally speaking, any time you try to manipulate a control in view model code you are Doing It Wrong. View models don't know that controls exist. It's pretty unlikely that you write unit tests for your view models in NUnit (it's one of those things that everybody talks about but few people do), but you should at least be able to.

Also, the method that shows the file dialog should really be a method in the view, not the view model. This gets a little architecture-astronauty, but the general idea is that the view model doesn't have any UI at all. A common way to deal with this is to have the view model implement a SaveCommand that raises an event when it's executed, and a public method that actually saves the file. The view listens to the event, and when it's raised, it displays the dialog, gets the filename, and calls the method on the view model if the user didn't cancel. This, again, gives you something that you can write unit tests for without involving the UI.

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I'm trying to use the MVVM model yes :) I just am finding it very difficult to grasp obviously! I built this app and then am tryign to rebuild it using this model but it seems much more difficult. I'll try to find more code samples. Thanks for taking the time to respond. –  mr justinator Jan 26 '11 at 18:46
    
MVVM is much simpler than it seems. There are a lot of little sub-patterns in it that you have to get used to - like, implementing a SelectedItem property when your view model is bound to a ListBox, and binding ListBox.SelectedItem to it - but once you get your head around them it becomes something you could do in your sleep. I'm modifying on a WinForms app that I wrote a year ago and the insane complexity of code in what's really a very simple UI makes me weep. It would be so much simpler if I could just implement a view model and bind to it. –  Robert Rossney Jan 26 '11 at 19:03

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