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I've tried to temporarily redirect System.out to /dev/null using the following code but it doesn't work.

System.out.println("this should go to stdout");

PrintStream original = System.out;
System.setOut(new PrintStream(new FileOutputStream("/dev/null")));
System.out.println("this should go to /dev/null");

System.setOut(original);
System.out.println("this should go to stdout"); // This is not getting printed!!!

Anyone have any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
I see both lines fine on my system. I'm using Java 6 update 22. – Peter Lawrey Jan 25 '11 at 21:29
2  
BTW: Beware of manipulating System.out like this without broader synchronization to prevent concurrent interactions by multiple threads. – Lawrence Dol Jan 25 '11 at 21:50

Man, this is not so good, because Java is cross-platform and '/dev/null' is Unix specific (apparently there is an alternative on Windows, read the comments). So your best option is to create a custom OutputStream to disable output.

try {
    System.out.println("this should go to stdout");

    PrintStream original = System.out;
    System.setOut(new PrintStream(new OutputStream() {
                public void write(int b) {
                    //DO NOTHING
                }
            }));
    System.out.println("this should go to /dev/null, but it doesn't because it's not supported on other platforms");

    System.setOut(original);
    System.out.println("this should go to stdout");
}
catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
There is in alternative on windows, the NUL device; IIRC it's "NUL:" as a "filename". – Lawrence Dol Jan 25 '11 at 21:46
    
oh wow, this is really first time i hear about it! Gonna edit the post. Thank you! – Elijah Saounkine Jan 25 '11 at 21:46
2  
But +1, because this is the right platform-independent answer. I would, however, also override write(byte[],int,int), for efficiency. – Lawrence Dol Jan 25 '11 at 21:47
2  
I will point out that in most cases you should probably restore the original OutputStream in a finally block. – javacoder Mar 7 '13 at 20:50
1  
There is new NullOutputStream in Apache Commons IO. – volkovs Oct 23 '14 at 6:18

You can use the class NullPrintStream below as:

PrintStream original = System.out;
System.setOut(new NullPrintStream());
System.out.println("Message not shown.");
System.setOut(original);

And the class NullPrintStream is...

import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.io.PrintStream;

public class NullPrintStream extends PrintStream {

  public NullPrintStream() {
    super(new NullByteArrayOutputStream());
  }

  private static class NullByteArrayOutputStream extends ByteArrayOutputStream {

    @Override
    public void write(int b) {
      // do nothing
    }

    @Override
    public void write(byte[] b, int off, int len) {
      // do nothing
    }

    @Override
    public void writeTo(OutputStream out) throws IOException {
      // do nothing
    }

  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Where can I get the NullPrintStream? Which library? Or do I need to create the class myself? – Daniil Shevelev Nov 7 '13 at 15:14
    
I really needed this for my code... It is definitely a bit of a life saver for silencing stdout. – Isiah Meadows Jan 17 '14 at 1:59

Old question, I know, but would this small line do the trick on Windows?

System.setOut(new PrintStream(new File("NUL")));

Much less code and looks pretty direct to me.

share|improve this answer

I think System.setOut(null); should work too. At least it worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Any subsequent calls to System.out.anything will cause a NullPointerException to be thrown. If that worked for you, then you must be catching the exception somewhere. – John Snyder Oct 19 '15 at 17:43

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