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I am writing a class library for Mac OS X and iOS to be released as a Cocoa Framework for OS X and a Static Library for iOS. To simplify matters, I intend to use multiple targets in Xcode. However, the classes on Mac OS X link against Cocoa.h whereas on iOS they link against Foundation.h.

My questions basically are:

  • Could the Mac OS X framework link against Foundation.framework instead? Classes used within the framework are NSString, NSMutableString, and NSMutableArray.
  • Or could I use preprocessor directives within the header files to control framework inclusion, e.g.

    #ifdef MacOSX
        #import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>
    #else
        #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
    #endif
    
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Take a look at this stackoverflow.com/questions/3181321/…. –  detunized Jan 25 '11 at 20:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use these to separate platform dependent code (see TargetConditionals.h):

#ifdef TARGET_OS_IPHONE 
    // iOS
#elif defined TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
    // iOS Simulator
#elif defined TARGET_OS_MAC
    // Other kinds of Mac OS
#else
    // Unsupported platform
#endif

Here's a useful chart.

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2  
I did a bit of testing and corrected the code accordingly. Apparently TARGET_OS_MAC is defined for iOS as well. Best is really to look into TargetConditionals.h and see which macros suit your needs. There's quite a few of them. –  detunized Jan 25 '11 at 20:55
    
I believe now you need to use #if TARGET_OS_IPHONE, instead of #ifdef. –  Vincent Tourraine Oct 7 '13 at 7:52
1  
This answer is wrong. There's a couple problems: First, TARGET_OS_IPHONE will always be defined. It's defined as 0 sometimes, but it's still defined. Same with TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR. But, also, TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR will never be 1 unless TARGET_OS_IPHONE is also 1. If you need to check for the iOS simulator specifically, you should do that check first, like: #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR / #elif TARGET_OS_IPHONE / #elif TARGET_OS_MAC / #endif. –  Steven Fisher Dec 6 '13 at 20:20

It works like a charm:

#ifdef __APPLE__
  #include "TargetConditionals.h"

  #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR  
  // ios simulator

  #elif TARGET_OS_IPHONE
  // ios device

  #elif TARGET_OS_MAC
  // mac os 

  #else
  // Unsupported platform
  #endif
#endif
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I think this is the only answer here that will actually work. –  Steven Fisher Dec 6 '13 at 20:25
  • Could the Mac OS X framework link against Foundation.framework instead? Classes used within the framework are NSString, NSMutableString, and NSMutableArray.

Try it and see. If the compile fails, no. If it succeeds, yes.

  • Or could I use preprocessor directives within the header files to control framework inclusion, e.g.

Yes, you can. In fact, I believe that is the only way to do that.

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Thank you. Thinking about it, Foundation is a framework, therefore I suppose there shouldn't be an issue. I'll give it a go and see! –  BWHazel Jan 25 '11 at 22:22
    
Come to think of it, Core Plot does exactly what you want to do. If you have issues, check it out and see what they do. –  CajunLuke Jan 25 '11 at 23:00

This works perfectly for me:

#ifdef __IPHONE_OS_VERSION_MAX_ALLOWED
//iOS 
#else
//Mac
#endif
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