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I want to write a C# program that executes several methods A(), B() and C() in random order. How can I do that?

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2  
Gjorgji, the GUID idea is terrible. Please at least order by Random - or better still, use the most voted algorithm. Take the hint from those votes - the community is telling you which one is better. –  romkyns Jan 26 '11 at 2:04
    
a very terrible idea, which is why you won't find anything on google if you look for it google.com/search?q=orderby+%22Guid.NewGuid%22 –  Pauli Østerø Jan 26 '11 at 2:30
3  
@Pauli, your belief is anything that you find on Google is automatically a good idea? –  Eric Lippert Jan 26 '11 at 3:13
    
@Eric: I trust everything on the Internet. –  Amy Jan 26 '11 at 3:17
1  
@Pauli, you have some serious nerves arguing your point after receiving 6 downvotes and numerous comments explaining your mistake, including two from Eric Lippert. It is becoming abundantly clear that you are not here to give right answers, nor to learn anything; you are here to bolster your ego. –  Timwi Jan 26 '11 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

Assuming a random number generator declared like this:

public static Random Rnd = new Random();

Let’s define a Shuffle function to bring a list into random order:

/// <summary>
/// Brings the elements of the given list into a random order
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of elements in the list.</typeparam>
/// <param name="list">List to shuffle.</param>
/// <returns>The list operated on.</returns>
public static IList<T> Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list)
{
    if (list == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("list");
    for (int j = list.Count; j >= 1; j--)
    {
        int item = Rnd.Next(0, j);
        if (item < j - 1)
        {
            var t = list[item];
            list[item] = list[j - 1];
            list[j - 1] = t;
        }
    }
    return list;
}

This Shuffle implementation courtesy of romkyns!

Now simply put the methods in a list, shuffle, then run them:

var list = new List<Action> { A, B, C };
list.Shuffle();
list.ForEach(method => method());
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The easiest way to shuffle in Linq is to use OrderBy(m => Guid.NewGuid()) –  Pauli Østerø Jan 26 '11 at 1:12
4  
+1 for real shuffle. –  SLaks Jan 26 '11 at 1:19
3  
@Pauli: It is always easier to write a program that sometimes outputs garbage than one that works reliably. –  Timwi Jan 26 '11 at 2:00
1  
Aren't you throwing away the results of the Shuffle in your usage example? Shouldn't it be: list.Shuffle().ForEach(method => method()); –  jasonh Jan 26 '11 at 2:53
1  
@jasonh: That would work too, and it would do the same thing. The method returns the same list you put in; it makes no difference whether you use that return value or the original list reference. They point to the same list, which is now shuffled. –  Timwi Jan 26 '11 at 13:28

This should be the shortest way to do it

var methods = new List<Action> { A, B, C }.OrderBy(m => Guid.NewGuid());
foreach (var m in methods) m();

Running the above to lines of code, calling methods that print out their names to the console reveals

1: ACB
2: BCA
3: CAB
4: ABC
5: BAC
6: CAB
7: ABC
8: ABC
9: BAC
10: CBA
11: CBA
12: ACB
13: BAC
14: CAB
15: CBA
16: ABC
17: CAB
18: CAB
19: ACB
20: ABC
21: CAB
22: CAB
23: ACB
24: CAB
25: ACB
26: ABC
27: ABC
28: BAC
29: BCA
30: BAC
31: BCA
32: ACB
33: BAC
34: ACB
35: CBA
36: BAC
37: ABC
38: BAC
39: ACB
40: BAC
41: CAB
42: CBA
43: ACB
44: ABC
45: BAC
46: BAC
47: CAB
48: BCA
49: ABC
50: CBA
51: BAC
52: CBA
53: ABC
54: CBA
55: ACB
56: CBA
57: CAB
58: CBA
59: ACB
60: BAC
61: ABC
62: CAB
63: CBA
64: BCA
65: BCA
66: ACB
67: ACB
68: CBA
69: ABC
70: CAB
71: ABC
72: BAC
73: BCA
74: ACB
75: BAC
76: BCA
77: CBA
78: ACB
79: ABC
80: CBA
81: ACB
82: ACB
83: BAC
84: BAC
85: ABC
86: ACB
87: CBA
88: BAC
89: ACB
90: CAB
91: ABC
92: BCA
93: CAB
94: ABC
95: ACB
96: CBA
97: BAC
98: ABC
99: CAB
100: BAC

On all the comments regarding the issue of Guids not being random, please read RCF4122 section 4.4 and 4.5 that states that V4 of UUIDs are based on truly-random or pseudo-random numbers. http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4122.txt. Windows 2000 and later generates V4 UUIDs.

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3  
Randomly ordering a list using Guid.NewGuid() is neither convention nor recommended good practice. –  LukeH Jan 26 '11 at 1:13
1  
Since a Linq-based ORM will recognize the Guid.NewGuid() and translate it into a server-based random (ie NEWID()), i fail to see why you should use different ways to randomize a list, depending on your underlying datasource. That defies the whole purpose of Linq. –  Pauli Østerø Jan 26 '11 at 1:22
4  
Good discussion of this topic here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2621563/… Main point: Unique != Random –  shaunmartin Jan 26 '11 at 1:31
1  
@Pauli: That’s obviously wrong. If it generated sequential values (1, 2, 3, etc.) they would obviously all be unique, but the ordering will always be the same (A, B, C). –  Timwi Jan 26 '11 at 1:42
16  
Ordering via guids is a terrible idea. There are plenty of ways of writing an efficient shuffle; use one of them. –  Eric Lippert Jan 26 '11 at 1:46

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