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I am trying to keep my service layer free of asp.net mvc dependcies but I have ran into a problem. I want to use Compare but that is part of the asp.net mvc library. So what should I do?

I have a domain class(that is later used with fluent nhibernate)

public class User()
{
   [Required(ErrorMessage = "Required")]
   [Compare()] // can't do this because not my User domain needs to know about mvc and I   rather it not
   public virtual string Email (get; set;}
   public virtual string ConfirmEmail (get; set;} // not mapped with fluent nhibernate
}

public class UserViewModel()
{
   public User User {get; set;}
}


public ActionMethod method()
{
  if(!this.ModelState.isValid)
  {

   }
}

I have this domain object made so I would find it kinda pointless to move all those properties into the UsersViewAModel just to put the validation on them then later on through all those back into the domain model that will be used to commit(nhibernate commit)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should probably use a "buddy class" for your model class to hold the validation attributes:

// Note the partial keyword below:  the full definition of MyModel 
// can be put in a file in the model
[MetadataType(typeof(MyModelMetadata))]
public partial class MyModel {}

public class MyModelMetadata
{
    //properties with validation attributes (dataannotations)  go here...
}

The validation attributes are one item that does not cleanly split between the MVC concerns: They relate as much to client validation in the views as they do to server validation in the domain, at the point where the data is stored to the database and therefore needs validation.

So @jfar, by saying that they should go in the ViewModel, is as wrong as the person who says they should be in the domain.

In fact, IMHO, it is totally incorrect to put the validation attributes in the ViewModel. The ViewModel should be a container for the data that is sent to the View. It should not port any logic of its own. That logic, in this case Validation Attributes, should be defined outside of the ViewModel and the buddy class is the best option for that, especially if you are using an automated ORM, but not only in that special case.

This question is an illustration of the fact that not every issue maps neatly to MVC, so getting all Stalinistic about where the Validation Attributes should go is plain wrong.

My advice: put them in one place, separate from all other concerns. The way to do that is to use buddy classes.

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Putting validation attributes on your domain models is the worse thing you can do if you are trying to separate concerns.

Put validation attributes on ViewModels.

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@jfar - You lost me. How do you put the validation attributes on the viewModels if I am using the domain class in the view model? –  chobo2 Jan 25 '11 at 21:21
    
Make another view model. There is no point of having view models if you put domain classes in them. –  jfar Jan 25 '11 at 21:49
    
@jfar - hmm I thought the whole point of viewmodels was so your not using you domain/model directly. –  chobo2 Jan 25 '11 at 21:58
    
@chobo2, that is the point. Thats why you create a separate class for your view that consists of the necessary properties from your User in your domain model. Then you stick your validation attributes on the new view model class. –  Brian Cauthon Jan 25 '11 at 22:10
1  
@Brian. How about if I am taking a list of stuff. Like say in my example I take in a List of Users. In my ViewModel I would have List<Users> Users {get; set;} now how would that work if I only had the properties of what I needed of the Users in my ViewModel? –  chobo2 Jan 26 '11 at 2:53
public class User()
    {
       public virtual string Email (get; set;}
       public virtual string ConfirmEmail (get; set;} // not mapped with fluent nhibernate
    }
public class UserModel()
{
   [Required(ErrorMessage = "Required")]
   [Compare()] // can't do this because not my User domain needs to know about mvc and I   rather it not
   public virtual string Email (get; set;}
   public virtual string ConfirmEmail (get; set;} // not mapped with fluent nhibernate
}

public class UserViewModel()
{
   public UserModel User {get; set;}
}


public ActionMethod method()
{
  if(!this.ModelState.isValid)
  {

   }
}

You might want to use AutoMapper to solve the problem of populating UserModel from User and vice versa.

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Ok I will check that out. Is your example using auto mapper since it seems like your repeating yourself in the UserModel. If I used auto mapper where would I put the .dll in my service project or in my mvc project or both? –  chobo2 Jan 25 '11 at 22:10
    
There are a hell of a lot of syntax errors in your code. :) –  RPM1984 Jan 26 '11 at 6:10
    
@RPM1984 - just copied original code. –  Jakub Konecki Jan 26 '11 at 14:36
    
@chobo2 - User goes to the library that's shared by service and mvc (as it's returned from service and used by controller), UserModel is in mvc project (it's view only). In most cases both classes will be similar, but UserModel may have a few more properties that are view-related. –  Jakub Konecki Jan 26 '11 at 14:39

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