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Let's say you create a Wizard in an HTML form. One button goes back and one goes forward. Since the back button appears first in the markup, when you press Enter it will use that button to submit the form.

Example:

<form>
   <input type="text" name="field1" /> <!-- put your cursor in this field and press Enter -->

   <input type="submit" name="prev" value="Previous Page" /> <!-- This is the button that will submit -->
   <input type="submit" name="next" value="Next Page" /> <!-- But this is the button that I WANT to submit -->
</form>

What I would like to do, is get to decide which button is used to submit the form when a user presses Enter. That way, when you press Enter the Wizard will move to the next page, not the previous. Do you have to use tabindex to do this?

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16 Answers 16

up vote 67 down vote accepted

I hope this helps. I'm just doing the trick of floating the buttons on the right - like in normal wizard :-)

This way the Prev button is left of the Next button but the Next comes first in the HTML code:

<html>
<head>
    <style>
        .f {
            float: right;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <form action="action" method="get">
        <input type="text" name="abc">
        <div id="buttons">
            <input type="submit" class="f" name="next" value="Next">
            <input type="submit" class="f" name="prev" value="Prev">
            <div style="clear:both"></div><!-- Need this to have the buttons actually inside div#buttons -->
        </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

Hope this helps... :-)

Edit: Benefits over other suggestions: no JavaScript, accessible, both buttons remain type="submit"

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10  
Please don't do this without also changing the tab order, so that hitting the tab button will cycle through the buttons as they appear on screen. –  Steve Oct 11 '12 at 15:02

Would it be possible for you to change the previous button type int a button like this:

<input type="button" name="prev" value="Previous Page" />

Now the Next button would be the default, plus you could also add the default attribute to it so that your browser will highlight it like so:

<input type="submit" name="next" value="Next Page" default />

Hope that helps.

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22  
What default attribute are you talking about? There is no "default" attribute, which would be valid: w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/… (not in HTML5, HTML 4.01 Transitional/Strict, XHTML 1.0 Strict). And I don't see why changing the input type from submit to button would be better. You can have multiple submit type input elements in one form without a problem. I don't really understand why this answer is so upvoted. –  Sk8erPeter May 19 '13 at 10:18
    
Having an input of type "button" doesn't execute the form action. You can have an onclick or something, thus executing another function than the "default" form action (which is executed by pressing the "submit"-type button). That's what I was looking for and that's why I upvoted it. Can't speak for the "default" attribute, wasn't part of my problem;) thanks for your clarification, though. –  Jonas Feb 18 at 12:53

Give your submit buttons same name like this:

<input type="submit" name="submitButton" value="Previous Page" />
<input type="submit" name="submitButton" value="Next Page" />

When the user presses enter and the Request goes to server, you can check the value for submitButton on your server-side code which contains a collection of form name/value pairs. For example in classic ASP:

If Request.Form("submitButton") = "Previous Page" Then
    ' Code for Previous Page
ElseIf Request.Form("submitButton") = "Next Page" Then
    ' Code for Next Page
End If

Reference: Using multiple submit buttons on a single form

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17  
This is not what the user asked. The user wanted to know how to control which submit button in a form is activated when enter is pressed ie. which is the default button. –  kosoant Nov 6 '09 at 11:14
14  
doesn't work in an I18n application where you even dont know the label of the button. –  Chris Mar 5 '10 at 17:34

If the fact that the first button is used by default is consistent across browsers, why not put them the right way round in the source code, then use CSS to switch their apparent positions? float them left and right to switch them around visually, for example.

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If you really just want it to work like an install dialog, what about just giving focus to the "Next" button OnLoad. That way if the user hits Return, the form submits and goes forward. If they want to go back they can hit Tab or click on the button.

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They mean someone fills out a form and hits return while in a text field. –  Jordan Reiter Jan 9 '13 at 20:37

Kevin,

This works without javascript or CSS in most browsers:

<form>
<p><input type="text" name="field1" /></p>
<p><a href="previous.html">
<button type="button">Previous Page</button></a>
<button type="submit">Next Page</button></p>
</form>

Firefox, Opera, Safari, Google Chrome all work.
As always, IE is the problem.

This version works when javascript is turned on:

<form>
<p><input type="text" name="field1" /></p>
<p><a href="previous.html">
<button type="button" onclick="window.location='previous.html'">Previous Page</button></a>
<button type="submit">Next Page</button></p>
</form>

So the flaw in this solution is:
Previous Page does not work if you use IE with Javascript off.
Mind you, the back button still works!

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It can work with CSS

Put them in the markup as the next button first, then the previous button next.

Then use CSS to position them to appear the way you want

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I would use Javascript to submit the form. The function would be triggered by the OnKeyPress event of the form element, and would detect whether the Enter key was selected. If this is the case, it will submit the form.

