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I made the following (insane) code in C:

long i = 0;

main() {
    recurse();
}

recurse() {
    i++;
    recurse();
}

When compiled with gcc -O2, the compiler recognizes the infinite recursion and turns it into an infinite loop; it does this so well, in fact, that it actually loops in the main() without calling the recurse() function. This produced a bit of opcode / assembly that I don't quite get, though:

00000000004004d0 <main>:
  4004d0:       eb fe                   jmp    4004d0 <main>
  4004d2:       66 66 66 66 66 2e 0f    nopw   %cs:0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
  4004d9:       1f 84 00 00 00 00 00

There is some discussion about "nopw" at http://john.freml.in/amd64-nopl. Can anybody explain the meaning of 4004d2-4004e0? From looking at the opcode list, it seems that 66 .. codes are multi-byte expansions. I feel I could probably get a better answer to this here than I would unless I tried to grok the opcode list for a few hours.

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Are we just looking at random junk padding here? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 25 '11 at 20:19
1  
Maybe! I don't really know! That's the beauty of it all! WHEEE. Really, though, I get from the linked that the processor WOULD be loading a block as one instruction for speed optimization, though thanks to the jmp, it doesn't. I just get the meaning of it. I know what 0x90 is, but I don't know what's going on with 66 .. .., or why it is 72 bits long. –  Jeff Ferland Jan 25 '11 at 20:41
1  
It's not the reason here, but you may find My, what strange NOPs you have! - The Old New Thing an interesting read. –  ephemient Jan 25 '11 at 21:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The 0x66 bytes are an "Operand-Size Override" prefix. Having more than one of these is equivalent to having one.

The 0x2e is a 'null prefix' in 64-bit mode (it's a CS: segment override otherwise - which is why it shows up in the assembly mnemonic).

0x0f 0x1f is a 2 byte opcode for a NOP that takes a ModRM byte

0x84 is the ModRM byte

And to be honest, I'm not sure exactly how the ModRM byte modifies the 2 byte NOP.

Essentially, those bytes are one long NOP instruction that will never get executed anyway. It's in there to ensure that the next function is aligned on a 16-byte boundary, I'd assume. And the blog article the question linked to (http://john.freml.in/amd64-nopl) explains why the compiler uses a complicated single NOP instruction instead of a bunch of single-byte 0x90 NOP instructions.

You can find the details on the instruction encoding in AMD's tech ref documents:

Mainly in the "AMD64 Architecture Programmer's Manual Volume 3: General Purpose and System Instructions". I'm sure Intel's technical references for the x64 architecture will have the same information (and might even be more understandable).

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Re the ModRM byte meaning... ref.x86asm.net/coder64.html#x0F1F lists the ModRM byte as being used for Hintable NOPs, with references to this: 1. See U.S. Patent 5,701,442 2. sandpile.org -- IA-32 architecture -- opcode groups. I have not checked those, but in case you care. –  Bahbar Jan 26 '11 at 8:21

The alignment is usually done with a single nop instruction (or xchg ax,ax). See this ridiculous loop for instance:

mov  eax, 3
mov  ecx, something
nop
nop
nop
label:
inc  eax
call somewhere
loop label

This might make sense for a compiler. However such alignments in very high numbers cause multiple NOP cycles to be consumed. Instead, if you could just align the loop with a single instruction, you'd get less performance penalty from alignment, see this variant:

mov  eax, 3
mov  ecx, something
nop3 ;; nop opcode taking 3 bytes only and consumes single cycle
label:
inc  eax
call somewhere
loop label

This becomes especially important when number of required nops increase.

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I would guess this is just the branch-delay instruction.

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The assembler (not the compiler) pads code up to the next alignment boundary with the longest NOP instruction it can find that fits. This is what you're seeing.

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I belive that the nopw is junk - i is never read in your program, and there are thus no need to increment it.

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i gave me a convenient way to check the stack size when it failed. Gdb, as far as my limited knowledge goes, doesn't have a "print size of stack" key. It is further interesting to watch the compiler remove the incrementing of it once the optimization level is ratcheted up. The program is intentionally "insane." –  Jeff Ferland Jan 25 '11 at 21:44
    
My point was that the compiler optimized it away - since you never read i. –  Arne Bergene Fossaa Jan 26 '11 at 0:05
    
The question isn't about that, though. The point of the question is why the nop (nopw here) come out that way. The standard nop is 0x90 and just repeated. Putting i in there as an unused variable was purposeful and externally useful even if it is not touched in the code. –  Jeff Ferland Jan 26 '11 at 14:18

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