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if i specify like

.a ul{}
.a ul li{}

and

.b ul{}
.b ul li{}

Will the properties of ul in .b be totally separated from properties of ul of .a? or they will be common?

I want that the the styles of ul stays totally separated from style of ul in .b without using div id. thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As long as you ensure in your HTML that you don't have class="a" elements inside class="b" elements or vice versa, your selectors will apply to separate <ul>.

They will only be common for <ul>s in both .a and .b if:

  • You group the selectors, like this:

    .a ul, .b ul {}
    .a ul li, .b ul li {}
    
  • You declare the exact same style rules for both selectors

  • In your HTML, <ul> is contained within elements of both classes (whether it's class="a b" or .a inside .b or .b inside .a), for example:

    <div class="a b">
        <ul><li>Item</li></ul>
    </div>
    
    <div class="b">
        <div class="a">
            <ul><li>Item</li></ul>
        </div>
    </div>
    
    <div class="a">
        <div class="b">
            <ul><li>Item</li></ul>
        </div>
    </div>
    

    Note that this only fully applies if the second bullet is also true; you may not get the results you expect due to the effects of the cascade.

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Thanks for such a wonderful explanation. –  Lucka Jan 25 '11 at 21:50
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If the parent has only one of the two classes, .a or .b, they will be complete different. But if the parent has both classes then depends on the css hierarchy.

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it also depends if something with one class is nested inside the other. –  Endophage Jan 25 '11 at 21:38
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Any uls within an element with the class="a" will get the .a styles. Any within class="b" will get the b style.

If b is nested within a, then both a and b styles will occur except where the same property is set in both a and b - in which case b will take precedence. e.g.

<div class="a">
<div class="b">
<ul>
<li>...</li> etc

If you define class="a b" on the container, as clarified by Boltclock, any styles defined as .a.b ul will be most specific and override the same properties defined in .a or .b. If the shared properties only exist in .a and .b then whichever is declared later in the stylesheet takes precedence

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not 100% correct but close, the more deeply nested class will only take preference on shared properties. If you apply multiple classes they are applied in order, left to right. –  Endophage Jan 25 '11 at 21:37
    
good point - will clarify –  Kris C Jan 25 '11 at 21:39
1  
For elements with multiple classes, .a.b ul will be more specific than .a ul and .b ul separately; if you only have the latter two then whichever is declared later in the stylesheet takes precedence. –  BoltClock Jan 25 '11 at 21:45
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