Here are two pages that give techniques on how to do this: 1, 2. Based on these, here is an example of usage (based on here):

<SCRIPT TYPE="text/javascript"><!--
function submitenter(myfield,e) {
var keycode;
if (window.event) {
keycode = window.event.keyCode;
} else if (e) {
keycode = e.which;
} else {
return true;
}

if (keycode == 13) {
myfield.form.submit();
return false;
} else {
return true;
}
}
//--></SCRIPT>

<INPUT NAME="MyText" TYPE="Text" onKeyPress="return submitenter(this,event)" />
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1  
What happens if javascript is disabled? –  Jon Winstanley Apr 13 '09 at 10:18
    
You shouldn't use <!-- and --> to comment out JS, these tags are not Javascript language tokens –  Marecky Jan 28 '13 at 11:44
1  
@Marecky They're not to comment out JS. They are ignored when parsing the contents of <script> in a browser supporting <script>. Today they really aren't required. But in very ancient browsers, this was a compatibility hack to avoid the script to be printed as plain text. –  leemes Apr 11 '13 at 21:57

Kevin, this cannot be done with pure HTML. You must rely on JavaScript for this trick.

However, if you place two forms on the HTML page you can do this.

Form1 would have the previous button.

Form2 would have any user inputs + the next button.

When the user presses Enter in Form2, the Next submit button would fire.

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Sometimes the provided solution by @palotasb is not sufficient. There are use cases where for example a "Filter" submit button is placed above buttons like "Next and Previous". I found a workaround for this: copy the submit button which needs to act as the default submit button in a hidden div and place it inside the form above any other submit button. Technically it will be submitted by a different button when pressing Enter then when clicking on the visible Next button. But since the name and value is the same, there's no difference in the result.

<html>
<head>
    <style>
        div.defaultsubmitbutton {
            display: none;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <form action="action" method="get">
        <div class="defaultsubmitbutton">
            <input type="submit" name="next" value="Next">
        </div>
        <p><input type="text" name="filter"><input type="submit" value="Filter"></p>
        <p>Filtered results</p>
        <input type="radio" name="choice" value="1">Filtered result 1
        <input type="radio" name="choice" value="2">Filtered result 2
        <input type="radio" name="choice" value="3">Filtered result 3
        <div>                
            <input type="submit" name="prev" value="Prev">
            <input type="submit" name="next" value="Next">
        </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>
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Changing the tab order should be all it takes to accomplish this. Keep it simple.

Another simple option would be to put the back button after the submit button in the HTML code but float it to the left so it appears on the page before the submit button.

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keep the name of all submit buttons the same -- "prev" The only difference is the value attribute with unique values. When we create the script, these unique values will help us to figure out which of the submit buttons was pressed.

And write follwing coding:

    btnID = ""
if Request.Form("prev") = "Previous Page" then
    btnID = "1"
else if Request.Form("prev") = "Next Page" then
    btnID = "2"
end if
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Another simple option would be to put the back button after the submit button in the HTML code but float it to the left so it appears on the page before the submit button.

Changing the tab order should be all it takes to accomplish this. Keep it simple.

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This is what i have tried out: 1. You need to make sure you give your buttons different names 2. Write an if statement that will do the required action if either button in clicked.

<form>
<input type="text" name="field1" /> <!-- put your cursor in this field and press Enter -->

<input type="submit" name="prev" value="Previous Page" /> <!-- This is the button that will submit -->
<input type="submit" name="next" value="Next Page" /> <!-- But this is the button that I WANT to submit -->
</form>

In PHP,

if(isset($_POST['prev']))
{
header("Location: previous.html");
die();
}

if(isset($_POST['next']))
{
header("Location: next.html");
die();

}
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if you have multiple active buttons on one page then you can do something like this. Mark the first button you want triggers on {Enter} keypress as defaultbutton on the form. For the second button associate it to {Backspace} button on keyboard. //{Backspace} eventcode is 8.

<form action="action" method="get" defaultbutton="TriggerOnEnter">
 <input type="submit" id="PreviousButton" name="prev" value="Prev" class="secondary_button">
 <input type="submit" id='TriggerOnEnter' name="next" value="Next" class="primary_button">
</form>



   $(document).on("keydown", function(event) {

        if (event.which.toString() == "8") {

            var findActiveElementsClosestForm = $(document.activeElement).closest("form");

            if (findActiveElementsClosestForm && findActiveElementsClosestForm.length) {
                $("form#" + findActiveElementsClosestForm[0].id + " .secondary_button").trigger("click");
            }
        }
    });

Hope this helps.

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Using the example you gave:

<form>
<input type="text" name="field1" /><!-- put your cursor in this field and press Enter -->
<input type="submit" name="prev" value="Previous Page" /> <!-- This is the button that will submit -->
<input type="submit" name="next" value="Next Page" /> <!-- But this is the button that I WANT to submit -->
</form>

If you click on "Previous Page" only the value of "prev" will be submitted. If you click on "Next Page" only the value of "next" will be submitted.

If however, you press enter somewhere on the form, neither "prev" nor "next" will be submitted.

So using pseudo code you could do the following:

If "prev" submitted then
Previous Page was click
Else If "next" submitted then
Next Page was click
Else
No button was click
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There's never a situation (without using js) when none of the buttons is triggered. If you hit ENTER the first button in the code will catch the event. In the html-example it is the prev-button. –  SimonSimCity Dec 14 '11 at 15:53

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