Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
function month(num) {
    if (num == 1) {
        return "January";
    } else if (num == 2) {
        return "Feburary";
    } else if (num == 3) {
        return "March";
    } else if (num == 4) {
        return "April";
    } else if (num == 5) {
        return "May";
    } else if (num == 6) {
        return "June";
    } else if (num == 7) {
        return "July";
    } else if (num == 8) {
        return "August";
    } else if (num == 9) {
        return "September";
    } else if (num == 10) {
        return "October";
    } else if (num == 11) {
        return "November";
    } else if (num == 12) {
        return "December";
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

jQuery/Javascript.

share|improve this question
1  
Btw, you misspelled "February"! – david Jan 26 '11 at 2:42
    
@david - haha and I copied it. lol. – Reigel Jan 26 '11 at 2:45
    
Hahaha, thanks. Late night error. – switz Jan 26 '11 at 2:53
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Yes, use the month number as an index into an array of strings (month names).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, great idea. Thanks. I'll try that. – switz Jan 26 '11 at 2:34
    
and if you ever want to do more than just returning a string, try to use a switch statement which makes it much more readable... – WarrenFaith Jan 26 '11 at 2:36
    
function month(num){var months = [ "January","February","March","April","May","June","July","August", "September","October","November","December" ]; return months[num-1]||false;} – generalhenry Jan 26 '11 at 2:39
function month(num) {
    if (num < 1 || num > 12 ) { return false; }
    var months = ["January","Feburary","March","April","May","June","July","August","September","October","November","December"];

    return months[num-1]

}
share|improve this answer

Or, you could do it the Wrong Way:

function month(num) {
    return new Date(0,num-1).toLocaleDateString().split(" ")[1];
}

Look how short it is! :)

Alas, there's a strong chance this will break in various browsers and countries. Alternatively, it might translate the month names for you automatically.

Anyway, don't do that.

You're welcome.

share|improve this answer
var month = function(n){
    return ["January", "February", "March",
         "April", "May", "June", "July",
         "August", "September", "October",
         "November", "December"][n-1]||false;
};
alert(month(3));

Here is an example of how to do it using the module pattern (because that's what all the cool kids do these days):

var MonthModule = (function(){
    var MonthsArray = [
        "January", "February", "March",
        "April", "May", "June", "July",
        "August", "September", "October",
        "November", "December"    
    ];
    var MonthsEnum = {
        "January" : 1, "February" : 2, "March" : 3,
        "April" : 4, "May" : 5, "June" : 6,
        "July" : 7, "August" : 8, "September" : 9,
        "October" : 10, "November" : 11, "December" : 12
    };

    var getMonthFromNumber = function(n){
        return MonthsArray[n-1]||false;
    };

    var getMonthFromName = function(s){
        return MonthsEnum[s]||false;
    };

    return {
        getMonthFromNumber : getMonthFromNumber,
        getMonthFromName : getMonthFromName
    };
}());

alert(MonthModule.getMonthFromNumber(5));
alert(MonthModule.getMonthFromName("February"));
share|improve this answer

I haven't touched Javascript in a while, so the syntax might be whacky, but I'm pretty sure this should work.

my.namespace.MonthEnum = {
    JANUARY   : { value:  1, name: "January" },
    FEBRUARY  : { value:  2, name: "February" },
    MARCH     : { value:  3, name: "March" },
    APRIL     : { value:  4, name: "April" },
    MAY       : { value:  5, name: "May" },
    JUNE      : { value:  6, name: "June" },
    JULY      : { value:  7, name: "July" },
    AUGUST    : { value:  8, name: "August" },
    SEPTEMBER : { value:  9, name: "September" },
    OCTOBER   : { value: 10, name: "October" },
    NOVEMBER  : { value: 11, name: "November" },
    DECEMBER  : { value: 12, name: "December" },
}

function month(num) {
    var months = my.namespace.MonthEnum;
    for (var month in months) {
        if (month.value == num)
            return month.name;
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can someone explain this to me? haha – switz Jan 26 '11 at 2:58
    
That's a bad answer. No need to complicate things with a special structure. – eipipuz Jan 26 '11 at 2:58
1  
Greg is being awesome – david Jan 26 '11 at 3:03
    
It's not a "bad" answer (you know bad code when you see it and that's a far cry from what I've seen) ... just not quite optimal ;-) A direct look-up (array or dictionary) is what I'd choose here because it's simpler (and quicker to boot!). There is, however, some bugs. month[value] and month[name] should read month.value and month.name, respectively and hasOwnProperty is generally good when using for(..in..). Anyway, cheers. – user166390 Jan 26 '11 at 4:46
1  
if you didn't figure it out, the above was kind of a tongue-in-cheek overkill code answer... (@pst, thanks for pointing out my obvious goof; fixed) – Greg Buehler Jan 26 '11 at 5:28

All answers directly/indirectly imply 1 solution - "HASH"

You need to build a "HASH".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.