Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a C++ class that can do decimal floating point arithmetic. Looking through http://speleotrove.com/decimal/ there are links to all sorts of classes that people have written and not maintained. Digging through the decNumber++ stuff led me to some emails showing that GCC will eventually support this functionality. (Formally known as ISO/IEC TR 24733)

I'm looking for something I can use as a drop-in replacement for float or double, something that other people are using in their own projects. Hopefully open source.

Thanks!

EDIT: I should point out that I'm trying to use this to represent prices. So I need EXACT decimals, not HUGE decimals.

share|improve this question
    
gmplib maybe? gmplib.org –  Anycorn Jan 25 '11 at 21:05
    
you shouldn't use doubles or floats for prices... –  JH. Jan 26 '11 at 6:45
4  
JH I know this, that's why I'm looking for something like BigDecimal. –  poindexter Jan 26 '11 at 16:02
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There exists a huge library called GMP (GNU multiple precision library) which supports this and also has C++ bindings, though to be honest the C++ interface is a bit wonky and outdated.

An example from the documentation, the following creates a float called f with at least 500 bits of precision:

mpf_class f(1.5, 500);
share|improve this answer
2  
Similar to BigDecimal mpf_class takes a string constructor. The version of gmpxx that ships with Ubuntu 10.4 uses partial template specialization, so it might be a stretch to call it outdated. I think I can get this to do my bidding. Congratulations, you get a cookie, erhm checkmark. –  poindexter Jan 26 '11 at 16:01
    
@poindexter: what I meant with “outdated” is primarily the naming: come on, what kind of class name is “mpf_class”?! They should have called it gmp::big_float or something like that. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 26 '11 at 16:14
    
I think that's an uphill battle with GNU naming conventions. :) –  poindexter Jan 26 '11 at 20:37
add comment

Take your pick. There are a bunch of them out there:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbitrary-precision_arithmetic#Libraries

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you need to do operations with HUGE decimal values I would suggest you to use http://gmplib.org/ library. I've used it a lot with C and C++.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use GMP and store everything as cents. If you know that you won't pass 2^32 cents (42.949673 million dollars) use a 32 bit unsigned int (or use a 64 bit unsigned int) and keep it simple.

share|improve this answer
    
JH, this isn't a good idea. Skim down to the section "Financial Computing" for some examples of how this can fail. introcs.cs.princeton.edu/91float –  poindexter Jan 26 '11 at 16:04
    
Its probably a bad idea if u need those specific calculations and don't understand what you are doing, otherwise to represent "prices" floats/doubles seem overrated and incorrect. –  JH. Jan 31 '11 at 19:37
    
+1: Actually this answer makes more sense to me than most others, which suggest GMP or MAPM. Those arbitrary precision libraries use base 2, which means a value such as 0.1 can never be represented exactly, whatever precision you may set. Storing everything as cents, in other words multiplying everything by 100 and using int64_t seems like a perfectly acceptable solution to me. At least all additions will be exact. –  Sam Hocevar Oct 20 '11 at 23:27
    
Correction to my last comment: MAPM does use decimal digits internally, so it will be able to represent 0.1 exactly. –  Sam Hocevar Oct 21 '11 at 0:08
add comment

Probably "MAPM, A Portable Arbitrary Precision Math Library in C" is what you are looking for. It also includes C++ Wrappers:

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~ringx004/mapm-main.html

share|improve this answer
    
FAIL: "Note that the default MAPM library is NOT thread safe. MAPM internal data structures could get corrupted if multiple MAPM functions are active at the same time. The user should guarantee that only one thread is performing MAPM functions. This can usually be achieved by a call to the operating system to obtain a 'semaphore' or 'critical code section' so the operating system will guarantee that only one MAPM thread will be active at a time. " –  poindexter Jan 25 '11 at 23:28
add comment

I may be too late for this but would 128bit decimals work? These have been accepted into C++ and at least gcc has them since gcc-4.5 (we're starting 4.9 now:

#include <iostream>
#include <decimal/decimal>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  {
    std::decimal::decimal32 dn(.3), dn2(.099), dn3(1000), dn4(201);
    dn-=dn2;
    dn*=dn3;
    cout << "decimal32 = "  << (dn==dn4) << " : " << decimal32_to_double(dn) << endl;
  }

  {
    std::decimal::decimal64 dn(.3), dn2(.099), dn3(1000), dn4(201);
    dn-=dn2;
    dn*=dn3;
    cout << "decimal64 = "  << (dn==dn4) << " : " << decimal64_to_double(dn) << endl;
  }

  {
    std::decimal::decimal128 dn(.3), dn2(.099), dn3(1000), dn4(201);
    dn-=dn2;
    dn*=dn3;
    cout << "decimal128 = " << (dn==dn4) << " : " << decimal128_to_double(dn) << endl;
  }

  return 0;
}

Note there is decimal32 equal in size to float, decimal64 equal in size to most double. So decimal128 is pretty big. From Wikipedia: Decimal128 supports 34 decimal digits of significand and an exponent range of −6143 to +6144, i.e. ±0.000000000000000000000000000000000×10−6143 to ±9.999999999999999999999999999999999×106144. (Equivalently, ±0000000000000000000000000000000000×10−6176 to ±9999999999999999999999999999999999×106111.)

The mpfr library is arbitrary precision binary floating point - not arbitrary precision decimal. There is a difference.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.