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I have a ProgressDialog that I couldn't get to display for love nor money. A bit of research suggested I needed to put it in a thread.

So example

public void Update(final int ScheduleId, final Context context) {
    final Handler progressHandler = new Handler() {
        public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
            x.dismiss();
        }
    };        

        x = ProgressDialog.show(context, "Scheduling...", "Calculating and Storing Dates", true, false);        
    new Thread() {
        public void run() {
            // Do Nothing
            boolean bResult = UpdateHistory(ScheduleId, context);
            Log.i("HERE","Finished Here?");
            if (bResult) {  
                progressHandler.sendEmptyMessage(0);
            }
        }
    }.start();
}

But all that seems to happen for me, is that the spinner just disappears off the screen and the activity finishes, while UpdateHistory continues to run in the background.

If I move the call to UpdateHistory below the .start() (outside of the thread), I don't get a progress spinner displayed at all.

What exactly is it that Im missing?

All this code is in an Activity.

What can you recommend, most websites appear to talk about threads and I've tried doing them every which way you can, and as I say, I either get the the thread run in the background and the spinner displayed for a second, or I get no spinner at all while the function runs in the foreground.

Thanks Simon

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2  
try using an Async task, it should be perfect for this. –  Jems Jan 25 '11 at 23:03

1 Answer 1

The preferred way is with an AsyncTask, but you should also be able to do it with a Thread, something like this:

public class MyActivity extends Activity {
    ...
    private static final HANDLER_MESSAGE_SUCCESS = 0;
    private ProgressDialog x;
    ...
    private Handler handler = new Handler(){
        @Override
        public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
            switch(msg.what){
            case HANDLER_MESSAGE_SUCCESS:
                x.dismiss();
            default:
                Log.w("Handler","handleMessage / Message type not recognised / msg.what = "+String.valueOf(msg.what));
            }
        }
    };
    private void backgroundProcess(){
        x = ProgressDialog.show(MyActivity.this, "Scheduling...", "Calculating and Storing Dates", true, false);
        Thread backgroundThread = new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                boolean bResult = UpdateHistory(ScheduleId, MyActivity.this);
                Log.i("HERE","Finished Here?");
                if (bResult) {  
                    Message msg = Message.obtain();
                    msg.what = HANDLER_MESSAGE_SUCCESS;
                    handler.sendMessage(msg);
                }
            }
        };
        backgroundThread.start();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggesting. I was hoping maybe I missed out the @Override - that would have been stupid. But no, even with this, same thing. I get a dialog for a second, then it disappears and the UpdateHistory function runs in the background but eventually comes back and then does the Log.i underneath. The threads obviously running in the background (I hate threading - give me VB6 anyday). I do get this though: "E/WindowManager( 444): Activity com.whatever.whatever has leaked window com.android.internal.policy.impl.PhoneWindow$DecorView@43f38b88 that was originally added here" –  Simon Jan 25 '11 at 23:25
    
I'll have a look into the Async task. But can anyone explain why this doesn't work when all the websites out there seem to suggest it should? Im really trying to learn why we would choose between a thread, Async or nothing for calling a ProgressDialog –  Simon Jan 25 '11 at 23:29
    
hmm, I just noticed you are passing in a variable context. How is this initialised? Try replacing it with MyActivity.this. –  dave.c Jan 25 '11 at 23:30
    
Sorry, I didn't include it all to keep it brief. But much like your example, I have a private void someFunction(int Id, Context context) { do thread stuff here } which I call from the activity. –  Simon Jan 25 '11 at 23:42
    
Right, but the value of context has to come from somewhere. I've updated my code to use MyActivity.this for clarity. –  dave.c Jan 25 '11 at 23:46

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