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I have a multi-dimensional array similar to the example below that I want to group together using Ruby's zip method. I have it working fine when each inner array has the same number of elements, but am running into problems when they are different lengths.

In the example below, the second set is missing a record at 00:15. How would I fill in this missing record?

What am I considering a gap?

It's the timestamp that constitutes a gap. Take a look at my first code sample where I have a comment about the gap being at 00:15. All the other arrays have a hash with this timestamp, so I consider this to be a "missing record" or "gap". The timestamp really could be some other unique string so the fact that they are 15 minutes apart is irrelevant. The values are also irrelevant.

The only approach that comes to mind involves looping over the arrays twice. The first time would be to build an array of uniq timestamps, and the second time would be to fill in the missing record(s) where the timestamp are not present. I'm comfortable coding this approach, but it seems a little hacky and Ruby always seems to surprise me with an elegant and concise solution.

I start with this:

values = [
  [
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => 2},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
  ],
  [ # There's a gap here at 00:15
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
  ],
  [
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => 2},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
  ]
]

I want to end with this:

values = [
  [
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => 2},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
  ],
  [ # The gap has been filled with a nil value
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => nil},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
  ],
  [
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => 2},
    {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
  ]
]

When all the arrays are the same size, values.transpose will produce:

[
  [
   {:value=>1, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:00"}, 
   {:value=>1, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:00"}, 
   {:value=>1, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:00"}
  ], 
  [
    {:value=>2, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:15"}, 
    {:value=>nil, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:15"},
    {:value=>2, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:15"}
  ], 
  [
    {:value=>3, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:30"}, 
    {:value=>3, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:30"}, 
    {:value=>3, :timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:30"}
  ]
]
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Define more clearly what constitutes a "gap". Is it doing some inspection of the timestamp times to determine this? The values? Something else? –  Ben Lee Jan 25 '11 at 22:23
    
Good question Ben. I updated my question with an explanation about what constitutes a gap. Hopefully this helps. –  Beerlington Jan 25 '11 at 22:32
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The approach you outlined is correct, but it turns out ruby is very well suited for doing that kind of approach elegantly. This would do it, for example:

stamps = values.map{ |logs| logs.map{ |row| row[:timestamp] } }.flatten.uniq.sort
values.map!{ |logs| stamps.map { |ts| logs.select{ |row| row[:timestamp] == ts }.first || { :timestamp => ts, :value => nil } } }

The first line gets a list of unique timestamps (maps all the logs into just arrays of timestamps, flattens the arrays into a single array, keeps only uniques, and sorts the timestamps).

The second line fills in the gaps (loops through the logs, and for each timestamp in that log use what's there if there's something there, otherwise insert the new nil-valued row).

share|improve this answer
    
Nice and short (if long line lengths); the usage of select seems dangerous to performance, however, using O(n^2) in the worst case. –  Phrogz Jan 25 '11 at 23:45
    
@Phrogz, yeah it's painfully bad in terms of computational efficiency, but unless your values array has several million lines, or you are using a computer built before 1995, the actual computational speed will still be only a few milliseconds. Something I learned long ago about ruby is to not try to save processor cycles unless you really do have a reason to -- don't look for bottlenecks before they exist. The latency from a single database access vastly outweighs thousands of processor cycles on modern computers. And the latency from a single network access outweighs millions. –  Ben Lee Jan 26 '11 at 5:53
    
Performance is definitely a consideration so I benchmarked the answers you guys provided. I was expecting @Phrogz's code to be more efficient based on your comments, but it's just the opposite. @Ben's code consistently runs 2x faster. I'm using Ruby 1.8.7 on OS X. Here's my benchmark code, maybe I'm missing something? gist.github.com/03ea4920421986700257 –  Beerlington Jan 26 '11 at 13:21
    
@Beerlington, Phrogz hadn't posted his answer last I looked at this, so I only just now saw it. Looks like his solution instantiates many more ruby objects, and on top of that, the flatten on the entire outside array creates a very large ruby object (relative to the sizes of all the other objects we are working with). It also uses a computational expensive operation every time through the loop (array subtraction is non-trivial). My code is computationally bad, but his is computationally worse. –  Ben Lee Jan 30 '11 at 5:48
    
If you really want to speed up this operation, I'd recommend changing the data structure of the original values input, if that's a possibility. –  Ben Lee Jan 30 '11 at 5:52
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Here's a working solution; it finds all timestamps, finds the missing timestamps in each set, and then injects them. See comments after the solution for a small improvement you could make with Ruby 1.9.2:

values = [[
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => 2},
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
],[
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
],[
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:00", :value => 1},
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:15", :value => 2},
  {:timestamp => "2011-01-01 00:30", :value => 3}
]]

all_stamps = values.flatten.map{|x| x[:timestamp]}.uniq.sort
values.each do |set|
  my_stamps = set.map{ |x| x[:timestamp] }.uniq
  missing   = all_stamps - my_stamps
  set.concat( missing.map{ |stamp| {timestamp:stamp, value:nil} } )
  set.replace( set.sort_by{ |x| x[:timestamp] } )
end

require 'pp'
pp values
#=> [[{:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:00", :value=>1},
#=>   {:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:15", :value=>2},
#=>   {:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:30", :value=>3}],
#=>  [{:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:00", :value=>1},
#=>   {:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:15", :value=>nil},
#=>   {:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:30", :value=>3}],
#=>  [{:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:00", :value=>1},
#=>   {:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:15", :value=>2},
#=>   {:timestamp=>"2011-01-01 00:30", :value=>3}]]

With Ruby 1.9.2 you can replace set.replace( set.sort_by{...} ) with simply set.sort_by!{ ... }. Note also that I've assumed you're using Ruby 1.9 in my hash literal (seen in missing.map...).

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Also checkout Array#in_groups_of if you're using Rails

%w(1 2 3 4 5 6 7).in_groups_of(3) {|g| p g}
["1", "2", "3"]
["4", "5", "6"]
["7", nil, nil]

http://weblog.rubyonrails.org/2006/3/1/new-in-rails-enumerable-group_by-and-array-in_groups_of

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